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Course Offerings

All courses are 4 credits unless otherwise noted.

Accounting

ACCT 205 Financial Accounting
A complete and balanced treatment of the concepts and procedures used by business organizations to measure and report their performance. Emphasizes the accounting cycle and preparation of the income statement, balance sheet and statement of cash flows. Financial statement analysis and interpretation is introduced. Covers income from merchandising operations, internal control, current and long-term assets, liabilities and stockholders’ equity. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or instructor’s consent.

ACCT 206 Managerial Accounting (for non-accounting majors)
The course includes managerial information for planning, controlling and decision-making. Cost concepts and behaviors are studied and used for product costing in job order and standard costing systems and for performance evaluation, tactical and budgeting decisions. The emphasis is on the use of accounting information by managers. This course is not open to accounting majors. Prerequisites: ACCT 205, BUAD 142 or CSCI 110, BUAD 284. BUAD 284 can be taken concurrently with ACCT 206.

ACCT 229 Fraud Investigation 1 (2 credits)
This course explores the various forms of occupational fraud: who commits fraud, why and how fraud is committed, and how to prevent and detect fraudulent activities. Prerequisites: BUAD 142, BUAD 210, BUAD 231, ACCT 205 with a grade of “C” or better.

ACCT 305 Accounting Information Systems
This course combines methodologies, controls and accounting techniques with information technology. Topics include processes and flow of various business transaction cycles, recognition and implementation of internal controls, data integrity and security, database theory and application, and current trends in information systems. Prerequisites: BUAD 142; ACCT 205; MATH 128. Spring semester.

ACCT 315 Managerial Cost Accounting (for Accounting Majors)
Covers concepts, systems, planning and control, cost behavior, and decision-making. The course integrates both traditional and contemporary issues in cost management and decision-making. The course emphasizes both the preparation of reports and the accountant’s role in the management decision-making process. Students who have already taken ACCT 206 cannot take this course. Prerequisites: ACCT 205; BUAD 284; BUAD 142 or CSCI 110. BUAD 284 can be taken concurrently with ACCT 315. Fall semester.

ACCT 316 Advanced Cost Accounting (2 credits)
This course is designed for accounting majors that require advanced study in cost accounting topics. Topics covered may include, but are not limited to, contemporary management, quantitative techniques, report generation and analysis. Prerequisite: ACCT 206 or ACCT 315. Spring semester during first seven weeks.

ACCT 318 Auditing
This course is a broad introduction to the field of auditing. It emphasizes the philosophy and environment of the auditing profession, including the nature and purpose of auditing, auditing standards, professional conduct, auditor’s legal liability, and the approach followed in performing financial statement audits. Other topics include internal control, audit sampling, accumulating audit evidence, reporting responsibilities, other attestation and accounting services, and internal, compliance and operational auditing. Prerequisite: ACCT 325. Fall semester.

ACCT 320 Accounting for Government and Not-for-Profit (2 credits)
This course conducts an overview of accounting methods, procedures and financial reporting primarily for state and local governments and non-profits. Students will be able to comprehend the similarities and differences between fund types and be able to understand and prepare various reporting statements. This course is optional, however, the topic is tested on the CPA exam. Prerequisites: ACCT 205, BUAD 284. ACCT 320 can be taken concurrently with BUAD 284. Spring semester.

ACCT 325 Intermediate Accounting 1
This first intermediate course covers comprehensive and complex issues of financial accounting. The course pays special attention to contributions to the accounting field made by professional and research groups. Topics include primary financial statements and their preparation, accounting and the time value of money, cash and receivables, investments, inventories, acquisition and disposition of property, plant and equipment, depreciation and depletion, intangible assets, and revenue recognition. Prerequisites: grade of “C” or better in ACCT 205, BUAD 284. ACCT 325 can be taken concurrently with BUAD 284. Fall semester.

ACCT 326 Intermediate Accounting 2
This second intermediate course continues the study of comprehensive and complex financial accounting concepts and procedures. Topics include current liabilities, long-term liabilities, contributed capital, retained earnings, dilutive securities, earnings per share, accounting for income taxes, pensions, leases, accounting changes, and statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: ACCT 325. Spring semester.

ACCT 329 Fraud Investigation 2 (2 credits)
This course is an extension of Fraud Investigation I and provides an overview of financial statement fraud. The course introduces you to various forms of financial statement fraud in areas such as revenue, inventory and liabilities. Prerequisites: ACCT 229, ACCT 325 or BUAD 350.

ACCT 419 Federal Income Tax
Topics include individual, partnership, corporate, payroll, installment sales, depreciation and asset cost recovery systems, sales and exchanges, capital gains and losses, and legal basis for gain or loss. Prerequisites: ACCT 205, BUAD 284. Fall semester.

ACCT 421 Advanced Federal Income Tax (2 credits)
This is an advanced study of corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts, gift taxes, specially taxed corporations, capital changes and securities. Prerequisite: ACCT 419. Spring semester during first seven weeks.

ACCT 422 Accounting Business Combinations (2 credits)
This course is a study of advanced accounting topics including business combinations, equity method of accounting for investments, purchase methods, consolidated financial statements, various intercompany transactions, multinational accounting, foreign currency transactions, and translation of foreign financial statements. Prerequisite: ACCT 326. Spring semester. 

American Studies

AMER / HIST 114  History of the United States 1 (Core: DD)
This course will trace the political, social and cultural development of the U.S. from its pre-Columbian origins through the Civil War. From encounters between early colonists and Native Americans, to midwives tending to colonial women, to 19th-century laborers adjusting to industrial changes, and finally to the slave trade. This course will pay particular attention to the role of race, class and gender in shaping society and politics.

AMER / HIST 115 History of the United States 2 (Core: DD)
This course will trace the political, social, and cultural development of the U.S. from Reconstruction to the present. From Jim Crow segregation to labor organizing during the Great Depression to women’s rights movements to the debates over immigration, this course will pay particular attention to the role of race, class, and gender in shaping society and politics.

AMER / POLI 130 United States Politics and Government (Core: IS)
A survey of the U.S. political system at the national, state and local levels including examination of constitutions, social and political ideology, mass political behavior, parties and interest groups, Congress, the presidency, the courts, and the development of national public policy. Focuses on the problems of policy making in a pluralistic democratic system.

AMER / MUSI 184 History of American Popular Music (Core: WT)
The course will cover the history of popular music in the United States from the late 19th century to the present day. Genres that will be discussed include modern styles such as rock, R&B, hip-hop, folk, country, jazz, ragtime, blues, and early musical theater. A chronological study of popular styles will expose students to important songwriters and performers and show how their music was influenced by elements like racial prejudice, political events, and social structures. Modern technological influences (radio, recording media, television, computers) will also be explored.

AMER / THRS 221 Religion in America (Core: DD)
This course explores the history and character of American religion and the role of religion in American life. As a class we will address such broad questions as: is there such a thing as American religion, what role has religion played in shaping American culture, how have religion and belief been shaped by the particularities of the American political and geographical context? Students will read and discuss both primary and secondary source material and will have ample opportunity to develop and pursue their own questions about the myriad religious dimensions of American life.

AMER / ENGL 235 Survey of U.S. Literature 1 (Beginning to 1865)
This course introduces students to the major writers, literary movements and cultural and historical context in the U.S. from its origins to the end of the Civil War. Students examine American Indian creation stories, trickster tales, encounter narratives, Puritan prose and poetry, the literature of the Enlightenment and the Revolutionary War, slave narratives, and the rise of Romanticism. Writers include Cabeza de Vaca, Bradford, Bradstreet, Rowlandson, Edwards, Wheatley, Rowson, Irving, Equiano, Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Melville, Whitman, Harding, Davis and Dickinson. Fall semester.

AMER / ENGL 236 Survey of U.S. Literature 2 (1865 to the present)
This course introduces students to the major authors, periods and literary movements in the U.S. from the end of the Civil War to the present. Students read the works of poets, fiction writers and dramatists from the rise of Realism and Naturalism through the Modernist movement in the U.S. to the Postmodern era after World War II. Writers include Dickinson, Clemens, Crane, Jewett, Chopin, Black Elk, Frost, Stevens, Faulkner, O’Neill, O’Connor, Updike, Erdrich, Ginsberg and Plath. Spring semester.

AMER 261 Introduction to American Studies (Core: DD)
As an introduction to the field of American studies, this course assumes an interdisciplinary perspective on the question of what “American” means in the world of ideas using a variety of genres: history, fiction, poetry, film, sociology, journalism, speeches and essays. This course analyzes several myths that pervade American culture, always bearing in mind that while myths tend to exaggerate, they also hold grains of truth. The course examines how the notion of the American Dream, for example, has both fostered and hindered progress for individuals within this nation. Potential authors include Barbara Ehrenreich, Ernest Gaines, F. Scott Fitzgerald, W.E.B. DuBois and Sandra Cisneros. Fall semester.

AMER 289 Special Topics
This is a seminar course offered whenever a mutual interest in a more specialized topic in American Studies exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent.

AMER / PHIL 305 American Philosophy - Adv. (Core: WT)
A study of the major movements and figures in American philosophy and intellectual history. The course will examine the diverse philosophical themes in the American tradition including idealism, 18th-century political theory, transcendentalism and pragmatism. Figures studied include Edwards, Adams, Jefferson, Emerson, Thoreau, James and Dewey. Spring semester.

AMER / ENGL / WMGS 311 Women and Literature
Through exploring literary texts by women, this course analyzes how the construction of “woman,” sex and gender has changed over time and investigates how it intersects with issues of race, class, sexuality and nation. By using feminist literary theory, the course engages the most pressing issues in the field from ideas of women’s literary voice to claims that challenge female authorship altogether. Special topics may include contemporary women writers, gender and 19th century novel, and ethnic women writers. Authors may include Virginia Woolf, Adrienne Rich, Gloria Anzaldua, Margaret Atwood, Bharati Mukherjee, Leslie Feinberg, Edwidge Danticat and Marjane Satrapi. Alternate years.

AMER / POLI 317 American Political Thought
This course examines the development of political thought in the U.S. from the American Revolution to the present day. Particular attention will be paid to issues of political inclusion and exclusion on the basis of race, gender, sexuality, national origin and class. Changing attitudes in the relationship between individual liberty and majority rule will also be a dominant theme of the course as well as the proper role of government in addressing social problems.

AMER / MUSI 318 Evolution of Jazz (Adv. Core: DD)
The study of jazz from its origins in New Orleans to the present day. The course focuses on important performers and songwriters, types of literature, an appreciation of jazz improvisation as well as how the interaction of race, politics, economics and other elements of society influence music and musicians. Audio and video presentations will be used extensively.

AMER / HIST 322 American Immigration and Ethnic History
This course traces the history of immigration to the United States from the 19th century to the present. In the 19th century waves of immigrants arrived in the U.S., building communities and sparking outrage among “native” Americans. Today, many descendants of these immigrants call for tighter border control. This course will examine immigrant characteristics and motivations as well as legislation that has defined what it means to be “American” and changed patterns of migration. Throughout, we will ask: what does it mean to be an immigrant in this nation and what does it mean to be a “nation of immigrants?” Alternate years.

AMER / ENGL 323 The Harlem Renaissance
This course examines the flowering of culture in the areas of literature, music, dance and art which took place predominantly during the 1920s for black Americans located in Harlem, New York, a movement that has become known as the Harlem Renaissance. The course places this cultural renaissance, or rebirth, within the historical context out of which it grew: the modernizing America in a post-WWI era, the rise of jazz and the blues and the Great Migration among other factors. Some of the writers, intellectuals, visual and performing artists studied may include Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, James Weldon Johnson, Nella Larsen, Claude McKay, Alain Locke, Helene Johnson, Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, Bessie Smith, Ma Rainey and Duke Ellington.

AMER / HIST 324 Poverty, Charity, and Welfare in American History
This course will examine the poor in modern America from orphans in Chicago’s Home for the Friendless to sharecroppers in the Great Depression to Reagan’s notorious welfare queen of the 1980s. Students will analyze primary and secondary sources to understand why they were poor and how they coped with the insecurity and instability of poverty and to investigate America’s various anti-poverty crusades. Finally, considering the majority of non-white men and women living below the poverty line, we will pay particular attention to race and gender, and ask how Americans have responded to, and at times perpetuated, this disparity. Alternate years.

AMER / HIST / WMGS 327 Women and Gender in United States History
This course will explore women and gender in American history from colonial America to the present. We will examine how gender norms changed throughout history and how individuals interacted with those norms. Students will analyze how women and notions about gender shaped American politics through cultural trends like fashion; through family and daily life; and through social movements like suffrage, temperance and welfare rights. Students will ask: when did gender constrict the choices that individuals face, and when did individuals expand and even disassemble gender norms?

AMER / ENGL 329 Literature of Service
This course addresses concepts of American culture through the dual lenses of literary texts and community-based learning. The course explores individuals and communities in crisis or transition as a result of poor health, poverty, immigration, homelessness and gendered, sexual, racial or ethnic discrimination. Throughout the semester paired students regularly volunteer at local community service agencies and expand their knowledge of these concepts by writing reflection journals as well as various forms of researched persuasive critical writing (literary analysis, opinion editorials, grant proposals and newsletters). Authors may include Dorothy Day, Robert Coles, Jane Addams, William Carlos Williams, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Fae Myenne Ng or Li-Young Lee.

AMER / POLI 335 Congress and Legislatures
An examination of the power, structure and functions of legislative bodies at the national and state levels in the U.S. Focuses on the various factors that influence the performance of these bodies. Fall semester, alternate years. Prerequisite: POLI 130.

AMER 389 Special Topics
This is a seminar course offered whenever a mutual interest in a more specialized topic in American Studies exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students.

AMER 489 Special Topics
This is a seminar course offered whenever a mutual interest in a more specialized topic in American Studies exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students.

AMER 490 Independent Study
Individual study of an approved topic in American Studies under the direction of an American Studies faculty member. Permits faculty and students to explore together some subject of special or personal interest. Past topics have included Narratives of the U.S. West and AIDS Literature, Art and Culture. Reading, tutorial discussion and written work are required. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and approval of the associate dean of humanities.  

AMER 499 American Studies Research Project (0 credits)
American Studies minors are required to complete an interdisciplinary research project as part of their final American studies elective course outside their major at the 300 level or above (see list of elective courses). Students enroll in AMER 499 concurrently with their final elective course.

Art

ART 110 History of Western Art (Core: WT)
This course will advance the belief that art is an irreplaceable way of understanding and expressing the world — equal to but distinct from other methods of inquiry and certainty. By charting the emergence of unique and continuous traditions of visual imagery from Chauvet to the last works of the Post–Impressionists, this course will highlight canonical paintings and sculpture from major periods of Western culture. Focusing on the key innovations, personalities and styles of Western art, this general survey class will encourage a basic appreciation, analysis, recognition and interpretation of art.

ART 112 History of Modern Design (Core: WT)
This course will explore how humans interact with everyday products, environments and visual mediums that we encounter on a daily basis. The course is a survey of design history beginning with the Arts and Crafts movement (1880-1910) through Post Modernism.

ART 115 History of Modern Art (Core: WT)
A survey course rooted in the Modernist injunction, “Astonish me!”, this class will examine major figures, movements, and breakthroughs made by the Western artistic imagination in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Different conceptions of modern art that emerged during this period, particularly the images and objects by Pablo Picasso and Andy Warhol, will be presented and discussed. Basic principles of general art appreciation, analysis, recognition and interpretation will be emphasized. Art as an experience that awakens, enlarges, refines and restores our humanity will characterize this class.

ART 124 Basic Digital Photography
This course is an introductory digital photography course. Students will learn the basic techniques that will help them take better photographs. Framing, exposure and lighting will be discussed as well as hands-on work with images in the digital environment preparing photographs for output. This course is not graded using a traditional letter grade system. Students will receive a grade of either satisfactory “S” or unsatisfactory “U.” This course does not replace ART 280 Introduction to Photography and Digital Imaging. A digital camera is required for this course.

ART 125 Introduction to Adobe Photoshop (for non-majors)
An introductory elective course that explores the process of digital image manipulation using Adobe Photoshop as the primary tool. The course examines various aspects of the digital process including digital image capture (scanner and camera), digital image manipulation and preparation of images for electronic publication. J-Term and Summer Session. This course is not graded using a traditional letter-grade system. Students will receive a grade of either satisfactory (“S”) or unsatisfactory (“U”).

ART 130 Introduction to Design  
This course is an introduction to design focusing on fundamental principles of two-dimensional design and the process of creating assorted design-related projects. A focus on projects that incorporate design elements that may include line, shape, space, motion, value, color, pattern and texture. It will also focus on design principles including process, unity, scale and proportion, balance and rhythm. The course is designed to provide students with a general understanding of concepts, theories and language related to two-dimensional design.

ART 131 Introduction to Studio Art
This course is an introduction to studio art focusing on fundamental principles of design, fine art technical processes and methods of production. This course is designed to provide students with a general understanding of concepts, theories and language related to two- and three-dimensional studio art practice, as well as forms of time-based media. There is an emphasis on skills and principles required to create and critique art and design, particularly in the context of contemporary art practices. Students will learn to solve aesthetic, visual and conceptual problems through a variety of media and materials.

ART 134 Basic Drawing  
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of drawing. Line, modeling, light and shadow, composition, Renaissance, and intuitive perspective will be explored with a strong emphasis on life drawing.

ART 141 Drawing and Visual Perception (Core: EI)
This studio course explores the foundational practice of drawing from observation. The course explores drawing using a variety of media and techniques. Drawing from observation is essential in the study of the visual arts. This practice develops key interpretive and reflective skills. Focused attention and observation enhances one’s ability to interpret their surrounding environment and to process the information around them critically through the focused physical interpretation of sight.

ART 144 Introduction to Video Production (Core: EI)
An introductory video production elective course designed to fully explore the production process using professional digital editing and production software. Students will be creating their own work from concept to final realization exploring the range from pre-production to post-production and exporting for final output. A digital video camera is required for this course. Summer session.

ART 145 Rotoscope Animation (Core: EI)
An introductory animation production elective course designed to fully explore the animation production process using both traditional and digital techniques. Students will be creating their own animation projects from concept to final realization, exploring the range of animation techniques from traditional hand-drawn animation to digital rotoscoping. Rotoscoping is an animation technique in which animators trace over live action source footage frame by frame to achieve more realistic movement in their animated work. The primary software tool for the course will be iStopMotion. Summer session.

ART 205 Art, Technology and Society (Core: EI)
This course is a research- and writing-intensive course exploring technological developments in the fine arts since the advent of photography. The course will examine the development of photography, film, video and digital technologies and their impact on the fine arts, as well as the way artists have utilized these technologies to reflect upon, analyze, critique and investigate social issues of their day.

ART 215 Sacred Art and Architecture (Core: CI)
This course is an examination of the pliancy of sacred art and architecture within the history of Catholic belief and sacramental celebration.  Focusing primarily on liturgical accouterments, sacred art and religious environments, devotional practices and the key historical figures, themes, rites and rituals within Catholic culture, this class will explore how the Catholic imagination has responded to evolving concepts of divinity, holiness, memory, gender and sanctity over the course of two millennia.

ART 224 Introduction to Sculpture  
An introduction to three-dimensional form, processes and materials. The course introduces the elements of art in a three dimensional context with an emphasis on skill building, basic tool introduction and exploration of materials. Assignments require students to work independently outside of the sculpture studio. Demonstration, critique and focused studio practice are primary methods of instruction.

ART 226 Mixed Media Sculpture
This course allows students to conduct a personal and focused exploration on means of artistic expression not covered by the regular sculpture curriculum.  It will encourage students to research unconventional and traditionally underrepresented (outsider, self-taught, naïve) artists who have utilized non-traditional materials (mixed-media) in the creation of works of art that address themes, genres and points-of-view that have enriched humankind’s search for meaning and self-expression.  The class will focus on completing a number of original works of art determined in consultation with the class instructor. Prerequisite: ART 224. Spring semester, alternate years.


ART 230 Beginning Printmaking
This course is an introduction to a variety of basic printmaking processes and equipment. Techniques may include monotypes, intaglio and relief. Multiple original images are produced. Assignments require students to work independently in the print shop outside of class hours. Prerequisite: ART 130 or ART 131. Previous enrollment in ART 130 or ART 131 is strongly encouraged. Fall semester.

ART 240 Introductory Painting
Introduction to painting materials and techniques with an emphasis on direct painting methods and painting from observation. Students will investigate color, form and composition. Demonstration, critique and focused studio practice are primary methods of instruction.

ART 280 Introduction to Photography and Digital Imaging
An introductory studio-based photography course exploring the tools and techniques of digital photography and digital imaging. This course provides essential foundational skills required for a career in photography. Primary software includes Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Bridge. A DSLR with manual control is required. Prerequisite: ART 130 or ART 131.

ART 310 Non-Western Art History (Adv Core: BB)
This course is a lecture and discussion based course with a student research component, that will explore non-Western art and architecture from a cultural, religious and historical perspective. The thematic organization of the course will allow students can make connections between the spread of religions, cultural values, conquest, trade and the expression of these elements in artistic traditions. The course will explore the arts of Asia, Africa, the Americas and the Middle East with an emphasis on art as the fluid expression of culture. Non-Western canonical works in art, sculpture and architecture will be highlighted, as the course will cover major works from these four major regions of the world. Through readings, discussion, research and presentations students will gain the ability to recognize, analyze and interpret non-Western Art. Prerequisite: ART 110.

ART 324 Intermediate Sculpture (Adv. Core: EI)
A focused exploration of sculptural techniques and strategies with an emphasis on mold making, casting and forming with plastic materials. More in-depth use of tools and technical processes as well as a special emphasis on the development of personal statements and interest. In addition to demonstration, critique and studio practice, student presentations, artist research and discussions are also modes of instruction. Prerequisite: ART 224.

ART 330 Intermediate Printmaking (Adv. Core: EI)
This is an intensified printmaking course with an emphasis on building multi-layered and more complex images. Techniques may include photo-serigraphy, intaglio, relief and book arts. Assignments require students to work independently in the print shop outside of class hours. Prerequisite: ART 230.

ART 335 Advertising Design
An introduction to problem solving and the basic elements of graphic design. Emphasis is placed on the development of concepts and skills in the layout of typography, illustration and photography. Prerequisite: ART 350.

ART 337 Winter in Rome: Art in Context (Adv. Core: WT)
This course will explore Rome as a living museum of important western intellectual and artistic traditions with foundations in antiquity. Students will engage with Renaissance and Baroque architecture, art and intellectual works in context, as well as antiquity, including Roman architectural sites, sculpture and objects.  Western artistic traditions, the influence of patronage and influences on contemporary ideas will be discussed alongside the works. Visits will include, Roman sites, churches, Roman and Vatican museums and contemporary art museums. Some sites relevant to the topic outside of Rome will be visited for short trips. Students will be able to respond to these experiences with studio works in clay, rubbings and impressions, sketchbook diaries and blogposts. January term, alternate years.

ART 340 Intermediate Painting (Adv. Core: EI)
Along with continued development of the methods and techniques explored in ART 240, students investigate indirect painting methods and contemporary painting practices and theory. Traditional and contemporary approaches to painting the human figure are introduced and students develop independent projects and individual artist statements. Prerequisite: ART 240.

ART 350 Computer Graphics
An introduction to various graphic applications on the Macintosh platform: Modern graphic design history, layout, electronic illustration and photographic manipulation are covered in this course. Prerequisite: ART 130 and ART 131 or consent of instructor.

ART / WMGS 375 Race, Gender and Contemporary Art (Adv. Core: DD)
A survey of how artists explore and express personal identity, unique bias and social marginalization and how contemporary art reflects society's evolving and changing attitudes toward matters of life, love and death.

ART 380 Contemporary Photographic Strategies  
A studio-based photography course exploring the strategies, techniques and approaches in contemporary fine art photography. The main objectives of the course are increasing control of the photographic process and increasing sophistication in developing projects from their initial intent to their desired outcome within the context of contemporary fine art photographic strategies. A DSLR camera is required. Prerequisite: ART 280.

ART 389 Special Topics
An in-depth study of an artistic issue of special interest. ART 389 may focus on one or more art forms, an artistic movement or comparison of movements, or a theme. Students are challenged to evaluate trends in historical and contemporary art production as it relates to their own art making. Prerequisites: ART 110, ART 130, ART 131 and ART 134.

ART 424 Advanced Sculpture (Adv. Core: EI)
In this advanced course, students pursue individual courses of study through the creation of an overall proposal and timeline for the semester with an emphasis on artistic research, interests and ideas. Students should demonstrate the ability to create cohesive, thematic bodies of work for exhibition and that they can work independently. Prerequisite: ART 324.

ART 425 Sculpture Topics in Clay
In this advanced course, students pursue individual courses of study through the creation of an overall proposal and timeline for the semester.  There is an emphasis on developing a deeper understanding of ceramic processes, materials and concepts, including slip casting, wheel throwing, hand building and other surface and firing techniques. Students should demonstrate the ability to create cohesive, thematic bodies of work for exhibition and demonstrate that they can work independently.  Prerequisite: ART 224, ART 324 or consent of instructor.

ART 430 Advanced Printmaking (Adv. Core: EI)
This course is an upper level printmaking course with student-proposed independent projects. Students are expected to demonstrate greater independence in working and to produce more thematically consistent bodies of work for a final exhibition. Assignments require students to work independently in the print shop outside of class hours. Prerequisite: ART 330.

ART 440 Advanced Painting (Adv. Core: EI)
Under the guidance of the instructor, students pursue individual courses of study. Through a concrete synthesis of content development and technical skill, each student creates a cohesive body of paintings. Emphasis is placed on the articulation of art process, content and philosophy. Prerequisite: ART 340.

ART 460 Digital Studio
This is a fine arts digital studio course that explores the impact of digital technologies on contemporary art practice. The course includes the production of motion graphics, video production and animation. Theory and history relating to technology and art will be explored and discussed. While working within the context of fine art, this course will explore skills and techniques required for a career in multi-media production. A video camera is highly recommended. Prerequisite: ART 350 or consent of instructor.

ART 480 Advanced Studio
Advanced Studio is an intensive guided independent studio course that builds upon skills and strategies introduced throughout previous studio coursework. This course will include guided independent production and research in studio practice, art or design history, and critical theory. Students will develop a number of independent projects and will be expected to complete a major research project in relation to their studio productions. The research project will include art historical and theoretical inquiry relating to their studio-based work.

ART 485 Design for the Web
This studio course explores web site design and production. It includes preparing web graphics, designing and assembling web pages, and publication of web sites. It covers terminology and current topics associated with the Internet, web design and web publishing. Prerequisite: ART 350.

ART 490 Independent Study  
Specially qualified students under the guidance of an instructor may study various aspects of art. Note: this course may not be used to replace the 400 level studio requirement. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and approval by associate dean of visual and performing arts.

ART 494 Internship
This internship experience allows students to apply their studies in a supervised work situation. Students benefit from an inside look at different kinds of corporations and agencies, a chance to work in their field of study, and to gain experience with projects and technologies that reflect the applied sector. Prerequisites: junior/senior standing and instructor’s consent.

ART 499 Senior Art Capstone (Required for all majors) (0 credits)
The Senior Art Capstone emphasizes studio and professional practice, art theory and critical research. Students refine recent work and develop new work in preparation for the Senior Art Exhibition, which is the culminating experience of the art major. Students are introduced to professional practice skills: planning, marketing and promoting artwork, documenting work and preparing materials for grants, and scholarship and residency applications. Students learn to develop an artist talk, portfolio, biography, artist’s statement and curriculum vitae. Senior year.

Biology

BIOL 105 Human Biology and Society (Core: PN)
Human biology includes discussion and study of selected topics in biology of particular relevance to humans and to human health and disease. Topics include the biology of human cells and selected organ systems; exercise physiology; cancer biology, early detection and prevention; genetics and genetic diseases; cardiovascular disease; the immune system and immunologic diseases such as AIDS; human nutrition and nutritional effects; and microbial human diseases. Each unit of study will include references to human evolution, human impact on society and the environment, and how each of these factors has played a role in shaping human health and the health care system. Laboratories will include the application of experimental methods and techniques for understanding the relationship between cell structure and function; exploration into human health; and the effect of humans on the environment.

BIOL 106 Humans and the Environment (Core: PN)
This course is an introduction to cell- and systems-level biology in humans and other animals that will allow students to understand how our activity affects our own biology and that of other organisms, with a focus on topics such as sustainability, environmental protection, and social responsibility in the face of advancing science relating to advances in manufacturing, medicine/pharmaceuticals and genetic engineering.

BIOL 107 Human Evolution, Extinction, and Scientific Thinking (Core: WT)
This is a problem-oriented course focusing on human evolution and variation. It includes a consideration of the interaction between biological and cultural factors in human evolution and a critical examination of theories of evolutionary changes from a paleontological perspective. It provides a detailed examination of human evolution through a discussion of the fossil record, associated archaeological material (such as stone tool technology and rock art), and the theories used to explain this evidence. The course will provide a broad overview of these important topics. Other topics such as hominin dispersals, the origin of modern humans and prehistoric colonization will be treated in greater detail. There will be laboratory sessions examining, describing and discussing hominin skeletal material and associated archaeological evidence.

BIOL 108 Biodiversity (Core: PN)
This course is designed to introduce students to the amazing diversity of organisms in our world. Students will discuss how organisms within this diversity survive, function, reproduce, and behave in their natural environment. In addition, students will learn how environmental change, both natural and human-caused, affects diversity. Meanwhile, the class will explore interesting questions scientists ask about diversity. Ultimately, each student will leave this course with an enhanced appreciation for the diversity of life on Earth, an understanding of how this diversity has arisen, an awareness of the effects of humans on diversity, an understanding of how scientists ask and answer questions, and an understanding of the complex interactions that take place within biological communities.

BIOL 120 General Biology 1
A lecture and laboratory study of living systems with particular emphasis on the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels of organization in plants, animals and prokaryotes. Genetic mechanisms and aspects of development are included. Fall semester. Note: BIOL 120 and BIOL 121 are considered an introductory sequence for biology majors in both the biomedical and organismal concentrations in biology and are recommended for pre-professional students who desire an emphasis in biological sciences.

BIOL 121 General Biology 2 (Core: PN)
A lecture and laboratory study of living organisms with emphasis on heterotrophic protists, plants, fungi and animals. Evolutionary theory and processes, morphology, taxonomy, physiology, ecology and diversity are covered in detail. Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Spring semester. Note: BIOL 120 and BIOL 121 are considered an introductory sequence for biology majors in both the biomedical and organismal concentrations in biology and are recommended for pre-professional students who desire an emphasis in biological sciences.

BIOL 201 Botany
A lecture and laboratory course that concentrates on the study of plant structure and function. Topics discussed include plant growth and development, metabolism, reproduction, and response to the environment. The principles of plant biotechnology are also introduced. Lectures emphasize plant physiology while lab exercises concentrate on plant morphology and structure (gross and microscopic examinations). Labs include some plant physiology and tissue culture experiences, introduction to taxonomy, and the major plant groups. Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Fall or spring semester.

BIOL 215 Human Anatomy and Physiology (Nursing students only)
A lecture and laboratory study of the structure and function of human cells, tissues, organs and body systems, designed for BCON nursing program students. The lecture portion of the course will emphasize the functions of and interactions amongst components of each level of organization in normal and diseased states. Laboratory sessions will concentrate on anatomical terminology, the histology and gross anatomy of tissues, organs and organ systems including human cadaver dissection and some measurement of physiological variables in human subjects across these systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 120.

BIOL 220 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
A lecture and laboratory course that includes a comparative study of vertebrate morphology with an emphasis on the functional significance of structure. A systemic approach is used beginning with an overview, principles of evolution and basic developmental biology. Laboratories involve dissecting representative organisms from the major vertebrate groups and studying skeletal preparations. Prerequisite: BIOL 121. Fall semester.

BIOL 228 Ecology
A lecture and laboratory course on the relationships of plants and animals to one another and to their biotic and physical environment. Field trips and laboratory work provide firsthand knowledge of organisms and their ecological significance in the De Pere area. Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in BIOL 121. Required for biology majors in the Organismal Biology concentration. Fall semester.

BIOL 244 Genetics (Required for all biology majors)
A lecture and laboratory course demonstrating the basic principles of gene structure, gene action and gene transmission as found in various organisms. Topics covered include DNA structure, replication, transcription and translation, recombinant DNA technology, bacterial genetics and genome structure. Laboratory exercises include DNA electrophoresis, PCR, bacterial transformation and inheritance in both Drosophila and plants. Prerequisites: grade of “C” or better in BIOL 120, BIOL 121.

BIOL 250 Introductory Microbiology (Nursing students only)
A lecture and laboratory course designed for students in the BCON nursing program dealing with the basics of microorganisms including bacteria, viruses and fungi. Topics covered include bacterial structure and function, metabolism, basic molecular biology, and the essentials of the host-microbe interaction. An emphasis is placed on aspects of microbiology important to the allied health professions. Laboratory work focuses on the culture, staining and identification of bacteria. Prerequisite: BIOL 120.

BIOL 310 Tropical Biology
A lecture and laboratory course designed to provide a sound foundation in ecological concepts and biology of tropical ecosystems around the world. The ecosystems to be studied include tropical dry forests, cloud forests, savannas, mangroves and coral reefs, but special emphasis will be placed on tropical rain forests. Nutrient cycles, production, trophic interactions, plant/animal interactions, biodiversity and conservation biology are discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 244 or instructor’s consent.

BIOL 320 Human Anatomy and Histology
A lecture and laboratory study of the gross anatomy and microscopic anatomy of the human body. The course uses a regional approach with emphasis on the upper limb, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, lower limb and brain. Students learn to identify muscles, nerves, vessels, organs and tissues of the human body. The laboratories involve cadaver dissections and light microscopy. One-third of the course includes information/laboratory work emphasizing human histology. Recommended for pre-professional students interested in health-related professions and students interested in medical illustration. Prerequisites: grade of “B” or better in BIOL 220, BIOL 372 and instructor’s consent. Spring semester.

BIOL 325 Developmental Biology
This course covers fundamental concepts and mechanisms of animal development. Students explore the underlying cellular and molecular basis for embryonic development and the role of various determinants, factors, and other biomolecules in cell movement, migration, differentiation and orientation. Developmental model systems (frog, chick, zebra fish, mouse, C. elegans, Drosophila) are used to explain both the commonality as well as the diversity of development. Labs combine classical embryology, observation of live animals as well as basic molecular techniques in development. Prerequisite: BIOL 244.

BIOL 338 Limnology
A lecture and laboratory course dealing with the physical, chemical and biological aspects of freshwater ecosystems and the interrelationships of organisms in these habitats. Field trips and laboratory experiences provide firsthand knowledge of aquatic organisms and their ecological significance. Prerequisite: BIOL 228. Fall semester, alternate years.

BIOL 350 Microbiology
A lecture and laboratory course dealing with the study of viruses, their interaction with their hosts and their effect on the environment. Themes include pathogenicity of viruses, vaccination and emerging viruses. In addition, a special topic relating to recent scientific findings will be chosen on a yearly basis. Lab includes the preparation of media, and the isolation, detection, cultivation, and characterization of viruses. Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in BIOL 244.

BIOL 353 Biotechnology in a Global Society
A lecture and discussion course that deals with advances and application of biotechnology in the context of the entire living world, both the society of human beings and the larger, living environment. Due in large part to the ability to clone genes, as well as many plants and animals, and to genetically engineer these organisms (perhaps even humans), biotechnology is revolutionizing both the means and pace of our intervention in the global community. Students become aware of the techniques and advances of biotechnology and are better prepared to make informed decisions about their application. This course also provides students with the necessary scientific background to understand the ethical problems posed by biotechnology. Infrequently offered.

BIOL 360 Medical Microbiology
A lecture and laboratory course dealing with the interaction between microbial pathogens and a eukaryotic host. Topics studied include the development and normal functioning of the immune system and allergic reactions and their relationship to microbial pathogens. A survey of the important bacteriological, mycological and viral pathogens in terms of their mechanisms of disease production is also included. Prerequisites: BIOL 350, CHEM 220.

BIOL 361 Virology
A lecture and laboratory course dealing with the study of bacterial and animal viruses. Themes include structure and pathogenicity of viruses, vaccination, and emerging viruses. In addition, a special topic relating to recent scientific findings will be chosen on a yearly basis. Labs include preparation of media, isolation and detection of viruses, and cultivation of and characterizing viruses. Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in BIOL 244.

BIOL 365 Immunology
A lecture and laboratory course dealing with the immune response of vertebrates with special emphasis on mammalian systems. The development and anatomy of the immune system, as well as the various cellular components (leukocytes) and proteins (cytokines, antibodies, complement proteins) are studied in detail. Topics covered include antigen presentation, T and B cell function, immunoglobulin structure and function, innate and acquired immune responses, granulocyte mediated responses, immunity to pathogens, various forms of hypersensitivity including allergies and autoimmune diseases, and applied topics such as transplantation immunity. Labs deal with induction and measurement of an immune response. Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in BIOL 244.

BIOL 368 Parasitology
A lecture and laboratory course dealing with eukaryotic disease-causing organisms, with special emphasis on pathogens of medical and veterinary significance. It deals with important human diseases including malaria, sleeping sickness, Leishmaniasis, as well as roundworm, tapeworm, fluke and arthropod diseases. The morphology, physiology, pathology and immunology of the various parasitic diseases are considered in detail. Labs emphasize morphology and diagnostics (morphological and molecular) and may include an experimental component. Prerequisites: BIOL 121 and BIOL 244. Every third year or by special arrangement.

BIOL 371 Cellular Physiology
A lecture and laboratory course concentrating on the structure and function of the eukaryotic cell. Topics covered include membrane structure and function, post-translational processing and transport of proteins, cell adhesion and communication, signal transduction pathways, the control of the cell cycle (cancer), and the tools/methods used in cellular-level studies. Prerequisites: BIOL 120, BIOL 244 and CHEM 220.

BIOL 372 Systemic Physiology
A lecture and laboratory course concentrating on the function of organ systems and their role in the entire organism. Emphasis is placed on integration and control mechanisms. Topics covered include neurophysiology, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and muscle physiology. Prerequisites: BIOL 121, BIOL 220, CHEM 220.

BIOL 373 Molecular Biology
A course involving an in-depth study of the organization and function of genes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The main themes of molecular genetics are emphasized. Topics discussed include DNA structure, organization, replication, transcription and control of gene expression. In addition to the text, readings from current literature are also assigned. Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in BIOL 244. Spring semester.

BIOL 375 The Biology of the Cancer Cell
This course will present the basic cell and molecular biology of cancer cells. The roles of signal transduction pathways, chemical carcinogens, oncogenes and viruses in carcinogenesis will be discussed. The processes of apoptosis, angiogenesis and metastasis will also be covered. Strategies and mechanisms of cancer treatment will be introduced. The laboratory component of the course will involve the maintenance and use of cancer cell lines in guided laboratory exercises and an independent research project. Laboratory work will require some student availability outside of regularly scheduled laboratory time. Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in BIOL 244.

BIOL 385 Endocrinology
A lecture and laboratory course on hormones, the mechanisms by which hormones control cellular function, and the interactions among the endocrine and other body systems, especially the digestive and reproductive systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 372. Fall semester.

BIOL 386 Neuroscience
A lecture, laboratory and discussion course on the scientific study of the nervous system. Topics covered include a history of the field, nerve, and glial cell physiology, the evolution of neurotransmission, learning, and memory especially relating to sensitive periods, sexual differentiation of the nervous system, and nervous system disorders. Laboratory exercises will focus on histological techniques, immunohistochemical localization of components of neuroendocrine systems, neuroanatomy and gene expression patterns in rodents, and stereotaxic surgery. Current articles from the primary literature as well as those seminal to the field of neuroscience will be discussed. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and BIOL 121. BIOL 372 preferred. J-term or summer sessions.

BIOL 388 Mammalogy
A study of mammals with emphasis on principles of mammalian ecology, conservation and biodiversity. Topics include characteristics of mammals, classification, natural history, ecology, biodiversity, conservation and techniques in field study. Special emphasis will be given to mammals residing in Northeastern Wisconsin. Prerequisite: BIOL 121.

BIOL 390 Ichthyology
A lecture and laboratory course on the classification, morphology, physiology and ecology of fish. Laboratory activities include individual student projects and the collection and identification of Wisconsin fish. Prerequisite: BIOL 121. Every third year or by special arrangement.

BIOL 428 Advanced Ecology
A course involving an original student laboratory and/or field investigation of an ecological or related problem, under faculty supervision, culminating in a final research thesis. Prerequisites: BIOL 228 and instructor’s consent.

BIOL 430 Paleobiology
A lecture and laboratory course exploring the evolutionary history of invertebrates and vertebrates by studying fossils and geology. Prerequisite: BIOL 121 or GEOL 105. Alternate years.

BIOL 460 Biology Seminar
An in-depth study of biologically oriented topics in an area not usually covered by scheduled courses. Emphasis will be on current literature with student independent study and presentations. Prerequisites: BIOL 244 and instructor’s consent.

BIOL 489 Special Topics
A course designed for group study of subject matter of special interest. The organization, methodology, and objective of the course will be determined by the instructor and may include a laboratory experience. Prerequisite: junior and senior biology majors or instructor’s consent.

BIOL 490 Independent Study
A course that allows students to pursue an area of study on an individual basis with consultation and evaluation. The methodology and objective will be mutually agreed upon by a faculty member and the student. Prerequisites: junior and senior biology majors, instructor’s consent, and approval of the associate dean of natural sciences.

BIOL 492 Directed Research
A course that allows a student to conduct research under the direction of a faculty member, usually as a continuation of BIOL 490. Prerequisites: junior standing, instructor’s consent and approval of the associate dean of natural sciences.

BIOL 496 Research and Thesis
Original student laboratory and/or field research of a biological problem under faculty supervision, culminating in a bachelor’s thesis when approved. The student interested in research will seek a staff member willing to direct the work. The student will submit to his or her prospective research director a written proposal of the project. The staff member then forms a committee which he or she will chair with two other faculty members to consider the student’s research proposal and the merit of research accomplished, to approve the preparation of a thesis, and to recommend acceptance of the thesis to the discipline (or division when inter-disciplinary). Approval of the student research proposal should be received no later than the end of the student’s junior year. The student will present his or her work in a public forum at a time set by his or her committee Prerequisites: biology major and instructor’s consent.

Business Administration

BUAD 142 Computer Applications in Business
This course focuses on the use of information technology in business. Specifically, this course will help students understand basic information technology terminology and concepts; demonstrate competency in using the computer and business application software; apply knowledge and understanding of information technology to solve real world business problems; analyze and use the information provided by information technology; evaluate the use of emerging information technology in shaping new processes, strategies and business models, and critique the ethical implications of information technology. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or placement beyond MATH 102.

BUAD 210 Business Ethics (2 credits)
This course examines the role and purpose of ethics in business. Students are exposed to methods and frameworks for moral reasoning and for resolving ethical dilemmas. Students will also learn about the concept of corporate social responsibility and explore its relevance to ethical business activities and obligations. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

BUAD 215 Entrepreneurship (Core: IS)
Develop your skills as a passionate, motivated entrepreneur. If you already have an idea that you want to grow, this course can help make that happen. Don't have an idea? You'll learn how to identify opportunities and how to act on them.  You will learn how to create and build your venture.  You will also discover how your business idea fits into the broader society. This course is based on the theme, “act, learn, build,” therefore, classroom meetings are active learning experiences. Students will acquire an understanding of the entrepreneurial process - a process of opportunity recognition, resource gathering, and team building, all driven by business methodologies in idea generation, feasibility analysis, and business plan creation. Fall semester.

BUAD 231 Introduction to Organizational Behavior (2 credits)
Organizational behavior is a field of study that investigates the impact that individuals, groups and structures have on behavior within organizations for the purpose of applying such knowledge toward improving an organization’s effectiveness. Topics include motivation of individuals and groups, group dynamics, leadership and influence processes, the exercise of social power and authority in groups, formal and informal organization, and the social and ethical context of decision-making processes. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

BUAD 232 Introduction to Human Resource Management (2 credits)
This course provides a basic examination of the human resource function. Participants will examine topic areas including human resource planning, employment law, staffing, training and development, performance management, total rewards and compensation, and employee relations. The course includes readings, lectures, class discussions and application activities. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

BUAD 233  Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain Management (2 credits)
This course introduces students to the effective management of resources and activities that produce or deliver goods and services in manufacturing and service organizations. This includes the effective management of people, materials, equipment, and processes that businesses need to design, produce, and deliver goods and services. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

BUAD 256 Personal Finance
Introduction to the basic financial and economic decisions made by nearly all individuals and families over the course of a lifetime. Includes some basic keys to investing wisely, purchasing a home, buying the appropriate amount of insurance, obtaining credit, managing your payment account and planning for future financial security. Although open to students majoring in business, this course may not be counted as an advanced requirement in the business administration major. Prerequisites: MATH 115 and sophomore standing. Infrequently offered.

BUAD 262 Introduction to International Business
The course will introduce students to the international business environment, including the political, social, economic and cultural dimensions of foreign countries. Students are also expected to participate in the operation of Discoveries International, a not-for-profit corporation on campus managed by students. Prerequisite: sophomore standing, IBLAS or Business major. Spring semester.

BUAD 270 Marketing Concepts and Issues
Introduction to marketing as an essential business function. Covers the role of marketing in companies, the marketing mix and its management, and selected platforms such as marketing internationally and on the Internet. Emphasizes responsible decision-making within regard to various constituents. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

BUAD 284 Statistics for Business and Economics
Introduction to the basic statistical concepts and techniques used to analyze data in business and economics. Covers descriptive and inferential statistics, probability and probability distributions, sampling and estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation analysis, and other selected topics. Includes statistical software applications. Prerequisite: MATH 124 or MATH 128 or MATH 131.

BUAD 333 Operations Management
This course is a survey of relevant quantitative techniques and decision-support systems for use in managerial systems, all within the context of a total quality management and a supply chain operations context. Topics include broad-based descriptions of models and quantitative techniques, and actual applications and manipulations of various quantitative models through computer applications. Specific models such as forecasting, logistics and materials management, facility design and location, project management and control, resource allocation, waiting line, statistical process control and work measurement, simulation and design are presented. Prerequisites: BUAD 233, BUAD 284. Alternate years.

BUAD 334 Supply Chain Management
This course deals with the effective management of resources and activities that produce or deliver goods and services in manufacturing and service organizations. This includes the effective management of people, materials, equipment, and processes that businesses need to design, produce, and deliver goods and services. Prerequisite: BUAD 233.

BUAD 336 Introduction to Human Resource Management
This course focuses on the individual as the unit of analysis. Introduces the basic psychological issues of motivation, testing and the measurement of human potential and performance. Considers the personnel functions of human resource planning, job description and specification, recruitment, selection, Equal Employment Opportunity, orientation and training, occupational health and safety, wage and salary compensation, fringe benefits, performance review and appraisal, discipline, and separation. It studies the history and background of the labor movement, union organizational activities, and contract negotiation and administration. Prerequisites: BUAD 231, BUAD 232, BUAD 284. Fall semester.

BUAD 337 Behavior in Organizations
This behavioral course focuses on the micro-level of group behavior as a management concern. Topics include motivation of individuals and groups, group dynamics, leadership and influence processes, the exercise of social power and authority in groups, formal and informal organization, and the social and ethical context of decision-making processes. Elements of behavioral theory and research are presented. Prerequisite: BUAD 231, BUAD 232.

BUAD 338 Organizational Theory and Practice
This course focuses on the macro-level of organization as a concern of management and elaborates upon the principles of management and the administrative approach to management. Topics include organizational goals, boundaries, size and structure, and the environmental factors and technological considerations that affect organizations. Bureaucratic, environmental and technological theories of organization; classical line, staff, functional and matrix organizational designs; and contemporary organic concepts are presented. Students learn to analyze the design of organizations and to assess the impact of such designs on the performance of the organizations. Prerequisite: BUAD 231 or instructor’s consent.

BUAD / CSCI 345 Business Applications Using Systems Analysis and Design
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of systems analysis and design in business applications. The students completing this course should be able to identify and analyze business problems and create solutions using systems analysis and design techniques, evaluate and choose appropriate software tools, and create design documents that can be used to implement the system. Students will also learn about user interface design, database design, systems architecture and implementation, systems operation, support, and security. Prerequisite: BUAD 142, or computer science major. Alternate years.

BUAD 350 Corporate Finance
As an introductory course in finance, this course acquaints students with the fundamental tools and concepts used in financial decision-making and financial management. In addition to an overview of the financial system, this course covers discounted cash flow analysis, financial ratio analysis, security valuation, risk and return, financial forecasting, capital budgeting, capital structure and other selected topics including international dimensions of finance. Prerequisites: ACCT 205, ECON 102, BUAD 128 or MATH 321 or SSCI 224.

BUAD 351 Investments
This course acquaints students with various types of investments, why individuals invest, and how individuals invest. As such, the intent is to provide the fundamental concepts, theories and techniques of investing in financial assets including stocks, bonds, mutual funds and derivatives. The course also introduces students to the area of portfolio management. The global aspect of investing will also be discussed. This course provides the opportunity for students to experience hands-on investing through managing an online portfolio. Prerequisite: BUAD 350. Fall semester.

BUAD 352 Financial Institutions and Markets
This course will provide a conceptual and practical overview of financial institutions and markets. Students will study the financial management of bank and non-bank financial institutions. Emphasis will be placed on studying the major trends and problems faced by these institutions, both on a national and an international level. Attention will also be given to money and capital markets and to the role and determinants of interest rates. Prerequisite or co-requisite: BUAD 350.  Note: Students may not get credit for both BUAD 352 and ECON 390.

BUAD 355 Advanced Financial Management
An in-depth analysis of the financial manager’s decision-making role. Through use of the case method, students are faced with realistic problems that permit them to apply financial theory as well as utilize and enhance the problem-solving skills developed in previous courses. Student groups prepare written case reports and make case presentations. Prerequisite: BUAD 350.

BUAD 356 Risk Management and Insurance
The course begins with an exploration of the nature, sources, and measurement of risks. The course includes the evaluation of risks and the risk management process; both noninsurance and insurance solutions to the risk management problem are considered. Applications include risks faced by auto owners, homeowners, ad individuals in terms of life and health risks. Finally, the course will cover the insurance industry. Students will learn about the various types of insurers, the functions of insurers, and the regulation of the insurance industry. Prerequisite: junior standing.

BUAD 371 Sales Management
This course provides an integrated application of management and marketing principles to the corporate selling function. Concepts covered include demand forecasting, production planning, sales quota and territory assignments, consumer behavior, selling techniques, and sales force recruitment and supervision. Cases provide an integrative policy orientation to this course. Prerequisite: BUAD 270. Alternate years.

BUAD 372 Marketing Research
This course provides an introduction to marketing research as an essential marketing function. Covers the options and decisions to be made in finding problems, formulating research models, choosing research designs, collecting and evaluating data, and presenting results. The course consists of two integrated parts — learning about the institutions, tools and methods of marketing research and applying them to a practical research project. Prerequisites: BUAD 270, BUAD 284 or SSCI 224, or MATH 321.

BUAD 374 Marketing Promotions
Introduction to promotions as an essential marketing function. Study of promotional tools such as advertising, sales promotion, and public relations in the context of both traditional and electronic platforms. Both the development of promotion strategies and their implementation through various media are covered. Prerequisites: BUAD 270, BUAD 284 or SSCI 224 or MATH 321.

BUAD 375 Consumer Behavior
This course concentrates on the psychological and sociological aspects of the marketing function. Topics include motivation, learning and memory, socialization, attitude formation, and lifestyle expression. Prerequisite: BUAD 270, ECON 102.

BUAD 390 Business Law
Students will study basic principles of law as it relates to business. Topics include civil procedure, tort, contract, agency, employment, partnerships and corporations. Prerequisite: junior standing.

BUAD 400 Case Studies: Leaders in Film
This course examines the many ways leaders are portrayed in films and the implications of these portrayals for leadership in practice. Students will analyze and evaluate portrayals of leaders in film using a variety of theories and perspectives, including: traditional theories of leadership, personality and leadership, emotional intelligence and leadership, courage and moral leadership, team leadership, transformational leadership, visionary leadership, servant leadership, and gender and leadership. Prerequisites: grade of “D” or better in BUAD 230 or BUAD 231. Fall semester.

BUAD 410 Entrepreneurial Experience
The Entrepreneurial Experience is about acting upon a real entrepreneurial opportunity. Building on the foundation of BUAD 215, students will put their ideas into practice by developing and building on key action steps to advance their own venture or to advance projects for existing organizations. This process involves research that engages prospective customers, suppliers, stakeholders, experts, comparable and complementary ventures, and investors. Students are challenged to test ideas and gain a clearer understanding of the interdisciplinary complexities of the entrepreneurial environment.  Readings and cases will provide supplemental background. The class experience addresses how to build and lead an enterprising new venture. Students will set goals and action steps to move their venture forward, working with both external and internal mentors. Students will work independently as well as interdependently with other students in the course. Contact time for this course is divided between in-class sessions and out-of-class meetings with the instructor. Prerequisite: BUAD 215. Fall semester.

BUAD 436 Advanced Human Resource Management
This course is about both the design and execution of human resource management. This course has two central themes: how to think systematically and strategically about aspects of managing the organization’s human resources and what really needs to be done to implement these policies to achieve competitive advantage. It adopts the perspective of a general manager and addresses human resource topics including reward systems, performance management, high-performance human resource systems, training and development, recruitment, retention, Equal Employment Opportunity laws, workforce diversity, and union / management relationships from a strategic perspective. Prerequisite: BUAD 336. Alternate years.

BUAD 437 Compensation Management
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a solid understanding of the art of compensation practice and its role in promoting companies’ competitive advantages. Students examine the context of compensation practice, the criteria used to compensate employees, compensation design issues, employee benefits, and contemporary challenges that compensation professionals will face well into the 21st century. You will learn core compensation systems concepts and tools through lectures, assigned text readings, and other ancillary assignments. Prerequisite: BUAD 232, BUAD 284.

BUAD 438 Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Seminar
The students enrolling in this course will attend the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) annual conference in June, plus additional information sessions before and after the conference. This course offers an exciting and spectacular learning and networking experience. Most conference issues that will be addressed will be globally related, including sexual harassment, compensation planning, disabilities, flexible workplaces, global education, and legal perspectives, along with numerous other topics directly related to the HR body of knowledge. Details about the conference can be found at: http://annual.shrm.org/. There are additional fees (conference registration, hotel, airfare, etc.) beyond course registration. Prerequisite: BUAD 232.

BUAD 469 IBLAS Senior Seminar
These two capstone courses, required for all senior IBLAS majors, attempt to integrate the knowledge and skills derived from prerequisite courses in business, language, mathematics, political science and economics. The format includes lectures, oral presentations by students, visitors, panel discussions, field trips and visits to conferences, case analyses and hands-on responsibility for the student-run import retailing operation, Discoveries International. Prerequisite: senior IBLAS major, Global Business Concentration, or instructor’s consent. BUAD 468 fall semester and BUAD 469 spring semester. Prerequisite for BUAD 469: BUAD 468.

BUAD 471 Marketing Management and Strategy
This capstone course takes an analytical and a learning-by-doing approach to marketing with particular regard to strategic decisions. It deals with optimizing marketing management decisions by using quantitative tools. Among the issues covered are customer loyalty and relationship marketing, branding, product launch, pricing, promotion budgets, and customer-segment analysis. At the center of the course is the development of a hands-on semester project. Prerequisites: BUAD 270, BUAD 284.

BUAD 477 Knowledge Management (Adv. Core: IS)
This course is about the importance of embracing the ever-changing knowledge within organizations.  This course has two central themes: how to think about technological disruption as it pertains to organizations within industries, and individuals within organizations. It also explores how individuals deal with the psychological stress of change within organizations. Alternate years.

BUAD 485 Strategic Management Seminar
An integrated approach to strategic decision-making is taken through the use of such activities such as case studies, simulations and role-playing. Emphasis is placed on synthesizing the knowledge and skills derived from Accounting, Economics, Finance, Marketing and Management courses. Prerequisites: ACCT 206 or 315, BUAD 210, BUAD 231, BUAD 232, BUAD 233, BUAD 270, BUAD 350 and senior standing.

BUAD 486 Small Business Ventures
This is a seminar course offered whenever a mutual interest in a more specialized topic in business administration exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students. Pre: BUAD 206 or 315, 270, 350, and senior standing. Infrequently offered.

BUAD 489 Special Topics
This is a seminar course offered whenever a mutual interest in a more specialized topic in Business Administration exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students.

BUAD 490 Independent Study (2 or 4 credits)
Individual study of an approved topic in business under the direction of a Business faculty member. Permits faculty and students to explore together some subject of special or personal interest. Reading, tutorial discussion and written work are required. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent and approval of the associate dean of social sciences.

BUAD 492 Directed Research
Qualified students may perform business research projects under the supervision of a Business faculty member. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent and approval of associate dean of social sciences.

BUAD 494  Internship
Appropriate work experience with business firms or government agencies may be undertaken for course credit when directly related to the educational goals of the student. The work done or a description of the field experience is not sufficient for academic credit, there must also be evidence of reflective analysis and interpretation of the experience which relates it to the basic theory in related areas. Students must submit an Internship Course Application to the course instructor to be approved for academic credit before registering for the course. Prerequisite: business or accounting major, instructor approval, junior or senior standing. Note that the summer offering of this course is done online.

Graduate Courses
These courses are only available to graduate students.

BUAD 500 Fundamentals of Accounting and Finance (2 credits)
This course is an introductory study of the accounting and finance theories used while making business decisions. It assumes no prior accounting or finance knowledge. The two major learning objectives for the course are that students learn how to use the basic financial statements to make business decisions, and how to evaluate various business decisions using relevant quantitative and qualitative managerial accounting information. At the discretion of the dean of the Schneider School, the successful completion of relevant prior coursework in accounting and finance coursework may be substituted for completion of this course.

BUAD 510 Introduction to Business Leadership (1 credit)
This course provides a gateway experience for students entering the program. Through readings and case study analyses, faculty will build a sense of team/community among enrolled students. The concept of “leadership as vocation” will be introduced. In addition, students will learn about special features and requirements of the SNC MBA, and will learn about general expectations for graduate work.

BUAD 511 Leadership and Managing Organizational Change (3 credits)
This course prepares innovative leaders to put fresh ideas to work and do so responsibly. It will examine the skills and tools required to be a transformational, charismatic leader. Students will explore how successful leaders influence groups, understand behavior, and lead people toward the achievement and realization of the organizational vision. (Taken early in the program.)

BUAD 512 Business Ethics and Values-Based Leadership (3 credits)
This course examines the roles played by values and ethics in the many decisions faced by business organizations. Students will examine how their values are determined and how they inform responsible behavior in organizations. Further, the course will analyze the role of firms in promoting sustainability in the communities in which they operate. (Taken early in the program.)

BUAD 520 Managing in a Diverse Workplace (1.5 credits)
As organizations become increasingly diverse, managers must develop skills and sensitivities for leading effectively in such an environment. This course explores various forms of diversity in the workplace, including gender, race, generation, and cultural background. The focus is on acquiring the knowledge and skills to embrace and creatively engage this diversity to enhance both individual and organizational outcomes.

BUAD 521 Business Analytics (1.5 credits)
This course demonstrates the key facets of a complete measurement system that creates a measurement mindset, builds a measurement skillset, and provides a measurement toolset. Using case studies, it will introduce key deliverables to a measurement system and the pre-requisites. Spring semester.

BUAD 522 Economics for Managers (3 credits)
This course is primarily focused on applied microeconomics for business decision-­making, covering topics such as market analysis and price determination, cost determination, and demand analysis. The course will also provide students with an introduction to the macroeconomic variables that managers should understand in order to assess changes in the business environment.

BUAD 523 Strategic Marketing (3 credits)
This course takes a strategic and analytical approach to the study of consumers, products and markets. Attention focuses on the recognition of opportunities, the development of marketing strategies, and the design of an effective marketing mix both for consumer and business markets. Work with simulations makes participants aware of the financial impact of marketing strategies.

BUAD 524 Financial Management (3 credits)
This courses focuses on the major financial decisions faced by organizations as they look to enhance firm value. Students will develop various tools of financial analysis and apply them to the major decision areas such as the investment decision (capital budgeting), the financing decision (capital structure) and working capital management.

BUAD 525 Managing People, Teams and Projects (3 credits)
This course examines the design and implementation of management practices for aligning human resource practices and the strategic intent of the organization. Similarly, the challenge of managing groups and teams will be addressed. In addition, project-management fundamentals and principles from the standpoint of the manager who must organize, plan, implement and control non-routine activities to achieve schedule, budget and performance objectives will be explored.

BUAD 526 Managing Operations, Systems and Processes (3 credits)
This course focuses on how to use operations and systems to gain strategic advantage. Transforming inputs into outputs and using information to improve that transformation are the keys to the success of firms – from manufacturers managing their supply chain to service providers.

BUAD 527 Global Strategy and Venturing (3 credits)
Managers make significant strategic decisions as part of their jobs as they seek to grow a business. Such decisions may include developing and introducing a new product or process, acquiring another firm, responding to a competitor or to a crisis, forming a strategic alliance, or entering a new market. These decisions are complex and must take all business functions (finance, marketing, human resource management, operations) into consideration.

BUAD 528 Building Intellectual Property Portfolios (1.5 cr)
This course will cover the four types of intellectual property and how these assets may be created and exploited by individuals and businesses.  Each type of intellectual property asset will be discussed separately, including how to identify and how to protect each one.  Then the course will focus on combining and coordinating these different assets to build a robust and valuable intellectual property portfolio.  Strategies for individual creators, start-ups and on-going enterprises will be discussed. Summer sessions.

Chemistry

CHEM 100 Applications of Chemistry (Core: PN)
This course is primarily designed as a terminal course for non-science majors but is open to all students. Many of the traditional chemical theories will be presented but always in association with a topic of everyday interest. The selection and sequence of topics will vary with the instructor and times. Labs illustrating applications will be carried out where appropriate. A student who has received credit for CHEM 105 or CHEM 107 may not take CHEM 100 for credit without the registrar’s consent.

CHEM 105 General Chemistry 1 (Core: PN)
This course outlines the basic principles, laws and definitions of chemistry. Students will also learn atomic theory and basic reaction chemistry. Gas laws and enthalpy are also introduced. Laboratory work consists of experiments illustrating the above and an introduction to basic laboratory techniques. Course consists of both weekly lectures and scheduled laboratory. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry. Student must test into a math class higher than MATH 102 to enroll. Fall semester.

CHEM 107 General Chemistry 2
This course is a continuation of the topics presented in CHEM 105. Emphasis will be on the study of ions in solutions and chemical equilibria. Both chemical kinetics and thermodynamics will be covered. Course consists of weekly lectures and scheduled laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM 105 or instructor’s consent. Spring semester.

CHEM 211 Analytical Chemistry
An introductory course in the principles of quantitative techniques and calculations. Topics include statistics, acid-base chemistry, as well as acid-base, complexation and EDTA titrations. The weekly laboratory experiments are selected to provide experience in the analytical methods described in the lecture. Prerequisite: CHEM 107. Spring semester.

CHEM 220 Organic Chemistry
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic language of organic chemistry. Selected topics include organic nomenclature, orbital hybridization, stereochemistry, and the chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes and a few common instrumental methods (NMR, IR and GC-MS). Success in this course will depend on students’ abilities to engage in a process that requires applying basic principles to the analysis of complex problems. Four lectures, one lab per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 107. Fall semester.

CHEM 222 Organic Chemistry: Intermediate
This course is intended for, but not limited to, students who are completing majors outside of Chemistry (e.g. Biology, Environmental Science or Natural Science). Selected topics include redox chemistry, carbonyl chemistry, aromatics, cycloadditions and the applications of instrumental methods (NMR, IR, GC-MS). In addition, select topics in bioorganic chemistry will be covered that serve to illustrate the application of mechanistic organic chemistry to the solution of problems of biochemical or medicinal interest. The lab component of the course will serve to reinforce topics discussed during the lectures. Prerequisite: CHEM 220.

CHEM 232 Organic Chemistry: Research Emphasis
This course is intended for, but not limited to, students who are completing a major in Chemistry, including those pursuing the Biochemistry concentration in the major. Selected topics include redox chemistry, carbonyl chemistry, aromatics, cycloadditions and a few common instrumental methods (NMR, IR, GC-MS). The course will have an expanded, project-based laboratory. Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in CHEM 220.

CHEM 302 Environmental Chemistry
This course uses the principles of chemistry to understand natural systems and assess human impact on these systems. Lecture topics will include atmospheric chemistry, the chemistry of natural aqueous systems, data collection and interpretation, and the chemistry of pollutants such as anthropogenic organic compounds and heavy metals. The laboratory aspect of the course will focus on analytical techniques commonly used in environmental analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 107.

CHEM 305 Inorganic Chemistry
An in-depth study of properties, structures, bonding and reactions of inorganic compounds. Topics include molecular orbital theory, organometallics, coordination chemistry and catalysis. The weekly laboratory is designed to provide students with experience in inorganic synthesis and representative analytical methods of inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 211 and either CHEM 222 or CHEM 232.

CHEM 307 Bioorganic Chemistry
An advanced special topics course in organic chemistry with emphasis on the mechanistic aspects of biomolecular action and drug design. Topics of discussion include anti-tumor agents, antibiotics, cholesterol-regulating agents, coenzymes and catalytic antibodies. Prerequisite: CHEM 222 or CHEM 232. Summer session, alternate years.

CHEM 310 Organic Chemistry: Advanced
A study of modern methods for the asymmetric synthesis of organic compounds with emphasis on reaction mechanisms. Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in CHEM 222 or CHEM 232.

CHEM 330 Physical Chemistry 1
The first semester of a yearlong sequence utilizing the mathematical approach in the study of chemistry. Topics include the first, second and third laws of thermodynamics, the thermodynamics of ideal and real solutions, and an introduction to solution and gas phase kinetics. The laboratory experiments involve the application of these concepts to calorimetry, spectroscopy, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics and chemical equilibrium. Prerequisite: CHEM 211 and CHEM 222 or CHEM 232, MATH 132, PHYS 122 or (with instructor’s consent) PHYS 112. Fall semester.

CHEM 332 Physical Chemistry 2
The second semester of the yearlong sequence introduces the concepts of quantum theory of atoms and molecules. The development of quantum mechanics is traced from the Bohr model of the atom to modern applications of computational chemistry. In the laboratory, students use computational chemistry and spectroscopy to illustrate the theoretical and mathematical concepts developed in the course. Prerequisite: CHEM 330. Spring semester.

CHEM 350 Biochemistry 1
The first half of the course covers the chemistry of carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Particular attention is given to enzyme kinetics and other methods available to study protein structure and function. The second half of the course focuses on bioenergetics and metabolism. Glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the pentose phosphate pathway, citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation are covered in detail. Weekly experiments are selected to provide experience in modern biochemical lab techniques. Students must present a paper published in the primary literature to their peers. Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in BIOL 244 (or instructor’s consent) and “C” or better in CHEM 222 or 232.

CHEM 351 Biochemistry 2
This course is designed as a continuation of CHEM 350. Topics include metabolism of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, integration and regulation of metabolism and photosynthesis. Students are expected to read and discuss current publications from the primary literature. In addition, students must write a review article on an approved topic of their choice and present their findings to the class. The laboratory component of this course focuses on recombinant protein technologies. Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in CHEM 350. Spring semester, alternate years.

CHEM 389 Special Topics
Lecture, laboratory and/or literature studies at an advanced level. The intent is to provide students with the opportunity to increase their understanding of chemistry beyond the scope of the basic core courses. Representative topics include areas such as advanced biochemistry, organometallic chemistry, polymer chemistry and heterocyclic chemistry. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent.

CHEM 490 Independent Study (2 or 4 credits)
A course that allows students to pursue research on an individual basis under the direction of a faculty member in Chemistry. The specific topic of study is mutually agreed upon by the student and the faculty member directing the research. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent and approval of the associate dean of natural sciences.

CHEM 492 Directed Research (2 or 4 credits)
An independent study course involving laboratory experiences under the direction of a faculty member in Chemistry. A written report is due two weeks before the end of class. Students who wish to use a summer research experience performed at a site other than St. Norbert College as a substitute for CHEM 492 must have the discipline’s approval prior to undertaking the activity. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent.

Chinese

CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese 1 (Core: SL)
An intensive introduction to standard Chinese with an emphasis placed on the four language skills: understanding, speaking, reading and writing. Required laboratory practice. Fall semester.

CHIN 102 Elementary Chinese 2 (Core: SL)
Continuation of CHIN 101. Prerequisite: CHIN 101. Spring semester.

Classical Studies

CLAS / LATN 101 Elementary Latin
An introduction to classical Latin with emphasis on the grammar, syntax and vocabulary necessary for reading Latin prose and poetry. The course also stresses the influence of Latin on English vocabulary. Fall semester.

CLAS / LATN 102 Intermediate Latin (Core: SL)
A continuation of CLAS 101, with extended reading passages in Latin prose and poetry. Prerequisite: CLAS 101. Spring semester.

CLAS / GREK 111 Elementary Greek 1
An introduction to Attic Greek with emphasis on the grammar, syntax and vocabulary necessary for reading Greek prose and poetry. Fall semester.

CLAS / GREK 112 Elementary Greek 2 (Core: SL)
A continuation of CLAS 111, with extended reading passages in Greek prose and poetry. Prerequisite: CLAS 111. Spring semester.

CLAS / LATN 203 Readings in Latin (Core: SL)
After learning more about Latin grammar, students will translate a variety of texts that will bring them in touch with the rich humanity of thoughtful human beings who lived 2000 years ago; authors considered will include Catullus, Cicero, Horace and Pliny. Prerequisite: CLAS 102. Fall semester.

CLAS / LATN 204 Advanced Reading in Latin (Core: SL)
This course will continue to develop proficiency in Latin vocabulary and grammar through readings of Latin literature selected by the students. The course will assist students incorporating the Latin language and the skills developed in previous Latin courses into their daily lives and chosen career paths. Prerequisite: CLAS 203.

CLAS / PHIL 207 Greek Philosophy
A study of the ancient Greek thinkers who initiated Western philosophy. The course begins with the pre-Socratic philosophers and then focuses on Plato and Aristotle. Fall semester.

CLAS / PHIL 209 Hellenistic Philosophy
The course introduces students to the three major schools of Hellenistic philosophy that dominated Greek thought after Aristotle (Skepticism, Stoicism and Epicureanism) and their respective attempts to refine or reject the classical conception of the good life. Students explore principally the ethical implications of the Hellenistic movement, though certain issues in metaphysics and epistemology are covered as well.

CLAS / GREK 213 Intermediate Greek (Core: SL)
Continued study of grammar, syntax and vocabulary of Greek prose and poetry. Readings may include selections from Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato or early Christian texts. Prerequisite: CLAS 112. Fall semester.

CLAS / PHIL / POLI 314 Classical and Medieval Political Thought
An examination of the political theories of major ancient and medieval thinkers, with primary emphasis on the writings of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas. Students will investigate issues such as the origin, nature, and purpose of political societies, the types of political constitutions, the concepts of rulership and authority, the meaning of citizenship, and the relation of the individual to society. Fall semester, alternate years.

CLAS / WOLT 325 Classical Mythology (Adv. Core: WT)
This course will study both Greek and Roman mythology in their literary and cultural contexts. The course will consider the meanings, purposes and universality of various myths, such as the stories of Prometheus, Orpheus, Oedipus and Aeneas. It may also include comparative elements, touching, for example, Norse, Celtic and American Indian myths.

CLAS / HIST 326 The History of Ancient Greece
This course explores ancient Greek civilization from its dawn in the second millennium B.C. to its absorption by the Roman Empire in the third century B.C. Key themes will include: tyranny and democracy; innovations in philosophy and science; competition through warfare and athletics; mythology, poetry and history; and new standards in art and architecture. This course seeks to illustrate how different our world would be without the vibrant and creative culture of ancient Greece. Fall semester, alternate years.

CLAS / THRS 327 Ancient Wisdom and the Modern Search for Meaning (Adv. Core: CI)
What is the good life? What can a person truly know? Is there justice in the world? These are some of the fundamental, universal questions of the human condition. This course will raise these questions and look at how the biblical wisdom literature answers them along with similar writings from elsewhere in the ancient world as well as modern literature and film. As a result of this analysis, students will have the opportunity to construct a coherent and viable structure of meaning for their own life journeys.

CLAS / HIST 328 The History of Ancient Rome
This course is an exploration of Roman civilization from its origin in a tiny Italian village in the eighth century B.C. to the decline of its vast empire in the fifth century A.D. Key themes include political, administrative and legal achievements; conquest, imperialism and multiculturalism; the shift from republic to empire; daily life in town and country; the impact of Christianity; architecture and urbanism. This course is designed to provide students with a firm grounding in the Roman experience and a keen awareness of what we today owe the Romans of the distant past. Spring semester, alternate years.

CLAS / PHIL 334 Tragedy and Philosophy (Adv. Core EI)
A study of tragedy as a dramatic and literary form, and the different Western philosophical theories of tragedy inspired by that art form. One half of the course concentrates on Greek tragedy (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides) and its commentators, both ancient (Plato, Aristotle) and modern. The second half examines both Renaissance and modern examples of the tragic tradition with contemporary philosophical readings on the significance of that tradition. Spring semester, alternate years.

CLAS 335 A Brief History of Body Parts (Adv. Core: BB)
The course traces the impact of ancient medical thought on modern medical theory and practice, studying how concepts foundational to modern medicine got their start in the classical world. Such concepts include not only certain anatomical structures and physiological functions, but the very idea of anatomy itself — literally a “dividing up” of the body into parts — as the basis for a naturalistic understanding of health and disease and ultimately for the therapeutic approaches characteristic of Western medicine.

CLAS 490 Independent Study (2 or 4 credits)
This course allows a student and instructor to read a major classical author or text of particular interest. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent and approval of the associate dean of humanities.

Communication and Media Studies

COME 122 Principles of Interpersonal Communication
Develops basic principles, characteristics, types and summary propositions of personal communication. Examines the relationships between concepts such as language, perceptions, self-concept, listening and values in their bearing upon personal communication.

COME 124 Principles of Mass Communication
Development and application of basic communication principles in mass media. Examination of a variety of media — print, film, electronic.

COME 222 Small Group Communication
Develops basic communication concepts with application to small group decision-making. Explores role behavior and leadership, problem solving, conformity and deviance, individual and group behavior, risk, size and other variables that influence small group communication. Prerequisite: COME 122. Spring semester.

COME 252 Writing for Media
An intensive writing course designed to introduce print and broadcast, and web writing styles and conventions. Covers style rules, editing, lead writing, libel law, story construction, interviewing, rewriting and other topics. Prerequisite: COME 124.

COME 310 Race/Ethnicity and Media (Adv. Core: DD)
How are individuals of different racial and ethnic groups represented in media? What impacts do these representations have on media viewers? This course will explore these questions and more from multiple scholarly perspectives. Various forms of media such as advertising, television, movies, video games, and news will be considered. Summer sessions.

COME 315 Conflict Communication
Conflict Communication examines the forces that generate and influence conflicts, and the techniques that can be used to direct these forces toward productive outcomes.  We will discuss constructive and destructive conflict, analyze a conflict de-escalation model called the third side, and review a variety of topics relating to conflict in our interpersonal relationships and in our world. Prerequisite: COME 122. Fall semester, alternate years.

COME 322 Business and Professional Speaking
Study and practice in three areas of communication that most business and professional people encounter within organizations: speaking to groups - the theory and practice of clearly presenting information and ideas; speaking one-on-one – the theory and practice of interviewing, job selection, application, and professional relationship building; and leadership abilities – the theory and practice of effective leadership practices. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

COME 323 Nonverbal Communication
An examination of theory and research in several non-linguistic codes and the effects on human communication behavior. Topic areas covered include touch, movement, space, vocal characteristics and appearance. Prerequisite: COME 122.

COME 324 Persuasion
Examines theoretical and practical applications of persuasive communication. Students are exposed to traditional theories of persuasion and to current trends in empirical persuasion research. Students construct and deliver persuasive messages in group and individual settings. Prerequisite: COME 122. Fall semester.

COME 325 Trends in the Modern Workplace
Social media at work? Google Glass in customer service encounters? This course will explore current and predicted trends in organizational uses of communication technologies. More specifically, students will examine the increasing presence of communication technologies in the workplace and practice online teamwork skills to conceptualize and execute a final project. The course will also allow students to anticipate potential challenges and construct future career plans by mapping and tracking workplace trends in their chosen areas of study. Summer sessions.

COME 327 Health Communication
Examines effects of a wide range of factors that influence interactions and behaviors of individuals and organizations in the context of communicating health. Those primary factors are individual traits, race and gender, affects and emotions, empowerment, efficacy, social support, technology, crisis, and culture. The interdisciplinary approach of the course covers various theories in interpersonal, intercultural and mass communication.

COME 328 Family Communication
This course examines the ever-changing nature of families and the role communication plays in creating and maintaining family relationships. Topics will be developed through critical examination and application of social scientific research and theory. Specific issues explored include family member roles, family types, and current issues (e.g., secrets, conflict, divorce) that impact families.

COME / POLI 329 Political Communication (Adv. Core: WT)
This course uses rhetorical theory and criticism, as well as empirical evidence concerning the content and effects of political messages, to aid citizens in becoming better consumers and critics of political communication. Political speeches, political advertisements, political debates, and political media will be explored in the context of both primary and general election campaigns. Fall semester.

COME 330 Intercultural Communication (Adv. Core: DD)
This course focuses on the concepts necessary to understand people from other cultures, their patterns of communication and our interactions with them. Cultural, sociocultural and psycho-cultural influences on the communication process are studied. Fall semester.

COME / WMGS 331 Gender and Media
Why are some genres of media labeled as feminine or masculine? How are men and women represented in media? What impacts do these representations have on media viewers? This course will explore these questions and more from multiple scholarly perspectives. Various forms of media such as advertising, television, movies, video games, and news will be considered. Fall semester. 

COME 364 Media Law and Regulation
Consideration of federal regulations and regulatory practices. Current issues in changing policies. Some Supreme Court decisions and their effects on the media. Fall semester.

COME 380 Communication Research Methods (for Communication Majors)
This course utilizes a communication research lens to identify and explore human behavior. Students will learn the process of conducting research by considering research ethics, interpreting research findings for practical application, and becoming familiar with measurement, sampling, and data collection techniques. The course will demonstrate how theory and research work together to answer important questions about human communication behaviors, and provide a platform for students to develop their own research questions.

COME 383 Media Ethics
Those who work in media face growing ethical dilemmas and this course will explore them and their possible solutions while providing an appreciation for the complexities of media structures and purposes. Spring semester.

COME 384 Communication Technology and Social Change
Students in this course will consider how new and social media influence culture, politics, commerce, identity, and relationships. The course uses both old and new theories of communication and media studies to understand how power and influence are asserted and resisted in digital spaces. The course adopts a digital storytelling perspective for developing expertise about new media campaigns. Spring semester.

COME 389 Special Topics
This course concentrates on a topic pertaining to the current needs and interests of faculty and students. The topics covered will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in the timetable of courses whenever the course is offered.

COME 426 Organizational Communication
A study of organizational communication theory and research. Traces development of current organizational communication perspectives, examines potential constraints and barriers to effective communication in organizations, and studies communication processes both within and between organizational components. Prerequisites: COME 122 and senior standing. Fall semester.

COME 427 Communication Theory
Examines the various ways of approaching the study of communication processes. Focuses on the historical development of theoretical perspectives with emphasis on significant research trends that influence the understanding of communication. Prerequisites: COME 122 and senior standing. Spring semester.

COME 467 Media Criticism
Applies classical critical approaches to the study of media content. In addition to approaches such as genre studies, ideological criticism, and feminist studies, the course considers economic and cultural factors that affect content. The ultimate goal of the course is to generate alternative perspectives about dominant media texts. Prerequisites: COME 124 and senior standing. Spring semester.

COME 468 Mass Communication Theory
Explores empirical approaches to the investigation of mass communication. Some of the topics that will be discussed include: the history of mass media research, mass communication theories, and qualitative and quantitative research methods. Prerequisites: COME 124 and senior standing. Fall semester.

COME 490 Independent Study
A course allowing students and faculty to explore topics of special interest together. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and approval by the associate dean of humanities.

COME 494 Internship
This internship experience allows students to apply their studies in a supervised work situation. Students benefit from an inside look at different kinds of organizations, a chance to work in their field of study, and gain experience with state-of-the-art equipment and practices. Junior/senior standing. Does not fulfill a 400 level requirement for the major.

Computer Science

CSCI 110 Introduction to Computer Programming (Core: QR)
A lecture and laboratory course which provides an introduction to structured and object-oriented programming using the language C++. Topics include the role of a stored program, problem definition, algorithm design, coding and testing, and documentation as well as functions, parameters, control structures, arrays, structs, file streams and the use of standard objects. Applications are taught through classroom examples, laboratory exercises and programming assignments. Structured programming and top-down design are emphasized throughout the course. Weekly laboratory sessions reinforce programming techniques and the process of program design. Co-requisite or prerequisite: MATH 115.

CSCI 150 Applications of Discrete Structures (Core: QR)
Discrete structures are sets of distinct or unconnected elements. These structures are useful when solving problems that require counting objects, exploring the relationship between finite sets, and analyzing an algorithm (a finite sequence of steps) for its effectiveness and efficiency. Discrete structures can be used to answer questions in a variety of disciplines. In this course students learn techniques for solving problems and defending their solutions while improving their ability to think logically, algorithmically, and quantitatively. Weekly laboratory sessions provide opportunities for students to analyze problems and experiment with their solutions. This is not a programming course. Prerequisite: Completion of or placement above MATH 115. Spring semester.  

CSCI 205 Software Engineering and Elementary Data Structures
A continuation of CSCI 110, this lecture and laboratory course introduces elementary data structures and advanced programming concepts needed to solve more challenging problems. Software engineering principles and object-oriented concepts are studied and applied to various types of problems. Object-oriented topics include class inheritance, encapsulation, polymorphism, error handling and error recovery. Additional topics include dynamic memory, pointers, linked lists, stacks, recursion, activation records and binary files. Special focus is given to software engineering principles including abstraction, modularity, generality, portability, robustness, and internal and external documentation. Laboratory sessions reinforce concepts presented in lecture sessions, introduce methods of experimentation and present new concepts. Prerequisite: CSCI 110.

CSCI 220 Advanced Data and File Structures
A continuation of CSCI 205, this lecture and laboratory course focuses on advanced data structures and the analysis of their performance. After reviewing pointers, linked lists, stacks and recursion, the following topics and their associated algorithms are studied in detail: multi-linked lists, simulating recursion, queues, trees and graphs. Advanced sorting and searching algorithms are also analyzed. Some file structures such as B-trees and hash files are studied. Labs and assignments are used for experimentation, to present new algorithms and concepts, to analyze and compare algorithms, and to reinforce lecture material. Students apply their knowledge to new problems, developing solutions by extending or enhancing various algorithms. Prerequisites: CSCI 205 and either CSCI 150 or MATH 250. Spring semester.

CSCI 225 Machine Organization and Assembly Language
This lecture and laboratory course provides an introduction to the internal operations of digital computers. Topics include computer architecture, memory control, processing, I/O devices, machine language, microcode, instruction types and format, fetch-execute cycle, timing, I/O operations, interrupt handling, data representation, basic computer arithmetic, addressing modes and assembly language programming. Weekly laboratories will extend concepts discussed in lectures and focus on using the computer as an experimental tool. Working in teams, students will research a topic in computing, design a web site describing their findings and formally present their results. Prerequisite: CSCI 205. Fall semester.

CSCI 289 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
This is a course designed for individual or group study through special arrangement with a faculty member. The content and methodology will be determined by the instructor. This course can be used to incorporate new material, new technologies, and new methodologies to be introduced into the curriculum. instructor’s consent required.

CSCI 310 Computing in a Global Society (Adv. Core: IS)
Computing has brought the people of the world closer together but has also divided us in significant ways. This course will examine the development of the global computing society, compare its impact and influence on developed and developing countries, and discuss the responsibilities of those who dominate it. This course will address the effects that computing has on the global society and its individuals rather than the technical content of computing. Hands-on experiences will be used to illustrate the disparity of computing resources among societies, the immediate and global impact of computing on the global society, and differences in how societies control access to computing resources.

CSCI 321 Analysis of Algorithms
This is a lecture and laboratory course that studies effectiveness, efficiency and clarity considerations in algorithm design and implementation. Both sequential and parallel algorithms are included. General techniques such as divide and conquer, greedy methods, dynamic programming, backtracking, searching and various traversals will be studied. Methodologies for analyzing algorithm efficiency are reviewed, providing the basis for studying computational complexity, and the classification of problems as being in classes P, NP and NP-complete according to their inherent difficulty. Students will distinguish tractable problems (problems with efficient solutions) from intractable problems (problems whose known solutions are impractical regardless of how powerful the computer becomes). Prerequisite: CSCI 220. Alternate years.

CSCI 322 Programming Languages
A programming language is a tool for instructing computers and computerized equipment, a means for programmers to communicate with each other, a method for expressing high-level design, a notation for algorithms, and a tool for experimentation. Students obtain an understanding of these essentials of programming languages, such as syntax, semantics, run-time structure, and data and procedural abstraction. Students study the underlying structures of programming languages along with necessary tools for critical evaluation of existing and future programming languages, concepts, and paradigms. Principles that distinguish languages and paradigms are stressed. Familiar and unfamiliar programming paradigms are covered in lectures and laboratories. Prerequisites: CSCI 220 and CSCI 225. Fall semester.

CSCI 323 Theory of Computation
This is a lecture and laboratory course that formalizes a definition of a computation model, and then uses it to study the fundamental question, “What can and cannot be computed?” Students study deterministic and non-deterministic computational models such as finite automata, push-down automata and Turing machines, as well as regular expressions and grammars. Types of problems that can and cannot be solved by each of these models of computation are identified. The Church/Turing thesis, which attempts to describe what is and is not solvable by our current model of computation, is also studied. Prerequisite: CSCI 220. Alternate years.

CSCI 330 Database Techniques and Modeling
This is a lecture and laboratory course that introduces fundamental concepts of database modeling, database design and the languages and facilities provided by database management systems. It investigates data structuring implementation techniques appropriate for databases. Entity/relationship diagrams are used for modeling. A three-layered view of database architecture is studied. The relational database model is stressed but other models are also discussed. Students work within a team environment to model and design a solution to a substantial database problem. Teams implement their solution using a robust user-interface that communicates with a database management system. Prerequisite: CSCI 205. Alternate years.

CSCI 340 Artificial Intelligence
The study of artificial intelligence involves the exploration of the principles and techniques involved in programming computers to do tasks that would require intelligence if people did them. State-space and heuristic search techniques, logic and other knowledge representations, and statistical and neural network approaches are applied to problems such as game playing, planning, the understanding of natural language and computer vision. Students will implement real-time systems that use feedback loops and the techniques mentioned above to modify the behavior of the system. Prerequisites: CSCI 220 and CSCI 225.

CSCI/BUAD 345 Business Applications Using Systems Analysis and Design
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of systems analysis and design in business applications. Students completing this course should be able to identify and analyze business problems and create solutions using systems analysis and design techniques, evaluate and choose appropriate software tools, and create design documents that can be used to implement a system. Students will also learn about user interface design, database design, systems architecture and implementation, systems operation, support, and security. A combination of lectures, assignments, group projects and case studies using systems analysis and design principles will be used. Prerequisite: BUAD 142 or computer science major. Alternate years.

CSCI 350 Event Programming Within a Windowing Environment
This is a lecture and laboratory course in event programming using a Windows-type environment. Focus is on the design and implementation of Windowing programs using an object-oriented language and other object-oriented development tools. Windowing class libraries are studied in detail and are used to implement common windowing features. Students will design and implement a substantial event-driven program using a variety of Windowing techniques and features. Prerequisite: CSCI 205. Alternate years.

CSCI 370 Introduction to Operating Systems
This is a lecture and laboratory course that investigates the algorithms, principles, design and implementation of modern operating systems. Major topics include history and evolution, tasking and processes, process coordination and synchronization, physical and virtual memory organization, I/O systems and device drivers, and security and protection. Laboratories concentrate on the practical considerations of operating systems including UNIX and Windows and case studies. Laboratory sessions focus on experiments that complement and enhance lecture topics. Closed labs will also be used to develop skills in system tools and utilities. Prerequisites: CSCI 220 and CSCI 225. Spring semester.

CSCI 373 Communications/Networks
This is a lecture and laboratory course that explores networking from the ground up. This course is built around the study of the various components of the theoretical OSI networking model from beginning to end. Moreover, students study various practical implementations of the OSI layers. Topics include data transmission, wired and wireless networking, multiplexing and switching, error detection and correction, routing and network addressing, flow and congestion control, socket programming and network security. Prerequisites: CSCI 220 and CSCI 225.

CSCI 460 Senior Capstone Experience
This is the capstone experience for the computer science major. It is designed to allow students to learn more about a particular topic in computer science, to help them further develop the skills necessary to learn on their own, to help develop presentation skills, and to help develop an awareness of the legal and ethical issues inherent in the discipline of computer science. Students will be given an individual project that integrates and extends concepts covered in other CSCI courses. The projects range from research to experimentation to design and implementation of a small system. Students present results in open forums and closed defenses. Prerequisites: senior standing and instructor’s consent. Spring semester.

CSCI 489 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
A course designed for individual or group study through special arrangement with a faculty member. The content and methodology will be determined by the instructor. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing and instructor’s consent.

CSCI 490 Independent Study
A course which allows students to pursue an area of study on an individual basis, with consultation and evaluation. The methodology and objective will be mutually agreed upon by a faculty member and the student. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and instructor consent. Independent study courses usually do not count as a computer science major requirement.

Economics

ECON 101 Principles of Macroeconomics (Core: IS)
Introduction to macroeconomic problems — unemployment and inflation. National income accounting — measures of gross domestic product. Aggregate demand and supply. Fiscal and monetary policies. Open-economy issues.

ECON 102 Principles of Microeconomics (Core: IS)
Resource allocation by consumer and producer. Derivation of demand and supply curves. Market structure — perfect competition and imperfect competition. Determination of wages and other factor prices.

ECON 251 Intermediate Macroeconomics and Contemporary Issues
Theories of national income, employment, interest rates, exchange rates and the price level, along with an in-depth analysis of the open economy. This course will explore these notions in a theoretical and applied macroeconomic context including topics such as fiscal and monetary policies, financial crises, currency crises, sovereign debt, income inequality and other contemporary issues. Prerequisite: ECON 101, ECON 102. Spring semester.

ECON 252 Intermediate Microeconomics
Consumer demand theory, utility maximization, elasticity. Theory of the firm; production and cost functions, profit maximization. Price and output decisions under perfect competition, monopoly and imperfect competition. Factor markets. General equilibrium and pareto-optimality, income distribution. Market failure. Prerequisite: ECON 102. Fall semester.

ECON 300 History of Economic Thought (Adv. Core: WT)
Study of the principal thinkers in economic philosophy. Topics include: ancient and medieval economic thought; mercantilism and the dawn of capitalism; the classical period; criticisms of classical economics; socialism; marginalism; the neoclassical period; institutionalism; John Maynard Keynes; the Austrian school; and the Chicago school. Readings from primary sources. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

ECON 325 Introduction to Econometrics
Regression analysis, ordinary least squares method of estimating parameters of linear equation involving two or more variables. Hypothesis testing. Problems of estimation. Model building and forecasting. Use of econometric software. Prerequisites: BUAD 284 or SSCI 224 or MATH 321, ECON 101 or ECON 102 or instructor’s consent.

ECON 326 Advanced Applied Econometrics
Topics in advanced econometric analysis. Incorporating lags optimally, stationarity and co-integration, simultaneous models, pooling data and systems of equations. Recommended for students interested in graduate study. Prerequisite: ECON 325. Infrequently offered. 

ECON 330 Labor Economics
Theory of labor supply and demand. Theory of human capital. Compensation issues, wages, fringe benefits, minimum wage. Unions and collective bargaining. Employment and unemployment, measurement issues, labor force participation, full employment, immigration. Income distribution, discrimination. Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102.

ECON 335 Industrial Organization
Theory of the firm, nature of different market structures, relationship between industry structure and performance, pricing strategies, vertical integration and restriction, role of information and advertising, antitrust policy and its effects. Prerequisite: ECON 102. Infrequently offered.

ECON 340 Economics of Sports 1
Economic analysis of the professional spectator sports industry. Sports fans as consumers. Teams as profit-maximizing firms. Athlete labor markets. Economics of sports and media. Sports leagues as cartels. Stadium subsidies. Sports anti-trust policy. Prerequisites: ECON 102, BUAD 284 or SSCI 224.

ECON 341 Economics of Sports 2
Survey of major issues in sports economics research literature. Considers topics in individual sports/leagues (e.g. MLB, NBA, NHL, NFL, European soccer, women’s athletics, college athletics) and topics across different sports (e.g., measuring athlete labor productivity, athlete discrimination, competitive balance, demand estimation issues). Prerequisite: ECON 340. Infrequently offered.

ECON 345 An Economic Approach to Religion
The purpose of this course is to apply principles of economics involving, for example, resource allocation and competition in an effort to increase our understanding of religious behavior. The content is driven by economic theory, but we will see it informed by the important contributions of sociology, psychology, and political science (among other disciplines). The majority of the course employs standard rational economic theory that has been prominent in the modern study of economic behavior. Some of our work will relax this assumption to reflect the contribution of behavioral economics which has recently gathered attention within the discipline. The course will employ both theoretical and empirical analyses. Consequently, the class will develop or extend economic concepts in a step-by-step fashion in order to lead students to predictions of various aspects of religious behavior enabling them to test these predictions with data. Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102. 

ECON 350 Environmental Economics
The study of the economic aspects of environmental issues such as water and air pollution, global warming and deforestation, in a microeconomic framework. Possible consequences of economic activity on the environment. Design of policies meant to foster economic development along with environmental protection. Benefit-cost analysis. Optimal use of natural resources. Prerequisite: ECON 102.

ECON 355 International Economics and Business in the UK (Adv. Core: BB)
This Global Seminar Study Abroad course seeks to explore the evolution of the European Union as well as its current and future challenges from the perspective of international economics.  Topics covered will include international finance, exchange rates, balance of payments accounting, international trade, as well as international business relations.  This course will include site visits with EU institutions and international businesses operating in the EU. Summer sessions.

ECON 357 Economics of Globalization (Adv. Core: BB)
This course is an introduction to the economics behind globalization and is designed for students with little or no previous training in economics. The course explores the historical development of international trade and finance. Examination of data will lead to the establishment of various economic theories to explain trade patterns and will cover theories ranging from those of Ricardo to those related to new trade theorists such as Paul Krugman. The course will explore many of the contentious issues related to international trade and international finance, and will consider the forces that drive increased economic integration.

ECON 375 Growth and Development
Characteristics of developing countries. Theories of economic growth: neoclassical and structuralist models, endogenous growth. Importance of physical and human capital. Export-led growth vs. import substitution. Fiscal, monetary and exchange-rate policies. Regional and global trade agreements. Country studies. Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102. Infrequently offered.

ECON 376 International Trade (Adv. Core: BB)
Comparative advantage, theories of international trade, terms of trade and welfare. Commercial policy-tariffs and quotas. Regional trading blocs, international trade agreements. Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102.

ECON 377 International Finance and Monetary Economics
Balance of payments — current account and capital account. Exchange rate determination, purchasing power parity. Open-economy macroeconomics, fiscal and monetary policies, fixed and flexible exchange rates. The role of IMF and World Bank, international debt crisis. Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102.

ECON 380 Managerial Economics
The application of microeconomic theory to managerial decision-making regarding demand, production and cost. Traditional neoclassical theory of the firm combined with modern adaptations addressing property rights, transaction costs, imperfect information and global markets. Use of linear programming techniques, emphasis on critical-thinking skills in managerial problem-solving. Prerequisite: ECON 102.

ECON 390 Money and Banking
The nature of money and the function of money in an economy. How banks and financial institutions affect the economy and the role of the Federal Reserve as a policy-making and stabilizing force. Monetary policy and its effectiveness in the context of various macroeconomic models and in the world economy. Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102.Note: Students may not get credit for both BUAD 352 and ECON 390.

ECON 391 Public Finance
Role of government — allocation, distribution, stabilization. Welfare economics, externalities, public goods. Public choice theory. Government expenditures, cost-benefit analysis. Government finance, tax vs. debt financing, deficits and the public debt. Taxation theory, income, consumption and wealth taxes. Fiscal federalism, state and local government issues. Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102.

ECON 489 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
This is a seminar course offered whenever a mutual interest in a more specialized topic in Economics exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent.

ECON 490 Independent Study (2 or 4 credits)
Individual study of an approved topic in economics under the direction of an Economics faculty member. Permits faculty and students to explore together some subject of special or personal interest. Reading and tutorial discussion are required, written work is optional. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent and approval of associate dean of social sciences.

ECON 492 Directed Research (2 or 4 credits)
Qualified students may perform economics research projects under the supervision of an Economics faculty member. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent and approval of associate dean of social sciences.

ECON 494 Internship
Appropriate work experience with business firms or government agencies may be undertaken for course credit when directly related to the educational goals of the student. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent and approval of associate dean of social sciences.

Education

EDUC 125 Foundations of U.S. Education
This course addresses the development of schools as institutions from historical, philosophical, political and sociological perspectives. It traces the evolution of schools, educational systems and educational thought in the U.S. in relation to the major traditions of education and the larger movements of American life.

EDUC 130 Psychology for Teaching (Core: IS)
Course content features learning and motivation theories and recommended teaching and assessment strategies. Concepts and required coursework are applied to primary, elementary, middle and secondary classroom situations.

EDUC 226 Social Studies Methods
Pre-service teachers will explore methods for teaching social studies in the elementary/middle school grade levels through a constructivist theoretical and philosophical lens. Pre-service teachers will also examine how social studies methods meld with theories of learning, curricular development, evaluation, and contemporary classroom practices. Particular emphasis will be placed on theory-to-practice strategies and on self and peer evaluation as part of pre-service teachers’ preparation for becoming successful and effective culturally-responsive educators. Prerequisites: EDUC 125 and EDUC 130; concurrent enrollment in pre-professional block.

EDUC 232 Adolescents with Exceptionalities
Students in this course will be introduced to the ways in which students who have low or high incidence exceptionalities can affect their learning experiences and social relationships. Through discussion of the life experiences, the professional literature and the media, students will gain awareness of how individuals with exceptionalities are able to adapt and excel. Students will become familiar with federal mandates for inclusive practices to include differentiated instruction, universal design, augmentative and alternative communication, and assistive technology as they relate to accessibility to the general curriculum and capacity based learning. In addition, students will explore models for supporting students with exceptionalities in transition to adulthood. Prerequisites: EDUC 125, EDUC 130, concurrent enrollment in pre-professional block.

EDUC 235 Teaching Methods in the Arts (2 credits)
This course explores strategies for integrating art, music and drama activities into K-8 classrooms. It offers practical experiences in the creation and teaching of arts activities while providing students with an understanding of the relationship of the arts to the core curriculum. Students will engage in learning experiences which support the use of the arts in the classroom. The goal of the course is that skills acquired in this class will lead to more creative approaches to teaching and learning.

EDUC 249 Pre-Student Teaching Experience, Elementary School (2 credits; 150 clock hours)
A practicum experience for prospective Elementary Education candidates. For five weeks, students are assigned full-time to a certified teacher as an assistant in a public or parochial school. Emphasis is placed on direct application of theory in the classroom. The focus is on determination of effective teaching / learning practice. Taken as part of the pre-professional block. Prerequisite: meet all Gate 1 requirements. Graded on S/U basis. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 223, EDUC 226, EDUC 281, EDUC 285, EDUC 286, and EDUC 362.

EDUC 250 Pre-Student Teaching Experience, Secondary School (2 credits; 150 clock hours)
A practicum experience for prospective Secondary Education candidates. For five weeks, students are assigned full time to a certified teacher as an assistant in a public or parochial school. Emphasis is placed on direct application of theory in the classroom. The focus is on discrimination of effective teaching / learning practices. Taken as part of the pre-professional block. Prerequisite: meet all Gate 1 requirements. Graded on S/U basis. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 223, EDUC 252, EDUC 254, EDUC 281, and EDUC 351.

EDUC 254 Instructional Methods for Adolescents
This course asks pre-service teachers to explore the underpinnings of diverse student populations, which compose contemporary high schools. Early Adolescent/Adolescent certification students will examine the origins of the high school, the effects of schools on minority populations, and components of culturally relevant pedagogy applicable in modern high schools. Students will be engaged in theory-to-practice coursework as part of pre-service teachers’ preparation for becoming successful and effective culturally-responsive educators. Prerequisite: EDUC 125 and EDUC 130; concurrent enrollment in pre-professional block.

EDUC 262 Children’s Literature
This course introduces pre-service teachers to the depth and breadth of children’s literature while facilitating their understanding of the role it plays in education. Focus is on analyzing literature for quality and diversity. Knowledge of genres and literary elements as they pertain to children’s literature is also emphasized. Practical applications of children’s literature for teaching academic content are essential to this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 125and EDUC 130; concurrent enrollment in pre-professional block courses.

EDUC 269 Fine Arts in the Growth and Development of Young Children
This course concentrates on two areas: arts in the curriculum and music and movement in preschool. Arts in the curriculum explores strategies for integrating art and drama activities into K-8 classrooms. It offers practical experiences in the creation and teaching of arts activities while providing students with an understanding of the relationship of the arts to the core curriculum. Students will engage in learning experiences that support the use of the arts in the classroom. Music and movement for preschoolers is designed to investigate the child’s potential for self-expression and discovery. Music and rhythms will be studied as a way to stimulate the child’s natural tendency to use movement as an instrument of play and self-expression. Students will study chants and rhythms, dance and musical games, percussion instruments, and movement and self-expression using classical and modern music. Prerequisite: meet all Gate 1 requirements.

EDUC 275 Play and Health in Early Childhood Education
This course investigates the importance of play and health in the young child’s social, cultural, psychological and physical development. Play and playful learning will be explored as a means to develop dispositional characteristics essential for growth. Pre-service teachers will learn to infuse play and playful learning into curriculum design, lesson planning and the core curriculum. Movement, games, rhythms, early fitness testing and sport skills will be discussed as a basis for self image development, nutrition awareness, cardiovascular health, and emergency first aid/safety.

EDUC 278 Positive Behavioral Support and Assessment
This course examines theories of growth, development, and learning as they relate to behavioral management, conflict resolution and positive behavior support for early learners – from birth through age eight. Preservice teachers will be able to identify and use systematic, proactive teaching strategies to support positive behavior. Emphasis will be place on designing, using and interpreting behavioral data collection systems. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of collaboration with students, colleagues, families, and community members to ensure behavioral practices and methods are culturally sensitive, developmentally appropriate and meet the direct social and academic needs of diverse early learners. Prerequisite: EDUC 125 and EDUC 130.

EDUC 281 Teaching Children with Exceptionalities
The unique needs and rights of children and adolescents eligible for special education services will be studied. Specific classifications of exceptionality include: cognitive, learning, emotional, speech / auditory, visual, physical / health, autism and gifted / talented. Conditions of prevalence, eligibility, transition, assessment, special pedagogy and multicultural considerations will be studied. Students also learn to be informed users of tests, to bring to the task certain domains of knowledge – including knowledge of the basic uses of tests, the important attributes which lead to the development of good tests, and the kinds of behaviors tested by particular tests. References to current issues, legislation and court cases will also occur. Prerequisites: EDUC 123 and EDUC 130; concurrent enrollment in pre-professional block.

EDUC / GEOL 287 Integrated STEM Methods
This course integrates research-based strategies and constructivist teaching principles with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) frameworks to provide a foundation for teaching students in PK-8 educational settings. Students will be able to create units of instruction, engage students in STEM activities, design assessment models, and understand how to design a classroom environment suitable to meet the needs of all learners. This course also will focus on environmental education including the conservation of natural resources. Prerequisites: EDUC 125 and EDUC 130; concurrent enrollment in pre-professional block.

EDUC 289 Special Topics (2 credits)
This is a seminar course offered whenever a mutual interest in a specialized topic in education or pedagogy exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students.

EDUC 290 Independent Study (2 credits)
This course provides the opportunity to investigate, through independent inquiry and critical analysis, educational theories, practices and agencies which influence the work of teachers. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and approval of associate dean of social sciences.

EDUC 292 History and Philosophy of Early Childhood Education Programs
This course is based on readings in early childhood education and related literature. It introduces students to various historical, philosophical and theoretical bases for early childhood programs. The course also introduces recent developments in the education of the young child. Special emphasis is given to the current development and administration of early childhood programs. A major feature of the course will be appropriate school site visits. Prerequisites: EDUC 125 and EDUC 130.

EDUC 310 Methods in Teaching English as a Second Language (2 credits)
This course is for prospective teachers pursuing ESL certification. It provides instruction in the following areas: methods and approaches to teaching ESL, background and techniques for teaching basic language skills, second language acquisition, learner variables, assessment, and lesson planning. Spring semester.

EDUC 315 Choral Music Methods for Junior and Senior High School (2 credits)
A study of the techniques of choral singing, performance style of various periods of music, swing choir techniques, the presentation of high school musicals, choral arranging and the administration of a choral program in the junior and senior high school. Prerequisite: MUSI 381. Fall semester.

EDUC 316 Instrumental Music in the Schools (2 credits)
All aspects of administration, budgeting, music literature and rehearsal techniques for the total instrumental music program will be explored. The unique problems of brass, percussion, string and woodwind instrumental music will be studied. The course will include observation and participation in the schools, current marching band techniques and arranging. Prerequisite: MUSI 381. Fall semester.

EDUC 317 General Music in the Elementary School (2 credits)
This course provides music education majors with the knowledge, skills, methods and materials needed for successful teaching in the elementary general music setting. Music development in children and successful methodologies for elementary music instruction are studied and applied. Piano accompanying and recorder performance skills are reinforced. Prerequisites: Music Education majors, sophomore standing. Fall semester.

EDUC 318 General Music in Secondary School (2 credits)
General music programs for adolescents are reviewed in depth. This course explores performance and non-performance opportunities. Music education majors will gain the knowledge, skills, methods, and materials needed for the successful planning and teaching in secondary general music settings. Guitar accompaniment skills are included in this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 317, music education major, sophomore standing. Spring semester.

EDUC 330 Adolescent Non-Academic Needs
This course addresses the non-academic needs and issues of the middle school student. The developmental characteristics and affective needs of middle school students are central to the educational environment that teachers must create in those classrooms to ensure student achievement. The topics in this course include classroom management and behavior management, behavior assessment, conflict resolution, and communication with families, colleagues, and community agencies. Prerequisites: EDUC 125, EDUC 130 and pre-professional block, concurrent enrollment in EDUC 332 and EDUC 334.

EDUC 332 Adolescent Psychology and Instructional Methods
This course focuses on cultivating an understanding of the holistic nature and academic needs of diverse early adolescent learner populations. Topics discussed include motivation and teaching strategies developmentally appropriate for early adolescent learners and understanding curricular issues associated with early adolescent audiences. Particular emphasis will be placed on implementing theory-to-practice strategies in the classroom and on self and peer assessment as part of pre-service teachers’ preparation in becoming successful and effective culturally-responsive educators. Prerequisites: EDUC 125, EDUC 130, and pre-professional block; concurrent enrollment in EDUC 330 and 334.

EDUC 334 Early Adolescent Field Experience (2 credits)
This field experience provides pre-service teachers the opportunity to delve further into the theory-to-practice component of pre-service training in middle school classrooms. The content of these courses will be coordinated with the material from the other Early Adolescent block courses. Students will reflect on real-world experiences when they plan, teach, and assess early adolescent students in local schools. Prerequisites: EDUC 125, EDUC 130, and pre-professional block; concurrent enrollment in EDUC 330 and 332.

EDUC 350 Developmental Reading and the Language Arts
This course is designed for early childhood / middle childhood / early adolescence certification students. Students will develop skills in working with emergent readers, study the interrelationships between reading, writing, speaking and listening and how these language arts can be infused across the curriculum. Current approaches, theories and materials used in literacy instruction are closely examined. In addition, students will acquire basic working knowledge of the speech sound system of English. Prerequisite: meet all Gate 2 requirements and satisfactory performance in pre-professional block.

EDUC 351 Reading and Language Arts Across Content Areas
This course is part of secondary sophomore block. It is the first course in a two-course sequence focusing on literacy and language arts across content areas in early adolescent and adolescent education. This course addresses six key areas: adolescent identities and literacies, effective reading and learning practices, expanding comprehension, teacher and student assessment of literacy development, learning strategies, and vocabulary knowledge. This course is based on a constructivist philosophy and includes active participation by all learners. Prerequisite: meet all Gate 1 requirements. Concurrent enrollment in pre-professional block courses.

EDUC 352 Advanced Reading in the Contact Areas (2 credits)
This is the second course in a two-course sequence focusing on literacy and language arts across content areas in early adolescent and adolescent education. The course focuses on four key areas: facilitating student motivation, applying writing-to-learn approaches, implementing information and communication technology (ICT) techniques, and employing multiple sources as teaching tools. This course builds on skills acquired in EDUC 351 and on insights on teaching and learning obtained during sophomore block field experiences. Prerequisite: satisfactory performance in pre-professional block and meet all Gate 2 requirements.

EDUC 372 A Multicultural Approach to Early Education Curricular Issues and Instructional Methods
This course explores multicultural issues in education. It is intended to help pre-service teachers gain an understanding of multicultural issues that emerge in schooling and society. This course aims to engage pre-service teachers to examine how race, ethnicity, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, language, family unit, religion, and gender influence students’ experiences in school. Pre-service teachers will be able to develop various developmentally appropriate curricula approaches in multicultural education that are culturally relevant, responsive and liberating to the diverse needs of children. Prerequisite: EDUC 125, EDUC 130, Elementary Sophomore Block.

EDUC 373 The Writing Process: Socio/Psycholinguistic Elements
This course examines the social, cognitive and linguistic perspectives of language development and how this influences the development of writing. Teachers will be able to utilize appropriate writing and assessment opportunities as it pertains to those seeking early childhood / middle childhood / early adolescence certification. This course is grounded in research in transactional theory of reading and writing. Prerequisite: satisfactory performance in pre-professional block and meet all Gate 2 requirements.

EDUC 386 Reading Improvement in the Elementary/Middle School
This course consists of class work and directed teaching experiences. Instruction is provided in diagnosis, instructional planning for remediation, ongoing evaluation of reading progress and the use of authentic literature. Students will design and implement instruction based on children’s needs. Students are supervised in a field experience as they assess, then teach children for two to three hours each week. Prerequisite: EDUC 350.

EDUC 394 Curriculum and Instructional Planning for Young Children
This course will focus on curriculum, methodology, instructional content and classroom management for pre-school and kindergarten-age children. Examples include attention to number concepts, science and investigation, early language experiences, the use of art and drama, and classroom design with special consideration of health and safety issues. Attention will be given to the implementation of developmentally appropriate practice as it relates to selecting, planning, organizing, presenting and evaluating educational experiences appropriate to the developmental level and cultural background of children. Classroom management will be put into practice during labs in the St. Norbert College Children’s Center. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of sophomore block and Gate 2 requirements.

EDUC 396 Early Childhood: Assessment of Early Learners (2 credits)
This course addresses the assessment of young children from birth through age eight. It is designed for early childhood certification students to understand the historical, theoretical, and research groundings that inform current assessment practices. Pre-service teachers will explore the role of assessment in early childhood education and examine the various forms of assessment. Pre-service teachers will examine the various methods of assessment to best meet the needs of individual students and will discuss the process of establishing an instructional plan using assessment data. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of pre-professional block.

EDUC 440 Student Teaching: Early Childhood (4 or 8 credits)
Pre-service teachers spend nine weeks of full participation at a kindergarten or in a primary grade under the direction of a cooperating teacher and college supervisor at a local public or private school. A weekly seminar is held. Prerequisite: approval to student teach. Graded on a S/U basis.

EDUC 445 Student Teaching: Middle Childhood (4 or 8 credits)
Pre-service teachers spend nine weeks of full participation in an elementary classroom under the direction of a cooperating teacher from a local public or private school and a college supervisor. During the student teaching practicum each student must participate in a seminar once a week. Prerequisite: approval to student teach. Graded on a S/U basis.

EDUC 450 Student Teaching: Early Adolescence (4 or 8 credits)
Pre-service teachers spend nine weeks of full participation in a middle school classroom under the direction of a cooperating teacher from a local public or private school and a college supervisor. During the student teaching practicum each student must participate in a seminar once a week. Prerequisite: approval to student teach. Graded on a S/U basis.

EDUC 455 Student Teaching: Adolescence (4 or 8 credits)
Pre-service teachers who seek certification to teach in a high school spend nine weeks of full participation in a local public or private high school under the direction of a cooperating teacher and a college supervisor. During the student teaching practicum each student must participate in a seminar once a week. Prerequisite: approval to student teach. Graded on a S/U basis.

EDUC 469 Student Teaching: General Music (4 or 8 credits)
Prospective general music teachers spend nine weeks of direct observation and participation in a local public or private elementary and/or middle school under the direction of a cooperating teacher and a college supervisor. Prerequisite: approval to student teach. Graded on a S/U basis.

EDUC 470 Student Teaching: Choral Music (4 or 8 credits)
Prospective choral music teachers spend nine weeks of direct observation and participation in a local public or private elementary and/or middle school under the direction of a cooperating teacher and a college supervisor. Prerequisite: approval to student teach. Graded on a S/U basis.

EDUC 475 Student Teaching: Instrumental Music 1 (2 or 4 or 8 credits)
Prospective instrumental music teachers spend nine weeks of direct observation and participation in a local public or private secondary school under the direction of a cooperating teacher and a college supervisor. Prerequisite: approval to student teach. Graded on a S/U basis.

EDUC 477 Student Teaching Abroad (0 credits)
Pre-service teachers spend half of their placement student teaching abroad. Placements have been made in England, Ireland, Wales, Scotland, Costa Rica, New Zealand, Ghana and St. Lucia. Prerequisite: approval to student teach in the United States, demonstrated evidence of dispositions, and an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher. Graded on a S/U basis.

EDUC 489 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
This is a seminar course offered whenever a mutual interest in a more specialized topic in education or pedagogy exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students.

EDUC 490 Independent Study (2 or 4 credits)
Individual study of an approved topic in education or teacher training under the direction of an education faculty member. Independent study permits faculty and students to explore together some subject of special or personal interest. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and approval of the associate dean of social sciences.

EDUC 492 Directed Research (2 or 4 credits)
Qualified students may perform projects in educational research under the supervision of an education faculty member. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and approval of the associate dean of social sciences.

EDUC 494 Internship
Appropriate work experience in schools, government agencies or firms and foundations supporting education may be undertaken for course credit when directly related to the educational goals of the student. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and approval of the associate dean of social sciences.

English

ENGL 101 English Composition (Core: WI)
This course introduces the basics of college-level writing. In it, students will learn effective strategies of argumentation, including: creating a coherent claim or thesis; analyzing and responding to others’ arguments; handling and citing evidence; and adapting written work to different audiences and subjects. Students will also learn how to make their ideas clear and coherent at the level of sentence, paragraph and document. Writing assignments may be on a variety of topics and students should expect to draft and revise their writing. Available only through the College Credit Program. ENGL 101 does not fulfill an English major requirement.

ENGL 150 Introduction to Literary Studies (Core: EI, WI)
In this course, students cultivate an appreciation for literature and develop the skills of close reading and analysis of selected works from the genres of poetry, fiction, drama and nonfiction prose according to the various principles and techniques of literary criticism.

ENGL 203 Science Fiction and Fantasy (Core: EI)
Science Fiction and Fantasy explores the importance of these two popular genres. Focal questions in the course are: what are the defining characteristics of science fiction and fantasy, and what are the larger thematic issues these genres propose. More specifically, the course looks critically at constructions of race and gender, of spirituality, of technology, of colonization and of political utopian/dystopian worlds. Authors may include George MacDonald, H.G. Wells, J.R.R. Tolkien, Ursula K. LeGuin, Peter S. Beagle, Philip K. Dick, Octavia Butler, Walter M. Miller, William Gibson, Philip Pullman, Neil Gaiman and a graphic novel.

ENGL / WMGS 206 Sexuality and Literature: Gay, Lesbian and Transgender Texts (Core: DD)
When Lord Alfred Douglas, Oscar Wilde’s partner, famously said, “I am the love that dare not speak its name,” referring to his own hidden sexual identity, he articulated a conundrum in gay identity: how do you tell your story when it is unspeakable? This introduction to the lesbian, gay and transgender tradition in literature tackles this question among others. This course focuses primarily on 20th-century U.S. texts (fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction, film and theory). Students will read such authors as E.M. Forster, Walt Whitman, Radclyffe Hall, James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Jeanette Winterson, Gloria Anzaldua, Leslie Feinberg and Tony Kushner.

ENGL 212 The Modern British Novel (Core: WT)
This course traces the development of the British novel in the 20th century by studying such writers as Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, Greene, Spark, Murdoch, Golding, Lessing and McEwan. It looks at the ways these authors have used and transformed their chosen literary genre – the novel and it also examines the modern philosophical, psychological, and sociological ideas that they have dealt with in their works.

ENGL 215 Introduction to Creative Writing (Core: EI)
Students will learn and practice the elements of craft for creative prose and poetry writing. They will read works by published poets, essayists, and fiction writers, and share their original works with classmates. They will also complete one critical essay devoted to an element of creative writing craft. Summer sessions. 

ENGL 221 The American Short Story (Core: DD, WI)
This course concentrates on the development of the American short story by studying selected works of Irving, Hawthorne, Poe, Harte, Bierce, Crane, James, Anderson, K.A. Porter, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Steinbeck, Faulkner, O’Connor, Welty, Carver and others. The course includes analysis of individual stories and some attention to literary history and theory.

ENGL 222 Modern Poetry
This course explores modern poetry by poets in the context of modernism – an international, interdisciplinary movement that spanned both world wars and included literature, music, drama, art and film. Featured poets may include progenitors Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, as well as W.B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, Claude McKay, Wilfred Owen, William Carlos Williams, Robert Frost, H.D., Gertrude Stein, Mina Loy, Marianne Moore and Langston Hughes.

ENGL 225 Survey of English Literature 1 – Beginnings to Johnson
This course provides an overview of the continuity and development of the tradition of literature of the British Isles from the Anglo-Saxon period through Samuel Johnson. Readings aim to develop understanding and appreciation of the broad sweep of English literature and include such major works as “Beowulf” and “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight” and such authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Jonson, Milton, Behn and Pope. Fall semester.

ENGL 226 Survey of English Literature 2 – Blake to the Present
This course provides an overview of the continuity and development of the tradition of literature written in the British Isles from William Blake to the present. The course includes such authors as the Romantic poets, the Victorian poets and prose writers — Yeats, Woolf, Joyce, Beckett and Heaney. In addition, it covers the various historical movements of the English tradition — neoclassical, romantic, Victorian, modern and postmodern. The course fosters an appreciation for and understanding of the broad sweep of modern English literature. Spring semester.

ENGL 228 The Continental Novel (Core: BB)
This course examines an assortment of major European novels, in excellent English translations, from the late 19th century to the present. Each novel is studied as a literary text but also as a representation of its time and place. Featured novelists include Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Kafka, Colette and others.

ENGL / AMER 235 Survey of U.S. Literature 1 – Beginnings to 1865
This course introduces students to the major writers, literary movements and cultural and historical contexts in the U.S. from its origins to the end of the Civil War. Students examine American Indian creation stories, trickster tales, encounter narratives, Puritan prose and poetry, the literature of the Enlightenment and Revolutionary War, slave narratives and the rise of romanticism. Writers include Cabeza de Vaca, Bradford, Bradstreet, Rowlandson, Edwards, Wheatley, Rowson, Irving, Equiano, Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Melville, Whitman, Harding Davis and Dickinson. Fall semester.

ENGL / AMER 236 Survey of U.S. Literature 2 – 1865 to the Present
This course introduces students to the major authors, periods and literary movements in the U.S. from the end of the Civil War to the present. Students read the works of poets, fiction writers and dramatists from the rise of realism and naturalism, through the modernist movement in the U.S., to the postmodern era. Writers include Dickinson, Clemens, Crane, Jewett, Chopin, Black Elk, Frost, Stevens, Faulkner, O’Neill, O’Connor, Updike, Erdrich, Ginsberg and Plath. Spring semester.

ENGL 240 Modern Catholic Fiction (Core: CI)
The Catholic intellectual tradition has been particularly fruitful for fostering artistic ways of imagining humans’ encounters with the divine – the Mystery undergirding all that is – because of Catholicism’s sacramental imagination, its tendency to approach the divine through human images and stories. This course will explore a variety of modern Catholic fiction writers who have done just that – they have used fiction as a way to express, probe, and critique images of the divine and experiences of faith (and of the struggle with faith). The writers who will be studied may include James Joyce, Graham Greene, Flannery O’Connor, Mary Gordon, Andre Dubus and Colm Toibin.

ENGL 289 Special Topics
This small-group seminar concentrates on a variety of literary concerns and special interests, ranging from single authors to movements, motifs or themes. Recent examples include: classical and contemporary fairytales; fiction of Joseph Conrad and Graham Greene; literary humor; creative nonfiction; and readings from hell. Course is repeatable with advisor’s and instructor’s consent.

ENGL 290 The English Language
This course helps students increase their understanding of the nature and theory of language and improve their proficiency in its use. Included are such topics as the history of the English language, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and the relationship between language and society. The course also includes the study of traditional and transformational grammar. Fall semester.

ENGL 304 Creative Nonfiction Workshop
Designed to introduce students to creative nonfiction, a genre that includes the personal essay, memoir and literary journalism. Students will read and discuss published essays, practice elements of the genre, share work with classmates and compose and revise several essays.

ENGL 305 Literary Theory and Writing
This course is designed to help students develop their critical writing skills and to prepare them for the kinds of writing they will do in upper-level literature classes, including research-based essays. The course will explore writing as a process – from generating and organizing ideas, to peer reviewing, revising, editing and publishing. Furthermore, the course will introduce students to the discourse community of English by examining various theoretical approaches to literature, including close reading, psychoanalytic, feminist and gender, Marxist, poststructuralist, multicultural, new historicist and reader-response criticism. This course introduces students to library research methods and documentation and to the creation of individual WordPress sites to house their electronic portfolios.

ENGL 306 Professional Writing
This course teaches students to write effectively in a professional context. In it, students will become acquainted with the basic genres of professional communication, such as research briefs, project/grant proposals, public outreach documents, web design, résumés, and cover letters. They will also learn a range of strategies for controlling their argumentation, organization, and prose style in a professional setting. Importantly, students will conduct this work on behalf of a local non-profit organization. In that way, they will be asked to apply the skills learned in this course for a variety of real-life readerships, each with its own strongly held values.

ENGL 307 Fiction Workshop
This course covers the fundamental principles of writing short stories: plausibility, plot construction, point of view, characterization, setting, style and the use of evocative details. The approach is workshop/tutorial. Some readings in short fiction and in theories of fiction are required.

ENGL 308 Poetry Workshop
This course focuses on the writing of poetry. The approach is workshop tutorial. Students will read and critique each other’s works; they will also read works by currently publishing poets.

ENGL 309 African-American Novel
Beginning with one of the most important texts in the African-American literary canon, Frederick Douglass’ slave narrative, the course traces the historical trajectory from antebellum autobiography to the contemporary protest novel in African-American literature. The course analyzes these texts in relation to a variety of social, political and artistic historical moments: the rise of slavery, reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, the black arts movement and the civil rights movement. Writers include Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Charles Chesnutt, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison and Toni Morrison.

ENGL / WMGS 310 Race and Sex in Contemporary U.S. Texts
This course examines race and ethnicity in American-Indian, Latino, African-American and Asian-American texts in the contemporary United States (1960s to present). The course investigates recurrent issues like immigration, memory and identity, and the legacy of slavery, as we understand the political and cultural underpinnings of the texts. Writers include Louise Erdrich, Sherman Alexie, Junot Diaz, Sandra Cisneros, Toni Morrison, Walter Mosley, Gish Jen and Don Lee. This course meets the Literature and Cultural Diversity requirement for English majors with secondary education certification. Spring semester.

ENGL / AMER / WMGS 311 Women and Literature
Through exploring literary texts by women, this course analyzes how the construction of “woman,” sex and gender has changed over time and investigates how it intersects with issues of race, class, sexuality and nation. By using feminist literary theory, the course engages the most pressing issues in the field from ideas of women’s literary voice to claims that challenge female authorship altogether. Special topics may include contemporary women writers, gender and 19th century novel, and ethnic women writers. Authors may include Virginia Woolf, Adrienne Rich, Gloria Anzaldua, Margaret Atwood, Bharati Mukherjee, Leslie Feinberg, Edwidge Danticat and Marjane Satrapi.

ENGL 312 Singles and Couples
This course looks at works of literature from various times and traditions that present two different ways of looking at the human self: in isolation (singles) and in relationship (couples). The course also addresses the larger issue of the connection (or disconnection) between literature and lived human experience. Authors studied may include Euripides, Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, Virginia Woolf and Anne Tyler.

ENGL 317 Nineteenth-Century American Novel
This course studies American novels of the 19th century that were produced during a creative and industrial heyday in American literary history. Students will explore examples from romantic, gothic, sentimental, abolitionist, naturalist, and sensational novels, focusing on such issues as canonicity, popularity, “masterpieces,” readership, and accessibility. Authors covered may include Cooper, Hawthorne, Southworth, Melville, Stowe, Fern, Davis, Twain, Wilson, Harper, and Chesnutt.

ENGL 318 The Modern American Novel
This course traces the development of the American novel from 1900 to the present. Placing examples of the genre within the changing social, artistic, political and historical patterns of the 20th-century United States, the survey includes the modernist voices of such writers as Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Steinbeck and McCullers and the contemporary and postmodern experiments of Dreiser, Wharton, Ellison, Kerouac, Vonnegut, Seattle, Morrison and DeLillo.

ENGL 321 Dante: The Divine Comedy (Adv. Core: WT)
This course studies Dante Alighieri’s “Divine Comedy” as a mutual endeavor on the part of students and instructor to appreciate and comprehend that great medieval vision of human nature, purpose and values, and to confront the questions about values that Dante poses for contemporary human beings. In this process readers journey through hell, purgatory and heaven, eventually returning to live in the here and now with a fuller understanding of who they are.

ENGL 322 Medieval Literature
This course follows the development of Western thought as exhibited in literature from the late classical to the Renaissance (modern) world, using such texts as “On Christian Doctrine,” “The Consolation of Philosophy,” “Beowulf,” “The Song of Roland,” “The Quest of the Holy Grail,” “The Cloud of Unknowing,” and “Le Morte D’Arthur.” The course shows how aspects of medieval religion, philosophy and aesthetics linger and influence the ways we think, read and write today. It addresses concerns and themes that pervade works of the early and late medieval periods (quest, apocalypticism, the value of this world, mystical experience) and uncovers links that define the Middle Ages as a period historically, culturally and artistically.

ENGL / AMER 323 The Harlem Renaissance
This course examines the flowering of culture — in the areas of literature, music, dance and art — which took place predominantly during the 1920s for black Americans in Harlem, New York, a movement that has become known as the Harlem Renaissance. The course places this cultural renaissance, or rebirth, within the historical context out of which it grew — the modernizing America in a post-WWI era, the rise of jazz and the blues, and the Great Migration, among other factors. Some of the writers, intellectuals, visual and performing artists studied may include Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, James Weldon Johnson, Nella Larsen, Claude McKay, Alain Locke, Helene Johnson, Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, Bessie Smith, Ma Rainey and Duke Ellington.

ENGL 325 Chaucer
This course discusses Chaucer’s early poetry, “Troilus and Criseyde,” and “Canterbury Tales” from linguistic, historical and especially artistic points of view. Spring semester, alternate years.

ENGL 326 Shadows and Illuminations
This course examines the spiritual quest for meaning or transcendence, which can be thought of metaphorically as either a journey down or a journey up. Seen as a journey down, this is a descent into depth, into what Joseph Conrad called “the heart of darkness;” this is a realm of shadow and often uncanny fear and uncomfortable journey and yet it is often a necessary – perhaps even beautiful and life-expanding – part of the search for meaning. The journey up is the ascent to enlightenment or illumination, described by many different religious traditions and portrayed by literary artists as diverse as Shakespeare, Hawthorne and Morrison. The course will use works from various periods, traditions and genres to examine these two aspects of the spiritual journey and to reflect on the way literary texts can present, enhance and perhaps even embody such a journey.

ENGL / AMER 329 Literature of Service
This course addresses concepts of American culture through the dual lenses of literary texts and community-based learning. The course explores individuals and communities in crisis or transition as a result of poor health, poverty, immigration, homelessness and gendered, sexual, racial or ethnic discrimination. Throughout the semester, paired students regularly volunteer at local community service agencies and expand their knowledge of these concepts by writing reflection journals as well as various forms of researched persuasive critical writing (literary analysis, opinion editorials, grant proposals and newsletters). Authors may include Dorothy Day, Robert Coles, Jane Addams, William Carlos Williams, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Fae Myenne Ng or Li-Young Lee.

ENGL 334 Milton
This course begins with a study of Milton’s early poetry and prose and moves to a concentration on his greatest works — “Paradise Lost,” “Paradise Regained” and “Samson Agonistes.” Spring semester, alternate years.

ENGL 339 Shakespeare’s Drama
This course surveys Shakespeare’s drama and usually includes representative plays from the following categories: history, comedy, tragedy and romance. In essence, it includes a dramatic sampler of Shakespeare’s finest works. Fall semester.

ENGL 356 Postcolonial Literature (Adv. Core: BB)
This course covers 20th and 21st century literature composed by writers grappling with colonialism or its enduring legacy. Students will read and respond to a variety of postcolonial literature and cultures, which may include poetry, short fiction, novels, film, and postcolonial theory. The course will usually cover literature written in English from India, Pakistan, Africa, and the Caribbean, but may also explore literature from other countries or continents with a history of colonialism.

ENGL  358 Nineteenth-Century English Novel
This course studies representative novels and emphasizes the movement from romanticism to Victorian social criticism and on to the beginning of modernism. It may include works by Austen, Dickens, Thackeray, the Brontës, Trollope, Meredith, Collins, Braddon, Stevenson, Eliot and Hardy.

ENGL 385 Heroes and Sages (Adv. Core: WT)
Participants will consider how concepts of heroism and wisdom pervade human cultures and how they evolve. The syllabus will include readings about famous heroes and sages from several cultures from both the ancient and modern worlds. Books may include “The Odyssey,” “The Bhagavad-Gita,” “The Shah-Nameh,” “Beowulf,” “Aurora Leigh,” “Jane Eyre,” “The Tao Te Ching,” “Zen Flesh,” “Zen Bones,” and “The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam,” among many others, and we will also view and discuss selected films. Our interdisciplinary approach will include both Western and non-Western classics as we consider how through our history we have struggled to evaluate what we consider brave and wise.

ENGL 425 Advanced Seminar in Creative Writing and Contemporary Literature
Students critique each other’s fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction and study the works of contemporary writers and poets. The class includes individual tutorial sessions. Students are expected to complete a course portfolio of selected original works. Prerequisites: ENGL 307, ENGL 304 or ENGL 308.

ENGL 489 Advanced Seminar in English Literary Studies
This seminar offers junior and senior English majors (and minors with instructor’s consent) the opportunity to concentrate on a special problem or theme or on an author or combination of authors. Recent examples include: James Joyce’s “Ulysses”, T. S. Eliot, Authoring Arthur, Henry James, Charles Dickens, Gender and Sexuality in 19th Century U.S. Literature, Zora Neale Hurston and Toni Morrison. The course is repeatable with advisor’s and instructor’s consent.

ENGL 490 Independent Study (2 or 4 credits)
This course allows staff and students to explore together topics of special interest.

ENGL 491 Advanced Tutorial in Creative Writing
Students work with the instructor and three to five other students on the writing of poetry, fiction or creative nonfiction. Some readings of contemporary writers will be assigned. Students are expected to write and revise a substantial creative project of their own design. Prerequisite: ENGL 307 or ENGL 308. Course is repeatable with advisor and instructor’s consent.

ENGL 494 Internship
An internship experience allows students to apply their studies in a supervised work situation. Students benefit from an inside look at different kinds of organizations by having a chance to work in their field of study and by gaining experience with state-of-the-art equipment and practices. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and instructor’s consent.

ENGL 499 English Portfolio (0 credits)
All English majors are required to collect and submit a senior English portfolio (one essay or writing assignment from each ENGL course taken, plus a self-evaluative introductory essay) in order to fulfill the ENGL 499 graduation requirement. During their four years of coursework, English majors should electronically store their essays and writing assignments, and the final portfolio will be built from this stored written work. Senior English majors enroll in ENGL 499 during their final semester, and completed portfolios are due at the conclusion of the semester. Prerequisite: senior standing.

English as a Second Language [ESLI]

ESLI 042 Beginning Reading (0 credits)
Students increase their vocabulary, read faster, and understand more of what they read. They develop reading strategies such as skimming, scanning, guessing meaning from context, previewing and predicting. Students practice reading authentic material such as short reading passages, simplified short stories and news articles, and an abridged ESL novel.

ESLI 043  Beginning Writing (0 credits)
Students improve their ability to write in English by learning to write simple and compound sentences in English and short, well-organized simple paragraphs which include title, topic sentence, supporting sentences, and a conclusion. Students practice rules of punctuation and capitalization, as well as learn spelling rules. In addition to learning basic writing skills, students study simple verb tenses, nouns, pronouns, adverbs and adjectives.

ESLI 044  Beginning Speaking (0 credits)
Students learn to communicate in English in everyday situations. They learn to ask and answer questions, use the telephone, take messages, pronounce and note simple numbers, and perform functions such as initiating conversations, asking for directions, making invitations, closing conversations, etc. Class activities include performing simple role plays, participating in small groups, and presenting three-minute visual presentations. Students engage in authentic dialogue.

ESLI 045  Beginning Listening (0 credits)
Students practice listening to authentic taped conversations and monologues on topics of general and cultural interest. The focus in this class is on listening to discourse that is no more than five minutes in length. Students work on understanding phrases, simple sentences and questions, as well as perceiving stress and basic intonation patterns.

ESLI 052  Elementary Reading (0 credits)
This reading skills course develops skills in reading speed and comprehension. Students are introduced to reading strategies such as skimming, scanning, guessing meaning from context, previewing, predicting, making inferences and giving opinions. Reading materials include short stories, news articles, computer passages and a simplified novel.

ESLI 053  Elementary Writing (0 credits)
In this course students learn to write well-organized and coherent paragraphs that include a topic sentence and detailed supporting sentences. Students practice a variety of writing styles and forms, which may include narrative, descriptive and expository paragraphs, journals, and letters. By the end of the term, students understand and write a three-paragraph essay. Grammar study includes review and practice of the simple and present perfect tenses, study and practice of noun forms, adjectives, modals, gerunds and infinitives.

ESLI 054  Elementary Speaking (0 credits)
In this course students actively practice speaking skills for a variety of situations including requesting and giving information, and practice strategies for beginning, maintaining and ending a conversation. Special attention is given to pronunciation, intonation and correct grammar usage. Activities may include making introductions, giving demonstrations and short speeches, role playing, and group discussions. Active participation in daily classroom activities is required.

ESLI 055 Elementary Listening (0 credits)
In this course students learn to listen for details and inferences as well as main ideas. Students summarize passages heard on tape or video. Students learn to discriminate between different stress and intonation patterns, recognize and identify verb tenses, possession markers and plurality.

ESLI 065  American Society (0 credits)
In this content-based listening/speaking course, students are introduced to American culture and values. Class themes include education in America, ethnic and racial assimilation, women and work, American government, religion, and entertainment. Activities may include reading, discussing and analysis of video/movie segments. Classes are frequently supplemented with class trips in the community. Students develop confidence in their ability to use American English as they gain a better understanding of American society.

ESLI 066  Culturally Speaking (0 credits)
This speaking course introduces students to American culture through classroom discussions and role-playing. The class focuses on improving aural/oral skills while giving students the opportunity to communicate in authentic language situations. Students improve listening and speaking skills by comparing and contrasting cultures, including their own.

ESLI 067  Public Speaking (0 credits)
This course develops the oral communication skills of intermediate and advanced-level ESL students. Emphasis is given to speaking in academic, business and professional situations. Reading and writing are also required components of the class. Students develop analytical skills by identifying issues, evaluating options and solving problems. A wide variety of materials and methods may be used to achieve course goals.

ESLI 072  Intermediate Reading (0 credits)
This intermediate-level reading class emphasizes reading strategies such as skimming for ideas, scanning for specific information, separating fact from opinion, guessing meaning from context, making inferences and understanding humor. Students improve reading speed and comprehension using such materials as short stories, news articles, and abridged and unabridged novels. An important part of the course is the transition from ESL reading material to authentic first-language texts.

ESLI 073  Intermediate Writing (0 credits)
This course teaches students to develop a written paper into a unified, coherent, well-supported five-paragraph college-style essay that incorporates clearly written sentences in a variety of styles and mature (complex) sentences. Writing tasks include in-class timed essays, out-of-class process essays with two to three drafts each, summaries of newspaper and magazine articles, and reactions to readings with opinions and personal reflections.

ESLI 074  Intermediate Speaking (0 credits)
Students develop oral communication skills. Emphasis is given to speaking in academic, business and professional situations. Reading and writing are also required components of the class. Students develop analytical skills by identifying issues, evaluating options and solving problems. A wide variety of materials and methods may be used to achieve course goals.

ESLI 075  Intermediate Listening (0 credits)
This course introduces students to pre-college academic lectures and note taking as well as to different aspects of American humor through the use of taped lectures and radio broadcasts. Students develop skills to understand main ideas and significant details, inferences and cultural aspects of American humor.

ESLI 081  Current Events / News (0 credits)
In this course students continue to improve listening comprehension and speaking skills. Students participate in discussions of current social and political issues. Students gather and organize information from sources that include television news, newspapers, magazines, personal interviews and electronic media. Students engage in a variety of activities including out-of-class research, in-class listening exercises, small and large group discussions of news reports, and oral and written presentations.

ESLI 085  Business Issues (0 credits)
This is a multi-skill course that introduces students to current business issues in American economic life. Students read, write and discuss business issues in the context of American cultural values. Students read, write, listen and discuss issues from television news reports, the Wall Street Journal and other daily or weekly business publications. Grammar is reviewed and assigned for homework as needed. 

ESLI 086  Introduction to U.S. Political History (0 credits)
Students learn about the impact of the Revolutionary War and Civil War on American society. Students will discuss the factors that led to war, the politics involved before and during the war, and the major battles fought in each war. Course materials include videos, Internet research, readings and speeches. Major assignments for this course will include presentations, tests and quizzes, written assignments, and a research paper. 

ESLI 088 Introduction to American Literature (0 credits)
This content-based course gives students an overview of various genres in American literature to introduce the most distinguished American authors and their works. The course focuses on aspects of American life and its reflection through literature. 

ESLI 089 Introduction to Intercultural Communication (0 credits)
Students listen to, write about, and discuss the meaning of culture and how it influences communication with people from other cultures. Students identify culturally determined values and beliefs about their own culture and identify reasons for the success or failure of intercultural communication. The course combines readings and lectures with problem-solving activities using role plays, discussions, simulations, reflection papers and group discussions. 

ESLI 091  Advanced Lecture and Note Taking (0 credits)
In this class students practice listening to extended speech and lectures, identify key ideas, supporting details and organizational patterns. Content includes guest lectures and recorded lectures. Students are required to observe and report on several college lecture classes. Students learn to take comprehensible notes using note-taking symbols and abbreviations.

ESLI 092  Advanced Reading (0 credits)
In this class students are exposed to the kinds of reading that they can expect to find in their college courses. Course materials include college textbook material, newspaper and journal articles, essays, a full-length unabridged novel, short stories and poetry. Students continue to practice inferencing, skimming, scanning, and summarizing. Students respond to readings through writing, discussions and oral reports.

ESLI 093  Advanced Writing (0 credits)
This pre-college writing course requires students to use all writing skills to write timed and drafted essays, complete essay exam questions and complete a 6-10 page research paper. Skills taught include brainstorming, outlining, researching, drafting and redrafting, preparing and using notes, source and bibliography cards. Students research, analyze and evaluate issues. In addition, students summarize, paraphrase, quote and document sources.

ESLI 096  Issues for Debate and Discussion (0 credits)
This listening/speaking course is for high intermediate and advanced-level students. Students continue to build confidence in speaking by participating in class discussions and debates and by making individual oral presentations. Students learn conversational strategies such as agreeing and disagreeing, interrupting and asking for clarification. Students listen to both formal and informal English. Topics of discussion typically include current events and controversial issues.

Environmental Science

ENVS 300 Environmental Science (Adv. Core: PN)
Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary field of study which relies on the principles of biology, chemistry and geology as well as the social sciences to explain complex natural systems. ENVS 300 is a survey course in this field and discusses how natural systems function with an emphasis on how these systems have been affected by human activity. Recent advances in scientific research indicate that in addition to the well-known local and regional effects of human activity on the environment, humans are changing the world we live in on a global scale. The possible ramifications of the environmental issues discussed in this course make the material both relevant and controversial. An attempt is made to present information in an objective, scientific manner, allowing students to reach their own conclusions regarding the proper response to environmental threats and to develop a personal environmental ethic. Note: environmental science majors may not take ENVS 300 to fulfill a requirement in the Core Curriculum. Students may not take both ENVS 300 and SSCI 301 for credit.

ENVS 428 Environmental Science Research
In consultation with the instructor, students design and execute a research project or study in the area of environmental science or environmental chemistry. This course is generally taken by environmental science majors in their senior year.

French
Students majoring in French and Francophone Studies are required to take four core courses (FREN 305, 360, 375, and 400) at St. Norbert College. Students then choose to focus on one of two tracks: the Literature, Society and Culture track requires FREN 320, while the French for the Professions track requires FREN 325. Students will also take three electives abroad which focus on their chosen track. These courses will be approved by French faculty. 

FREN 101 Elementary French 1
An intensive introduction to practical French with an emphasis placed on the four language skills: understanding, speaking, reading and writing.

FREN 102 Elementary French 2 (Core: SL)
Continuation of FREN 101.

FREN 203 Intermediate French 1: French Language and Society Through Film (Core: SL)
FREN 203 is the first part of a two-semester sequence (203-204) leading to a transcriptable certificate in French. It focuses on the development of communication and cultural competency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Class discussions will focus on culturally significant films and student presentations will include topics such as art, music and cinema.  FREN 203 will take students to a new level of proficiency and provide them with the self-confidence necessary to study and live in a Francophone country. Prerequisite: FREN 102.

FREN 204 Intermediate French 2: Communication in French and Francophone Contexts (Core: SL)
Students completing FREN 204 with a B average or better in all previous French classes at the college will quality for the certificate in French. Through the study of film, music and other media from the French and Francophone worlds, students will continue to improve their proficiency in reading, writing and speaking.  This course is especially designed to develop students’ communication skills in order to discuss contemporary topics of cultural and literary significance.  It prepares students for advanced courses in French. Prerequisite: FREN 203. Spring semester.

FREN 305 Introduction to French Literature and Society (Adv. Core: EI, WI)
This course is an introduction to French Literature and is designed for students who seek to improve their French as well as learn about French literature and culture.  FREN 305 examines a wide variety of literary texts, drawing on poetry, prose, and drama, from the Middle Ages through the contemporary period in order to highlight significant achievements in the French experience. Prerequisite: FREN 204 or instructor’s consent. Fall semester.

FREN 320 Masterpieces of French Literature (Adv. Core: WT)
An overview of representative masterpieces of French literature from the 17th to the 20th centuries. Topics covered include the classical period, ideas of the Enlightenment, the development of the 19th-century novel and existentialism. The course will also include film excerpts as visual texts. Prerequisite: FREN 204. Spring semester.

FREN 325 French for the Professions
This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to professional communication in French, as a language for use in business, government and the non-governmental sector. Special focus will be given to basic professional vocabularies, oral, written and non-verbal communication, and French-American cross-cultural interaction. Prerequisite: FREN 305 or instructor’s consent. Every other fall semester.

FREN 360 Contemporary Francophone Societies Through Literature and Film
This course provides an analysis of the relations between France and its former colonies as manifested in the literature and film of France and the Francophone world. Questions of race and gender relations, exile, nationalism, identity and place are explored in written and visual texts. Prerequisite: FREN 305 or instructor’s consent. Every other fall semester.

FREN 375 French Civilization and Identity (Adv. Core: BB)
This course examines the representation of French identity from is origins in Roman times to its present forms. An interdisciplinary approach through the study of art, cinema and documentaries will enhance student understanding of the French intellectual tradition. Other topics will be drawn from history, human geography, the fine arts, philosophy and cultural iconography. Prerequisite: FREN 305 or instructor’s consent. Spring semester.

FREN 389 Special Topics
Topics of special interest, dealing with Francophone literature, civilization or culture. Course may be taken more than once for credit if topic is different. Prerequisite: FREN 305 or instructor’s consent. Generally taken abroad as FREN 393.

FREN 390 Advanced Conversation and Composition
Emphasis on developing facility in oral expression based on Francophone literatures and cultures. Attention to phonetics, pronunciation and syntax. Development of more difficult and sophisticated patterns of expression. Prerequisite: FREN 305 or instructor’s consent. Generally taken abroad.

FREN 400 Senior Capstone Seminar: Contemporary French Society
A study of French society as it has been shaped by the major historical and cultural events since WWII (globalization, immigration, European construction, etc.), drawing on a wide variety of textual and audio-visual media and inspired by current events such as the tragic events in Paris in January 2015. Prerequisite: FREN 375. Spring semester.

FREN 490 Independent Study (2 or 4 credits)
For upper-level students in lieu of a regular course; plan of work must be approved before registering. Reports, papers and examination required.  Prerequisite: Two courses above FREN 204 or instructor’s consent.

Geography

GEOG 120 Global Physical Environments (Core: PN)
This course addresses the spatial dimensions of our planet, including energy transfer, air, water, weather and climate, landforms, vegetation and soils. Understanding of the interrelationships between these systems – and of human interaction with them – is key to forming an integrated understanding of the physical landscape and its significance to humankind. The course addresses issues of the environment and of natural hazards and includes a substantial laboratory component. Infrequently offered.

GEOG 140 World Regions and Issues (Core: BB)
This course introduces geographic themes and critical issues of relevance in our global society and will enhance awareness and appreciation of other peoples and places. Through this regional survey of lands and life, students gain a grasp of differences and commonalities among the world’s physical and human landscapes and how they impact life in these regions — as well as connections to our own lives. Regional profiles include the analysis of varied issues of the physical environment, population distributions, cultural landscapes, and select historical, political and economic issues primarily via the spatial point of view. This regional approach consistently emphasizes map work.

GEOG 155 Ethnic Geographies of the U.S. (Core: DD)
This course provides an overview of the geographic diversity of population in the United States. Ethnic groups such as Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanics, and Asians will be included in our discussion of the ethnic complexity of the United States. Case studies of ethnic groups from various places and regions, including Wisconsin, will be examined via text and outside readings, online sources, and film. NOTE: This course is offered in a hybrid format: eight face-to-face class meetings and the balance online.

GEOG 225 Social Geography (Core: DD)
This course provides an introductory survey of geographic themes and concepts of social and cultural relevance in our fast-changing world, with a particular emphasis on the United States. The course offers an opportunity to raise understanding of and appreciation for geographic realities in the lives of others — as well as in our own daily existence. Topics include population dynamics, migration, ethnicity, gender, language, religion, urbanization and the political landscape. Geographic/spatial aspects of these issues are examined on a variety of scales in diverse locales. Map work is emphasized.

GEOG 238 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
This lecture/lab course introduces the basic theory, tools and skills of Geographic Information Systems (G.I.S.) in a hands-on computer lab setting. G.I.S. integrates hardware, software and data to capture, manage, analyze and display all forms of spatially referenced information. G.I.S. has revolutionized the ways in which we can question, interpret, and visualize data across a wide range of disciplines. Students will be introduced to the spatial thinking upon which G.I.S. is built and how to apply this knowledge to real-world, interdisciplinary scenarios. The course will build students’ ability to understand, visualize, analyze and solve geographic problems.

GEOG 363 Global Urbanizations (Adv. Core: BB)
This course focuses on the development of the present global urban system primarily, but not exclusively, from a geographic perspective. Topics include the origins and evolution of cities in both the developed and developing world (with special attention to U.S. urban growth); aspects and models of the internal structure of cities; and the recent growth of the “world cities” (those power centers that dominate the global economy), and of the developing world’s fast-growing megacities. Both the enduring promise and persistent problems of urbanization are addressed. The functions and meanings of cities and urban change will be explored from various cultural perspectives.

GEOG 489 Special Topics
Examination of selected topics of interest to faculty and students, such as demographics, political geography, maps and map making, advanced Geographic Information Systems, cultural landscapes, in-depth regional analysis, or other topics.

Geology

GEOL 105 Geology (Core: PN)
A study of geological phenomena involved in the formation of the Earth’s surface and subsurface features, the interrelationship between humans and the geological environment, and the application of the science of geology to problems resulting from the increasingly intense use of the materials of the Earth’s crust. The course includes lectures, discussions, labs and field trips.

GEOL 107 Environmental Geology (Core: PN)
This course provides an introduction to geologic processes with a special emphasis on the interaction of these processes with humankind. Topics include geologic hazards (e.g. earthquakes, volcanoes, flooding), geologic resources and human impact on the natural environment such as groundwater contamination and mining. Includes lectures, discussion, labs and field trips.

GEOL 109 Dinosaurs and Their Environment (Core: PN)
This course explores the origin, evolution, and extinction of dinosaurs as well as the environment at the time the dinosaurs were alive. Dinosaurs are also used to learn about how science is used to evaluate the Earth, both past and present. Fundamental geological principles that affected the distribution and life history of dinosaurs are also covered. Includes lectures and labs.

GEOL 115 General Oceanography (Core: PN)
This course provides an overview of the ocean sciences, with emphasis on the interplay between its geological, physical, chemical and biological processes. The impact of oceans on Earth’s climate will be examined, as well as possible human impact on climate and global sea level changes. Other human concerns, including marine pollution problems and species extinction, will be addressed.

GEOL 225 Hydrogeology
This course provides an overview of the hydrologic cycle with emphasis placed on the study of groundwater. Discussions include the fundamental characteristics of aquifers (porosity and permeability), the geologic settings of groundwater and the basic physics of groundwater flow. This course also provides an introduction to surface water in streams and its geomorphic effects. The course includes lectures, discussion, laboratory and field exercises. A basic knowledge of high school algebra and trigonometry is assumed. Prerequisite: GEOL 105. Offered every other year.

GEOL 230 GIS for Geosciences
An introduction to Geographic Information Systems with emphasis in earth science applications such as mapping and terrain analysis.  This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts, uses, and applications of Geographic Information System software.  Exercises include working with a variety of data sets applicable to answering questions in earth and environmental science. Spring semester. 

GEOL 250 Geomorphology
This course provides an overview of the geologic processes responsible for shaping and modifying the Earth’s surface. Emphasis is placed on the study of the following topics: physical and chemical weathering, soils, mass wasting, streams, glaciers, wind and desert processes, karst features, coastal processes, tectonic geomorphology, and landscape evolution. Includes lectures, discussions, labs and field trips. Prerequisite: GEOL 105. Offered every other year.

GEOL 275 Historical Geology
This course focuses on the major events in Earth’s history. In particular, the history of life through time, changes in sea level and climate, and the evolution of Earth’s lithosphere are studied, with a focus on the North American continent. Interpretation of the rock and fossil records will be a key component. Includes lectures, discussions and labs. Prerequisite: GEOL 105. Offered every other year.

GEOL 280 Introduction to Paleontology
This course focuses on the fossil record from a geological perspective. A major component of the course will involve learning how to use the distribution of fossils to correlate rock units. Other topics will include identification of major fossil groups, the preservation of fossils, and the relationship between fossil organisms and their environments. Prerequisite: GEOL 105. Recommended: GEOL 275.

GEOL / EDUC 287 Integrated Science Methods and Introductory Geology 1
This is the first half of a yearlong sequence that integrates the teaching of science methods for elementary pre-service teachers with a science course. Students will learn the basic concepts and skills of geology in conjunction with how to teach those concepts and skills to elementary students. The content of part one and part two of the course will be similar to combined content of EDUC 285 and GEOL 105 Introductory Geology. To fulfill the requirement of science methods in the education program, students must complete part one and part two of the yearlong sequence.

EDUC / GEOL 287 Integrated STEM Methods
This course integrates research-based strategies and constructivist teaching principles with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) frameworks to provide a foundation for teaching students in PK-8 educational settings. Students will be able to create units of instruction, engage students in STEM activities, design assessment models, and understand how to design a classroom environment suitable to meet the needs of all learners. This course also will focus on environmental education including the conservation of natural resources. Prerequisites: EDUC 125 and EDUC 130; concurrent enrollment in pre-professional block.

GEOL 300 Mineralogy
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of mineral formation and identification. The lecture portion of the course conveys the principles and concepts of mineralogy. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on the descriptive aspects of the science emphasizing the occurrence of the common minerals and developing the ability to identify hand samples. Topics also included are crystallography, crystal chemistry and microscopic identification of minerals. Prerequisite: GEOL 105.

GEOL 320 Petrology
This course provides an overview of the formation, occurrence, and recognition of the igneous and metamorphic rocks. The lecture portion of the course will cover the theoretical aspects of rock development with particular emphasis on the tectonic framework. The laboratory portion will emphasize macroscopic and microscopic identification of the various rock types and their associated textures. Prerequisite: GEOL 300.

GEOL 322 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy
A lecture and laboratory course that examines the origin and characteristics of sediments and sedimentary rocks, transportation mechanisms, and geologic environments in which sediments are deposited, unification and diagenesis, classification schemes for sedimentary rock nomenclature, and the arrangement and correlation of sedimentary rocks. Prerequisites: GEOL 105 and GEOL 300. Offered every other year.

GEOL 325 Structural Geology
This course explores the processes of deformation of the Earth’s crust and how this deformation is recorded by rocks. Emphasis is placed on the correct observation and interpretation of features such as faults, folds and shear zones. Includes lectures, discussions, labs and field trips. Prerequisites: GEOL 300 and GEOL 320.

GEOL 350 Glacial and Quaternary Geology
An introduction to glacial process and environments. Emphasis is placed on the origin of landforms and landscapes produced by glaciations. Related topics covered in this course include Quaternary climate change, eolian (wind) processes, river and lake systems, and periglacial processes. Includes lectures, discussion, laboratory and field trips. Prerequisite: GEOL 105. Infrequently offered.

GEOL 354 Field Geology (2 or 4 credits)
This course provides an extended field experience for geology majors. Usually includes two to three weeks of travel and study of the geology and natural history of Costa Rica. The course focuses on plate tectonic processes, active volcanism and arid sedimentary environments in a modern geologically active region. Special emphasis is placed on careful observation, description and interpretation of geologic phenomena. Prerequisites: GEOL 105 and instructor’s consent. Infrequently offered.

GEOL 389 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
A course designed for group study of a subject matter of special interest. Typically applied to an extended field trip offered during winter break or spring break with associated lectures, labs, research and/or literature review. Special topics courses that include a field trip require an additional fee to cover expenses, such as travel. Prerequisites: GEOL 105 and instructor’s consent.

GEOL 428 Environmental Geology Research
Original field or laboratory study and research in the area of environmental geology. Course requirements vary depending on the research focus and must be agreed upon by the student and supervising instructor. This course is designed to satisfy the senior thesis requirement of the environmental science major. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent.

GEOL 450 Geology Field Camp (6 credits)
A summer field course that integrates basic geologic skills and knowledge in the construction of geologic maps. The field camp is typically six to eight weeks in duration, and students normally attend the course during the summer between their junior and senior years. This course is not offered by St. Norbert College. Students must enroll in a field camp offered by another institution. Prerequisites: geology major and approval of field course by the geology discipline.

GEOL 490 Independent Study
A course that allows students to pursue an area of study on an individual basis with consultation and evaluation by a Geology faculty member. Course methodology and objectives will be mutually agreed upon by the faculty member and the student. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent.

GEOL 492 Directed Research
An arranged course involving substantial laboratory and/or field research in an area of interest to the student and under the supervision of one or more geology faculty members. This course may be based on a group project. Students who wish to use a summer research experience performed at another institution for GEOL 492 credit must have the discipline’s approval prior to undertaking the research. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent or discipline approval.

GEOL 496 Senior Thesis
Original field or laboratory research in geology under the supervision of a faculty member in the discipline. The student is required to write a thesis summarizing the objectives, methods, data and significant results of the research. In addition, presentation of research results at a professional meeting is encouraged. Prerequisites: geology major and instructor’s consent.

German

GERM 101 Elementary German 1
An intensive introduction to practical German with an emphasis placed on the four language skills: understanding, speaking, reading and writing. Required laboratory practice. Fall semester.

GERM 102 Elementary German 2  (Core: SL)
Continuation of GERM 101. Prerequisite: GERM 101. Spring semester.

GERM 203 Intermediate German 1 (Core: SL)
Study of intermediate language through grammar, vocabulary, conversation, readings, composition and culture. Required laboratory practice. Prerequisite: GERM 102.

GERM 204 Intermediate German 2 (Core: SL)
A continuation of GERM 203 with emphasis on developing facility in oral and written expression as well as reading short literary texts. Prerequisite: GERM 203.

GERM 304 German Composition (Adv. Core: EI, WI)
GERM 304 or GERM 305 is required of all majors and minors. The course includes a review of German grammatical structures, syntax and idioms through weekly compositions and short literary readings. Emphasis is on developing facility in diverse types of written expression. This course is comprised of composition on literary topics to prepare students for upper-level courses in German. Prerequisite: GERM 204. Fall or spring semester, as needed.

GERM 305 Introduction to German Literature and Literary Criticism (Adv. Core: EI)
German 304 or 305 is required of all majors. An introduction to major trends in German literature, including critical terminology and concepts, through class discussion of various literary genres: fables, fairytales, short stories, poems and drama. Prerequisite: GERM 204. Fall or spring semester, as needed.

GERM 328 Enlightenment and Classicism
A study of the changes and literary production of the German Enlightenment and Weimar classicism as seen in the works of authors such as Gottsched, Lessing, Herder, Goethe and Schiller. Emphasis will be placed on drama. Prerequisite: GERM 304 or GERM 305. Infrequently offered.

GERM 349 Realism and Naturalism
A study of the 19th century German literary movements Realism and Naturalism with emphasis on prose and drama, exploring such authors as Stifter, Keller, Raabe, Storm, Fontane, Holz and Hauptmann. Prerequisite: GERM 304 or GERM 305. Infrequently offered.

GERM 350 Modern German Literature
A study of recent developments in German literature, including East German literature. Literary movements include Impressionism, Expressionism, Epic Theatre, Kahlschlagliteratur, Group ‘47 and Neo- Subjectivism. Prerequisite: GERM 304 or GERM 305. Infrequently offered.

GERM 355 Romanticism
A study of the Romantic Movement in Germany with emphasis on fairy tales, short stories, novellas and poetry. Students will analyze the works of such authors as Hölderlin, Novalis, Tieck, Fouqué, Hoffmann, Brentano, Eichendorff and the Brothers Grimm. Prerequisite: GERM 304 or GERM 305. Infrequently offered.

GERM 360 German Poetry
A study of German lyric poetry from Goethe to the present. Prerequisite: GERM 304 or GERM 305. Infrequently offered.

GERM 375 German Civilization 1 (Adv. Core: WT)
This class is meant as the first non-grammar course. Through extensive German language readings, this course acquaints students with the early cultures of German-speaking nations, German history, society and political institutions. Literature and art from 800 to 1600 are explored in depth. Prerequisite: GERM 204. Fall semester.

GERM 376 German Civilization 2 (Adv. Core: BB)
Continuation of German 375. A study of German-speaking countries from 1815 to the present. The course will explore the cultural, sociological and political developments of the era, with special emphasis on the art of the Weimar Period (Expressionism, Dada, Bauhaus, Early German Ufa Studio films, Käthe Kollwitz, Neue Sachlichkeit). Prerequisites: GERM 375. Spring semester, alternate years.

GERM 389 Special Topics
Topics of special interest dealing with German literature, civilization or culture. Courses may be taken at the college or abroad (GERM 393) and more than once for credit if topics differ. Often taught as a beginning writing class with analysis of short literary texts, a course on the fairy tale genre, a film class, or as a business German class. Prerequisites: GERM 304 or GERM 305, GERM 375 or GERM 376, instructor’s consent.

GERM 390 Advanced Conversation, Grammar, and Composition
This course reviews German grammatical structures, syntax and idioms. Special emphasis is given to developing facility in oral expression. In addition, written proficiency in the language is developed through drills, vocabulary exercises and compositions. Prerequisites: GERM 304, GERM 375 and GERM 376 or instructor’s consent. Study abroad, or as an arranged course.

GERM 400 Senior Capstone Seminar
This course will examine contemporary issues in post-1945 German society through various media, including literature. Focus will vary from year to year, but will generally include the following topics: post-war Germany, the “German Question” (division of Germany), Frisch, Dürrenmatt, immigration policies, Neo-Nazism, the European Community, and women’s issues. Often taught as a seminar on Max Frisch’s novel, Homo faber, or Christa Wolf’s novel, Cassandra. Prerequisites: GERM 304 or GERM 305; GERM 375 or GERM 376. For German majors and minors only.

GERM 490 Independent Study (2 or 4 credits)
For upper-level students in lieu of a regular course. Plan of work must be approved before registering. Students will be assigned reports, a paper and an examination. Prerequisite: Two courses above GERM 204. Further German courses are available at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay when advanced students need classes not offered in a given semester.

Greek

GREK / CLAS 111 Elementary Greek 1
An introduction to Attic Greek with emphasis on the grammar, syntax and vocabulary necessary for reading Greek prose and poetry. Fall semester.

GREK / CLAS 112 Elementary Greek 2 (Core: SL)
A continuation of CLAS 111, with extended reading passages in Greek prose and poetry. Prerequisite: CLAS 111. Spring semester.

GREK / CLAS 213 Intermediate Greek (Core: SL)
Continued study of grammar, syntax and vocabulary of Greek prose and poetry. Readings may include selections from Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato, or early Christian texts. Prerequisite: CLAS 112. Fall semester.

Hebrew

HEBR 101 Elementary Biblical Hebrew
This course introduces students to the language of the Hebrew Bible and the historical and theological methods that arise from studying the Hebrew Bible in its original language. No prior knowledge of Biblical Hebrew is assumed. The course begins by introducing the alphabet: students should be able to read many prose passages in the Hebrew Bible with relative ease and occasional recourse to the aid of a Hebrew-English lexicon. Fall semester, alternate years. 

HEBR 102 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew
The course is a continuation of HEBR 101. Students are exposed to longer prose passages of the Hebrew Bible, further nuances of Hebrew syntax and the rudiments of Biblical poetry. Spring semester, alternate years. Prerequisite: HEBR 101 or instructor’s consent. 

History

HIST 112 History of Western Civilization 1: From the Bronze Age to the Renaissance (Core: WT)
This course explores the development of Western Civilization from its origins in ancient Iraq to its flowering in Renaissance Europe. Key topics include society and belief in the ancient Near East; Greek philosophy, theater and politics; Roman imperialism and urbanism; Christian origins; Islamic contributions to the West; Medieval monarchy, universities and the papacy; and Renaissance art and humanism. This course seeks to provide students with a keen awareness of our debt to past cultures and with new perspectives on where human civilization may be headed. Fall semester.

HIST 113 History of Western Civilization 2: Early Modern and Modern Europe (Core: WT)
This course will examine the development of Western civilization from circa 1500 to the end of the Cold War. After a brief treatment of the intellectual expansion called the Renaissance, this survey course studies the Age of Exploration and European expansion beyond its geographical borders, thereby introducing the theme of colonialism in Western history. Other major themes of the course include the evolution of ideas, mentalities and, more broadly, Western culture; the development of political systems; and the emergence of various structures and forces in social and economic life. As an historical overview, this course gives attention to famous leaders and dramatic events, as well as examining ordinary people, their daily lives and the continuities in Western civilization. Fall semester.

HIST / AMER 114 History of the United States 1 (Core: DD)
This course will trace the political, social, and cultural development of the U.S. from its pre-Columbian origins through the Civil War. From encounters between early colonists and Native Americans, to midwives tending to colonial women, to 19th-century laborers adjusting to industrial changes, and finally to the slave trade, this course will pay particular attention to the role of race, class, and gender in shaping society and politics.

HIST / AMER 115 History of the United States 2 (Core: DD)
This course will trace the political, social, and cultural development of the U.S. from Reconstruction to the present. From Jim Crow segregation, to labor organizing during the Great Depression, to women’s rights movements, to the debates over immigration, this course will pay particular attention to the role of race, class, and gender in shaping society and politics.

HIST 117 Survey of African History 1 (Core: BB)
This course surveys select topics in the social, economic and political history of Africa.  We will explore the great medieval West African kingdoms and empires, trans-Saharan and Indian Ocean trading networks, the importance of Africa's resources, including gold, to the medieval world economy, and the involvement of Africans in Atlantic trade. Fall semester.

HIST 119 Survey of African History 2 (Core: BB)
This course explores topics in the social, economic and political history of Africa from 1800 on.  We will explore select pre-colonial powers, European colonization and its effects, the pre-colonial economic and political roles of African women and how these changed with colonialism, and the independence movements which led to colonialism's end. Spring semester.

HIST 120 Survey of Middle Eastern History (Core: BB)
This course traces the major political, social, economic and intellectual developments that have shaped the Middle East over the past 1,400 years. Beginning with the career of the prophet Muhammad and the rise of Islam in the seventh century, it follows the processes of political unification and cultural integration from early Arab rule to the aftermath of World War I. Special attention is given to Islamic civilization – what it achieved and what it has meant to the people of the Middle East. Fall semester.

HIST 122 Modern East Asia (Core: BB)
An introductory survey of the major developments in China, Japan, Korea and Southeast Asia from 1600 to the present. Topics include modernization, the reaction to the West, nationalism, communism and postwar trends. Fall semester.

HIST 130 History of Latin America (Core: BB)
After examining the Native American and Iberian civilizations of the late 15th century, this course will survey the European conquest and colonization of Latin America, the evolution of colonial society, and the reforms and revolutions that led to Latin American independence. The course then traces the history of the major Latin American nations to the present, emphasizing the themes of political development, the role of the military, social justice and economic development. Fall semester.

HIST 210 Making History: Truth and Myth
This course is designed to give History majors a better understanding of the many ways in which the past has been retrieved, sorted and recorded to create what we call "history." Often this process has involved a search for the truth, based upon verifiable evidence, in order to explain the present; perhaps just as often, it has also meant the distortion of facts, the invention of traditions, and the (re)making of myths in the service of some political or other agenda. We will begin by surveying several of the better known schools of historical writing, starting with the Classical Greeks and ending with the Post-Modernists and World Historians. Next, we will investigate some examples of historical writing as they apply to the history of the Middle East. Ultimately, we will hope to better understand what is meant by the expression "the use and abuse of history." Spring semester, alternate years.

HIST 211 Research Methods in History
This course will introduce students to historical research methods and familiarize them with the tools and techniques that historians use to study the past, with a focus on United States History. Topics will include developing historical questions, conducting library and archival research, and producing historical writing. The class will also visit historical archives and talk with practitioners in the world of history: archivists, reference librarians, museum curators, academics, and public historians. By the end of the course students will understand how and why historians conduct research on past events. Spring semester, alternate years.

HIST 311 Mexico Since Independence
This course examines the political, economic, social and cultural development of Mexico from its attainment of independence in the early 19th century to the present. Major topics include the emergence of political strongmen and patron-client relations, Mexico’s relations with the U.S. and other foreign powers, the Native Americans’ loss of their land and agrarian reform, urbanization and migration, the Revolution, and the development of the one-party state. This seminar course also emphasizes students’ development in the areas of critical and analytical thinking and effective oral and written expression. Alternate years.

HIST 312 Social History of the United States
This course will study those people of the U.S. who have not made headlines but have nonetheless made history: at home (the family), at school (education), at worship (religion), at work (labor), at play (leisure), in community (race relations), and in conflict (crime and punishment). It will trace their journeys from the country’s colonial past to the present and will assess their impact on the nation’s successes and setbacks.

HIST 320 Genocide
Although "Never Again" is an important post-Holocaust slogan, the reality is that genocides have been occurring with increasing frequency since 1945. This course will explore two lesser-known genocides: the Armenian Genocide of 1915 and the Rwandan Genocide of 1994.  We will also explore the conditions that make a society ripe for genocide, and consider strategies for preventing genocide, and for moving forward in its profoundly traumatic wake. Fall semester, alternate years.

HIST 321 The Spanish Conquest of the Americas
This course examines the historic encounter of the Native Americans and the Spanish in the first decades after 1492. The course focuses on the political organizations, social structures, economic systems, and cultures of Spanish and indigenous civilizations; it explores Spanish and Indian perspectives; and it assesses the historical consequences of conflict and accommodation in 16th-century America.Alternate years.

HIST / AMER 322 American Immigration and Ethnic History
This course traces the history of immigration to the United States from the nineteenth century to the present.  In the 19th century waves of immigrants arrived in the U.S., building communities and sparking outrage among native Americans. Today many descendants of these immigrants call for tighter border control.  This course will examine immigrant characteristics and motivations, as well as legislation that has defined what it means to be American and changed patterns of migration. Throughout, we will ask, what does it mean to be an immigrant in this nation, and what does it mean to be a nation of immigrants.  Alternate years.

HIST / AMER 324 Poverty, Charity and Welfare in American History
This course will examine the poor in modern America: from orphans in Chicago's Home for the Friendless, to sharecroppers in the Great Depression, to Reagan's notorious welfare queen of the 1980s.  We will analyze primary and secondary sources to understand why people were poor and how they coped with the insecurity and instability of poverty, and to investigate America's various anti-poverty crusades.  Finally, considering the majority of non-white men and women living below the poverty line, we will pay particular attention to race and gender, and ask how Americans have responded to, and at times perpetuated, this disparity.  Alternate years.

HIST / CLAS 326 The History of Ancient Greece
This course explores ancient Greek civilization from its dawn in the second millennium B.C. to its absorption by the Roman Empire in the third century B.C. Key themes will include tyranny and democracy; innovations in philosophy and science; competition through warfare and athletics; mythology, poetry and history; and new standards in art and architecture. This course seeks to illustrate how different the world would be without the vibrant and creative culture of ancient Greece. Fall semester, alternate years.

HIST / AMER / WMGS 327 Women and Gender in United States History
This course will explore women and gender in American history from colonial America to the present.  Students will examine how gender norms changed throughout history and how individuals interacted with those norms. They will analyze how women and notions about gender shaped American politics: through cultural trends like fashion; through family and daily life; and through social movements such as suffrage, temperance, and welfare rights.  We will ask, when did gender constrict the choices that individuals faced, and when did individuals expand and even disassemble gender norms?  Alternate years.

HIST / CLAS 328 The History of Ancient Rome
This course is an exploration of Roman civilization from its origin in a tiny Italian village in the 8th century B.C. to the decline of its vast empire in the fifth century A.D. Key themes include political, administrative and legal achievements; conquest, imperialism and multiculturalism; the shift from republic to empire; daily life in town and country; the impact of Christianity; and architecture and urbanism. This course is designed to provide the student with a firm grounding in the Roman experience and a keen awareness of what we today owe the Romans of the distant past. Spring semester, alternate years.

HIST 329 The History of Medieval Europe
This course examines the dynamic period of change in Europe from the fading of the Roman Empire through the flowering of the High Renaissance. Key topics include the fusion of Roman, Germanic and Christian cultures; warfare and kingship; the relative powers of church and state; creation of representative assemblies and universities; theology, philosophy and science; Europe and the Middle East; heresy and reform; and Romanesque, Gothic and Renaissance art and architecture. This course seeks to illustrate how different medieval people were from us, yet also how we are very clearly their political, cultural and spiritual descendants. Fall semester, alternate years.

HIST 331 History of the Byzantine Empire
This course will introduce students to the “other half” of Europe’s Middle Ages, the eastern half with a focus on the Byzantine Empire. The Byzantine Empire had tremendous theological, artistic and legal influence on western Europe in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. It served as a model of advanced politics and diplomacy, of trade and commerce, and as a military bulwark against Islamic invaders, preventing their assault on eastern Europe for nearly 800 years. Spring semester, alternate years.

HIST 332 The History of Imperial Spain
This course surveys Spanish history from the reign of Ferdinand and Isabella to Spain’s loss of its American colonies in the early 19th century. Topics include religious unity and conflict, the roles of empire and war, society and culture, 18th-century reform, and Spain’s rise and decline.

HIST 333 Cuba: Colony to Castro
This course examines the history of Cuba from the late 18th century to the present; this period begins with a sugar boom and the development of African slavery in the Spanish colony and ends with Cuba’s current difficulties in a post-Soviet world. Other topics of the course include the Cubans’ struggles for independence from Spain, relations with the U.S., monoculture and the export economy, political institutions and political change, race and class relations, and the Cuban Revolution (a significant portion of the course treats Cuba since 1959). This course aims to enhance the students’ knowledge and understanding of Cuba’s past and place in Latin American and world history.

HIST / WMGS 335 Women and Work
This course examines the topic of women and work historically, with attention to changes over time in the work histories of African and American women. Throughout, we will explore women’s working lives in the context of the gendered social norms within which they have lived. Within this general framework, the course will examine occupations including domestic work, prostitution, farming, market trading and professional/managerial work. The course will also explore the intersections of work with marriage and parenting and the effects of race and class upon women’s working lives. Fall semester, alternate years.

HIST 340 Israel/Palestine: The Roots of the Arab-Israeli Conflict
This course examines the origins and development of Jewish-Arab rivalry in the Middle East, beginning with the advent of Zionism in the 19th century and concluding with a review of current events. Social and economic dimensions of the conflict are considered alongside the political history. Students are introduced to a wide range of materials on the topic. Spring semester, alternate years.

HIST 341 Islam and Victorianism in Nineteenth-Century Africa
This course focuses on the lives and legends of two charismatic figures of the nineteenth century – Charles G. Gordon, the Victorian martyr-hero and Muhammad Ahmad al-Mahdi, the Sudanese holy man and revolutionary. After considering the ideals which each man died trying to uphold, we examine a variety of accounts of their lives in an attempt to understand the cultures that created these men and the discipline of history that explains them. Fall semester, alternate years.

HIST 343 The Modern Middle East
This course is designed to introduce students to the central issues of 19th- and 20th-century Middle Eastern history: imperialism, nationalism, secularism, modernization and Westernization and the resurgence of militant Islam. The course begins with the decline of the Ottoman Empire and then examines in detail the experiences of several countries, including Turkey, Egypt, Iran, Lebanon and Saudi Arabia. The course concludes with a survey of the present conflicts in the region, seeking to understand them in their historical dimensions. Prerequisite: HIST 120 or instructor’s consent. Fall semester, alternate years.

HIST 344 Colonialism in Africa Through the Novel
This course examines Africa during the years following 1900, when most of the continent came under European political control. Six novels written by Africans will be read which, in contrast to standard histories of Africa, give the reader a rich understanding of what the colonial period in Africa meant for Africans in their daily lives. Topics to be addressed include the effects of colonialism on existing African social, economic and political institutions; African responses to colonialism; anti- colonial movements; and missionary activity in Africa. The novels will be supplemented by more conventional historical materials including a brief African history text. Fall semester, alternate years.

HIST 345 Slavery in World History (Adv. Core: WT)
This course contrasts American slavery with forms of unfree labor in other parts of the world. Six topics are covered, the precedents – slavery in the ancient world, Islamic Middle East and pre-colonial Africa; the slave experience in the Americas, including Brazil, the Caribbean and the U.S.; the economy of slavery and its effects in Africa and the Americas; slave resistance; the abolition of slavery in Africa and the Americas; and the legacies of slavery in the Americas – miscegenation, racial identity and relations, and economic development. Spring semester, alternate years.

HIST 350 The History of Modern Europe (Adv. Core: WT)
This course explores the political, social, economic, military and cultural aspects of modernity in the European context from the French Revolution to the collapse of the Soviet Union. Key topics include Enlightenment values; revolution and reaction; industrial society; Romanticism, socialism and communism; nationalism, imperialism and totalitarianism; world wars and Cold War; and Europe united. This course seeks to illustrate how the ideas, movements, conflicts and personalities of modern Europe have shaped our contemporary ways of thinking, feeling and living. Spring semester.

HIST / WMGS 351 Women, Gender, and Imperialism
From the 1850s through the 1950s, Western women played significant roles in the British colonies in Africa and India in the fields of education, public health and missionary work. These women believed that they could improve the lives of non-Western women by acculturating them to the norms of their own middle-class, Western and Christian lives. The course will explore how these women tried to reshape key social institutions in Africa and India such as marriage, parenting, medical practices and religion. This course will also explore how the women and men these individuals came to “civilize” in turn shaped the cross-cultural encounter through their powerful reactions to the often unwelcome acculturating messages they received. The course draws upon historical material and autobiographical, literary, missionary and travelers’ accounts to investigate these events. Spring semester, alternate years.

HIST 354 Issues in the Contemporary Middle East
This course allows History majors with an emphasis on the Middle East to examine the historical roots of the most pressing issues in the region today. While the course content is expected to change somewhat each time it is taught, subjects of likely interest are U.S. involvement in the region since World War I, the Shi’ite revival since the Iranian revolution, the spread of political Islam (e.g., the Muslim Brothers, al-Qa’ida, and ISIS), and the revolts of the “Arab Spring.” Students are encouraged to take HIST 343 before this course to familiarize themselves with 20th century developments. Prerequisite: HIST 120. Spring semester, alternate years.

HIST 361 Modern China
This course examines the values and institutions of traditional China as they functioned during the last dynasty (the Qing Dynasty) and the process of Westernization/modernization which resulted in the disintegration of many of these values and institutions. The course covers the period from 1644, when the Qing Dynasty was founded, through its overthrow in the 1911 revolution, to the fall of the Republic of China in 1949. The bulk of the course will deal with the century from the Opium War in 1840 to the victory of the Chinese Communists in 1949. Alternate years.

HIST 362 Modern Japan
A study of Japan from 1600 to the present, focusing primarily on the period after 1853 and the arrival of Commodore Perry. This course studies the Tokugawa period and its downfall, the initial attraction to, and later estrangement from, the West, the role of ultra-nationalism both domestically and in foreign policy leading to the Pacific War, and finally, the American occupation and post-war development. Alternate years.

HIST 363 Contemporary China
A seminar which examines communism from its beginnings in 1921 to the present, with an emphasis on the period after 1949 and includes the rise of Mao, ideological development, foreign policy, relations with the U.S., the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, and the leadership of Deng Xiaoping, Jiang Zemin, Hu Jintao, and Xi Jinping. Spring semester, Alternate years.

HIST 364 Modern Korea
An examination of Korea’s history, culture, society, politics and foreign relations during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include traditional Choson Dynasty Korea and its decline (1392-1910), the coming of the West, Japanese imperialism and big power rivalry, domestic factionalism, the colonial period and the resultant independence movement, including the role of overseas Koreans (1910-45), the American occupation, division into hostile regimes, and current issues facing both North Korea and South Korea (1945-present). Alternate years.

HIST 368 The Asian American Experience (Adv. Core: DD)
An examination of the immigration of East Asians (Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans) to the United States and the formation of Chinese-American, Japanese-American, and Korean-American communities from the 19th century to the present.

HIST 370 The End of the World (Adv. Core: WT)
This course examines the many ways that beliefs about a final judgment and an end-time event (“Apocalypse”) have been put into action in Western and non-Western societies during periods of acute crisis. Students will be exposed to a variety of disciplinary approaches to the study of millenarian movements, and will be expected to reflect critically in class discussions and essays on the values that these movements reflect and their change or continuity across space and time. The course concludes with an examination of contemporary American millenarian beliefs. Spring semester, alternate years.

HIST 389 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
A course taught at intervals by a member of the faculty, dealing with a topic in European, Latin American, Asian, African, Middle Eastern or U.S. history. The topic will be announced each time the course is offered. The course, which counts as an advanced course in the area of concentration in which the topic falls, may be taken more than once, for credit, if the topic is different.

HIST 490 Independent Study (2 or 4 credits)
A tutorial course for majors only involving either a directed reading program in an area of special interest to the student or a project based on research under the supervision of a faculty member.

Honors Program

HONR 101 Introduction to Honors (Core: WI)
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of a Catholic, Norbertine, liberal arts education. The focus of the course is on the understanding of the creation, development, and dynamics of communities. We will examine specific communities within our larger Fox River area community (ethnic communities, religious communities, and neighborhood communities). Critical thinking skills and inquiry methods will be used to help determine a topic of interest, identify a problem, create a question, and study an issue. Required “texts” will include scholarly articles, literary works, media, interviews, and field-based explorations. Objectives of the course include an understanding of the Norbertine heritage of the college, an awareness of and appreciation for “different ways of knowing,” and increased information literacy and communication skills. Prerequisite: honors program member. Fall semester. 

HONR 289 Honors Tutorial (2 credits)
Honors tutorials are designed to promote and facilitate intellectual discussion and collaboration between faculty and students. Students enroll in a series of three mini- courses, each capped at three to four students, which meet for nine weeks during the semester. Topics are chosen by faculty members and are based on either their academic area of expertise or a particular avocation. Recent tutorial topics have included “Food as Culture and Philosophy,” and “The Rhetoric of Sports,” “Buddhism and Neuroscience,” and “The Irish Independence: The Easter Rising of 1916.” A semester of tutorials substitutes for one honors course. A student may enroll in tutorials twice (two semesters of tutorials) or once if studying abroad. Prerequisite: permission of the honors program director and minimum GPA of 3.4. Graded on an S/U basis.

HONR 301 Preparing for Life After SNC (2 credits)
This course is designed to encourage sophomore-level students to reflect on their personal and professional goals, as well as to instruct them in the steps they must take and the skills they must master if they are to successfully transition from college to graduate or professional school. The course covers such topics as: writing an excellent personal statement; evaluating co-curricular activities; letters of recommendation; choosing the program that best suits your goals, interests, and budget, and preparing for the interviews. Open to honors program students only. Prerequisite: permission of the honors program director, minimum GPA of 3.4, sophomore standing or greater. Graded on an S/U basis. Spring semester.

HONR 302 Coexistence in Medieval Spain (Adv. Core: WT)
This four-credit honors travel-seminar offers students the opportunity to study the intersection and coexistence of the Jewish, Christian and Muslim cultures in early-modern Spain. During pre-departure seminars, students will reflect on the historical events and the social and religious values that permitted the coexistence. They will then spend approximately two weeks in Spain over J-Term, visiting and studying the most important sites of what was once Muslim Spain: Toledo, Córdoba and Granada. The assignments will include the development of a claim/inquiry, writing assignments, presentations, and the development of an inquiry which they will present via an infographic. Prerequisite: permission of the honors program director.

HONR 303 Modern Spanish Art and Architecture (Adv. Core: EI)
This four-credit honors travel-seminar offers students the opportunity to study the history of modern Spanish art in situ. Topics addressed will include the relationship between commissioner and artist; patriotism, nationalism, and war; the interplay between public and private; and the enduring influence of Muslim aesthetics. Students will attend a series of pre-departure seminars before spending approximately two weeks in Spain over J-Term where they will visit the Prado, the Reina Sofía, and the Thyssen Bornemisza Museums in Madrid, as well as museums and sites in such locations as Toledo, Bilbao, and Barcelona. The assignments will include the development of a claim/inquiry, writing assignments, presentations, and the development of an inquiry which they will present via an infographic. Prerequisite: permission of the honors program director.

HONR 499 Honors Program Senior Thesis (0 credits)
Honors students are encouraged to produce a signature assignment – an original, integrative project which allows students to use their accumulated skills and knowledge to study an important question, test a hypothesis, or produce something truly creative. The assignment is generally associated with the students’ majors, but draws from the students’ other fields / areas of interest. The form of these assignments varies widely, and may include an exhibit, a video, a creative project, a research project, or a performance. Prerequisite: permission of the honors program director and minimum GPA of 3.4. Graded on an S/U basis.

Humanities

HUMA 100 Introduction to the Humanities Through the Fine Arts (Core: EI, WI)
This course aims to help students understand ways in which literature and the fine arts can deepen their sense of what it means to be human. The course gives students practice in appreciating masterpieces of painting, music, poetry, prose narrative and theater. Required for humanities majors.

HUMA 240 Classic American Novels (Core: WT)
This course is designed for the general student to provide her or him with in-depth knowledge of some of the great novels that make up the American literary tradition. Seven or eight novels are selected each time it is offered from a list that might include such works as Hawthorne’s “The Scarlet Letter,” Twain’s “Huckleberry Finn,” Wharton’s “The Age of Innocence,” Cather’s “A Lost Lady,” Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby,” Hemingway’s “The Sun Also Rises,” Hurston’s “Their Eyes Were Watching God,” Spiegelman’s “Maus,” and Alexie’s “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian.” Such works help the student understand the distinctive American culture and how it developed in all its diversity.

HUMA 252 French Society and Culture (Core: BB)
This course offers an overview of the history of French civilization – its history (specifically the French Revolution), its political institutions, and long tradition of excellence in the arts – but focuses on the relevance of France in the world today, as a leader within the European Union and also as a nation at odds with itself, as it were, struggling with its postcolonial heritage, permanent unemployment of more than 10 per cent, doubts about national identity, and the mounting threat of terrorism from within its borders.

HUMA 280 Japanese Culture and Society (Core: BB)
This interdisciplinary course provides students with a framework for understanding contemporary Japan. Students will examine a wide range of topics such as education, business, mass media, sports, family life, art, language and literature in relation to such major themes as hierarchical structure, group consciousness, emphasis on form and persistence of tradition in modern society. Lectures, discussion, audiovisual aids and readings in various disciplines will be part of the class.

HUMA 313 Stories of War (Adv. Core: EI)
Every armed conflict generates stories. Governments tell stories about the cause, justifications, and progress of a war. Soldiers and civilians tell stories about fear, pain, death, ethical and moral struggles, and all the other elements that make up a suddenly dangerous life. Writers and film makers, either during a war or long after it ends, translate these accounts into works of literature and film. This course will focus on how 20th-century literature and film represents war. We’ll consider the wide range of experiences depicted in these texts, the narrative conventions used to impact their audiences, and the difficult questions that are often at the heart of a narrative about war.

HUMA 315 German Identity Through Film (Adv. Core: WT)
A survey course on German films in the modern period (1945-2017). Fall semester.

HUMA 337 Communio and the Norbertines Across the Centuries (Adv. Core: CI)
This course will explore the concept of communio as living from and in God in community. Students explore communio at the beginning of Creation and its expression in the common life of the early Jerusalem community in the Acts of the Apostles. The course continues by exploring St. Augustine’s model of life for his religious communities set forth in this Rule which Norbert of Xanten accepted as a core element in his reform of 12th century Catholic life. Students will study Norbert’s life and a summary history of his Order, especially its missionary activity, with a special focus on the establishment of the Order in the United States. They will study the retrieval of the concept of communio in the Second Vatican Council and then as a key concept in the Norbertine Constitutions. This will provide a strong base for understanding the college’s Catholic, liberal arts and Norbertine mission.

HUMA 389 Special Topics
This course concentrates on a topic pertinent to the current needs and interests of students. Primarily the focus will be placed on topics which cross disciplinary lines and involve two or more Humanities disciplines. Topics will vary and will be announced in the course listings.

HUMA 403 Ideal Societies (Adv. Core: WT)
This course addresses the fundamental question: What political and social system best provides for the common welfare? Various answers (and warnings) are considered through readings from political philosophy, social commentary, and utopian and anti-utopian literature ranging from classical times to the 20th century with the intention of stimulating reflection on issues and events in contemporary society.

HUMA 407 Science, Literature and Culture
This course will introduce students to the essential interdisciplinary nature of any field of study as we consider the personal and social implications of literary books written about science (or using science) to explore issues of nature and human nature. Through our efforts here, students should aim to understand scientific and literary methods and to improve as readers, thinkers and writers.

HUMA 411 Vietnam in the Western Imagination (Adv. Core: WT)
An examination of the American involvement in Vietnam through its symbolic history, the finest novels, personal memoirs, and films on the war. Primary texts — appraised as both aesthetic responses and cultural documents — will include the written works of Grahame Greene, Philip Caputo, Tim O’Brien, Bobbie Ann Mason and others. Films by directors such as Francis Coppola, Michael Cimino, Oliver Stone and Stanley Kubrick will also be examined.

HUMA 422 Slavery in Antebellum America (Adv. Core: WT)
This course traces the legacy of slavery as it played out during the mid-19th century, primarily in the United States. At this point in our nation’s history, slavery had coexisted with Christianity and democracy for more than 1,000 years, yet emancipated slaves and leaders of the abolition movement crafted non-fiction testimonials and novels designed to eradicate slavery. Emancipated slaves such as Frederick Douglass, Solomon Northup and Harriet Jacobs published slave narratives graphically depicting the gross injustices that slaves suffered. They argued that this suffering affected all Americans regardless of their residence in the free or slave states, and they invoked democratic ideals and Christian doctrines to win their readers to the abolitionist cause.

HUMA 424 Sport and Society
Introduction to sports as a cultural phenomenon. The ethos of sport. History of sports in Western culture. Sports and the arts. Sports and nationalism. Race, gender and sports. Religion and sports. Youth and sports. The modern business of sports.

HUMA 489 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
This is a seminar course offered whenever a mutual interest in a more specialized topic in the Humanities exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students.

HUMA 490 Independent Study
A course allowing instructors and students to explore together topics of special interest.

HUMA 494 Internship
An academic internship for credit involves the application of disciplinary or interdisciplinary concepts to work experience and includes a very specific academic component, which is detailed and agreed to by all parties in advance of the internship experience. The academic focus of the internship for credit should be woven through the internship experience in a meaningful way under the expert guidance of the faculty member. Prerequisite: junior/senior standing.

Interdivisional Studies

IDIS 100 College Writing
This course helps students develop and discipline their powers of written communication. Students will learn about the composing process – planning, shaping, writing, revising, editing and proofreading – and how to apply this process to a series of college writing assignments that include personal narratives, informational summaries, persuasive essays and documented research essays. IDIS 100 can be taken as an elective by students who feel a need for a composition course. The course is required for students who demonstrate a need for a college writing course (as determined by a timed writing sample, college admission scores and high school record). 

IDIS 110 Academic Survival Skills (2 credits)
This course is designed to increase students’ success in college by assisting them in obtaining necessary skills to reach their educational objectives. Topics in the course include time management, study techniques, beginning career decision making, test taking, reading for understanding and retention, note taking, college resources, decision making and memory techniques. 

IDIS 115 College Preparation and Reading (2 credits)
This course presents reading and study techniques that will enhance the students’ ability to read and retain college-level material. Students will learn to implement general strategies for dealing with course material and strategies to improve vocabulary acquisition, reading rate, critical thinking and comprehension. It also addresses executive function skills and goal setting strategies designed to enhance efficient and effective learning. 

IDIS 120 Success Program Participation (2 credits)
This program assists students in reaching their full academic potential by regularly monitoring academic performance, improving study skills and providing guidance necessary to complete college-level work. The SUCCESS program is offered by the Academic Support Services department. Open only to students who are required to participate as a condition of initial or continued enrollment. Repeatable. 

IDIS 150 Gap Seminar (0 credits)
The purpose of the seven-week course is to provide students who have had substantial service-learning experiences off campus with an opportunity to analyze their experiences, continue to learn about their host cultures, their home cultures, and to better understand the process of cross-cultural learning and intercultural exchange. Many students describe off-campus learning experiences as “transformative,” without the ability to articulate how. This course will provide them with the perspective and the knowledge to do so.

IDIS 310 Language Analysis and Applied Linguistics
This course familiarizes students with different fields of applied linguistics and language analysis, including grammar, semantics, phonology, phonetics, discourse analysis, language acquisition and social linguistics. This course is a requirement for ESL certification. Prerequisite: ENGL 290 or instructor’s consent. 

IDIS 389 Special Topics in Interdivisional Studies
This course concentrates on a topic pertinent to the current needs and interests of students. Primarily, it focuses on topics which cross division lines and involves two or more interdivisional disciplines.

IDIS 494 Internship
This tuition-free internship course allows non-credit internships to be listed on students’ academic transcript. Students are allowed to register for the IDIS 494 course for each term they intern, regardless of whether they are continuing to intern with the same company or with a new company. Course signup will be based on a semester basis as well as an experience basis. For each IDIS 494 listing, the student must return a completed internship learning agreement to Career Services within one week of their start date, participate in a mid-term site visit upon request, and complete an end-of-term online evaluation, which will be dispersed to all student interns regarding the internship experience and to worksite supervisors regarding student performance. Additionally, students are required to work a minimum of 60 hours at the internship site, which will be documented on the end- of-term evaluations by both the worksite supervisor and the student intern. Students must be interning during the term they are taking the course. Graded: S/U.

International Business & Language Area Studies

IBLS 362 Study Abroad: History Elective
Designation used to indicate that an appropriate course taken during study abroad fulfills the IBLAS history requirement.

International Studies

INTL / POLI 150 Introduction to International Studies (Core: BB)
The objective of this course is to promote an awareness of global interdependence, with its challenges and opportunities. The course is interdisciplinary — examining issues from several relevant and related points of view: political, ecological, cultural, economic and ethical. The content may vary from semester to semester. Examples of issues the course might examine are nationalism vs. the concept of an international community; U.S. foreign policy and human rights; foreign policy of communist countries; cultural diversity and international cooperation.

INTL 289 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
A study of a single topic of special interest to one or more students. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and approval by the director of international studies is required.

INTL / WMGS 300 Contemporary Latin American Literature and Culture (Core: BB)
This course covers Latin American literature and culture of the 20th and 21st centuries across a variety of mediums, including film, music, telenovelas, pop culture, social media, news and current events, as well as comics and graphic novels, short stories, poetry, and novels, among others. The course will be structured around the following themes: Indigenous and Afro-Latinx communities; the Latin American Boom and Post-Boom; Latin American dictatorships and U.S.-Latin American relations; and Immigration and the U.S. Latinx experience. We will pay particular attention to the history of European colonialism and its legacies; U.S. socio-economic imperialism; and the intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, and citizenship. Spring semester.

INTL 361 Study Abroad: Political Science Elective
Designation used to indicate an appropriate course taken during study abroad fulfills the requirement to take an international studies political science elective in the student’s area of interest.

INTL 363 Study Abroad: Language and Area Studies Elective
Designation used to indicate an appropriate course taken during study abroad fulfills the international studies language and area studies elective requirement.

INTL 364 Study Abroad: Indigenous Language
Designation used to indicate an appropriate course taken during study abroad fulfills the international studies indigenous language requirement for areas other than Spanish, German, French and Japanese.

INTL 375 Study Abroad: Civilization Study
Designation used to indicate an appropriate course taken during study abroad fulfills the international studies civilization requirement.

INTL 385 Reflection and Integration (2 credits)
The purpose of this course is to help students process their study abroad experience.  By means of digital storytelling, students will critically reflect on new experiences, articulate the deeper meaning of these experiences, and integrate this learning into expression of self. Students will also explore the interconnectedness of historical, socio-cultural, political, and educational issues. Prerequisite: Completed participation in an approved study abroad program. Credit/No credit.

INTL 400 International Studies Capstone
The International Studies Capstone provides International Studies majors with a culminating and integrative experience at the end of the major. This course is required for graduation. Students will explore and analyze various international events, problems, or phenomena, sharing the interdisciplinary tools they have gained throughout the course of their studies.  Students will be required to participate in an undergraduate research conference and complete an international education practicum as part of their senior capstone. Prerequisite: POLI 350.  Spring semester.

INTL 489 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
A study of a single topic of special interest to one or more students.  Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and approval by the director of international studies is required.

INTL 490 Independent Study (2 or 4 credits)
A tutorial course involving either a directed reading program in an area of special interest to the student or a project based on research conducted under the supervision of a faculty member.  Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and approval by the director of international studies is required.

INTL 494 Internship in International Studies
The internship experience allows students to apply their studies in a supervised work situation.  Students benefit from gaining an inside look at one or more organizations, by having the chance to work in their field of study, and by gaining experience with state-of-the-art equipment and practices.  Permission of the instructor and approval by the director of international studies is required.

Japanese

JAPN 101 Elementary Japanese 1
An intensive introduction to practical Japanese with an emphasis placed on the four language skills: understanding, speaking, reading and writing. Required laboratory work. Fall semester.

JAPN 102 Elementary Japanese 2 (Core: SL)
Continuation of JAPN 101. Prerequisite: JAPN 101. Spring semester.

JAPN 203 Intermediate Japanese 1 (Core: SL)
Short basic readings, conversation and grammar. Required laboratory work. Prerequisite: JAPN 102. Fall semester.

JAPN 204 Intermediate Japanese 2 (Core: SL)
A continuation of JAPN 203 with emphasis on developing facility in oral and written expression. Prerequisite: JAPN 203. Spring semester.

JAPN 305 Intensive Course: Intermediate Readings, Conversation, and Composition
A continuation of JAPN 204 with emphasis on developing facility in oral and written expression. A cultural orientation prior to a study-abroad experience. Prerequisite: JAPN 204.

JAPN 306 Intensive Intermediate Composition and Grammar
A continuation of JAPN 204 with emphasis on developing facility in oral and written expression. Prerequisite: JAPN 204.

JAPN 320 Advanced Intermediate Conversation
A continuation of JAPN 305 with emphasis on developing facility in oral and written expression. Transfer credit from Sophia or Tsuru University for JAPN 320 must be evaluated and approved by the coordinator for Japanese language studies at St. Norbert College. Generally taken abroad.

JAPN 375 Japanese Civilization (Adv. Core: BB)
Emphasis on developing facility in oral expression based on literatures and cultures. A background of history, art and institutions as an aid to the understanding of Japanese thought in literature as well as culture and to appreciate the Japanese people.

JAPN 389 Special Topics
Topics of special interest, dealing with Japanese literature, civilization or culture.

JAPN 390 Advanced Conversation, Grammar, and Composition
Emphasis on developing facility in oral expression based on literature and cultures. Attention to phonetics, pronunciation and syntax. Development of more difficult and sophisticated patterns of expression.

JAPN 490 Independent Study
For upper-level students in lieu of a regular course. Plan of work must be approved before registering. Course includes reports, papers and examination. Transfer credit from Sophia or Tsuru University for JAPN 490 must be evaluated and approved by the coordinator for Japanese language studies at St. Norbert College.

Latin

LATN / CLAS 101 Elementary Latin
An introduction to classical Latin with emphasis on the grammar, syntax and vocabulary necessary for reading Latin prose and poetry. The course also stresses the influence of Latin on English vocabulary. Fall semester.

LATN / CLAS 102 Intermediate Latin (Core: SL)
A continuation of CLAS 101, with extended reading passages in Latin prose and poetry. Prerequisite: CLAS 101. Spring semester.

LATN / CLAS 203 Readings in Latin (Core: SL)
After learning more about Latin grammar, students will translate a variety of texts that will bring them in touch with the rich humanity of thoughtful human beings who lived 2000 years ago. Authors considered will include Catullus, Cicero, Horace and Pliny. Prerequisite: CLAS 102. Fall semester.

LATN / CLAS 204 Advanced Reading in Latin (Core: SL)
This course will continue to develop proficiency in Latin vocabulary and grammar through readings of Latin literature selected by the students. The course will assist students incorporating the Latin language and the skills developed in previous Latin courses into their daily lives and chosen career paths. Prerequisite: CLAS 203.

Leadership Studies

LEAD 100 Introduction to Leadership Studies (Core: IS)
This course focuses on definitional issues (What is leadership?) and explanation (How does it work?). The course also acquaints students with theories and styles of leadership.

LEAD 250 Experiential Leadership Through Wilderness Expedition
This course is available to students enrolled in the SNC Gap Program and is taught in cooperation with the Voyageur Outward Bound School. The course will focus on identifying and learning leadership skills within a small group setting. Students will increase their self-awareness as a member of a team, discover their leadership talents and skills within a group, develop and build interpersonal communication skills, learn to adjust leadership styles within the context of small group dynamics, and understand the values that guide their leadership style.

LEAD 336 Executive Leadership
An examination of executive leadership at the national, state and local levels in the United States. Focuses on leadership development, leadership styles and the impact of leadership in governing. Prerequisite: POLI 130 or LEAD 200. Spring semester, alternate years.

LEAD 360 Gender and Leadership
Gender and Leadership examines a number of questions regarding the relationship of gender and leadership in different contexts: business, the political arena and social movements. The course will address several questions, e.g., the role of gender in the emergence of leaders, the role of gender in the evaluation of leaders, the role of gender in explaining different leadership styles, and the role that gender plays in the success or failure of leaders. The course will examine the theoretical literature on gender and its relationship to leadership from a number of disciplinary perspectives – communications, political science, psychology and sociology. In addition, the course will also use case studies in order to determine the importance of gender and leadership in specific circumstances. Prerequisite: LEAD 200 or sophomore standing.

LEAD 361 Peer Leadership
Leadership can be properly understood in the context of well-run organizational activities, the appropriate exercise of vision and authority, and the intentional application of skills and abilities. But leadership can be especially challenging in interpersonal work, team, or social relationships that revolve around peer behavior. Peer Leadership aims to provide students an opportunity to explore contemporary student development theory, to understand the needs and leadership gifts of a variety of special populations, and to learn about and practice a variety of skills in order to create change. Students in this course will be asked to apply this knowledge to the St. Norbert College residential campus in a way that leads to a changed campus culture and improved quality of life for the campus community.

LEAD 363 Leadership and Civic Engagement
This course explores the connection of leadership as social change to leadership as service. It will help students build a strong theoretical foundation in socially engaged leadership and then apply those theories in community engagement projects. The course demands that students work in small groups with community partners in education, business and non-profit organizations. Prerequisite: LEAD 200.

LEAD 389 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
This is a seminar course offered whenever a mutual interest in a more specialized topic in Leadership Studies exists for a faculty member and a sufficient number of students.

LEAD 400 Leadership Studies Capstone
This course combines skills development and practical applications with the synthesis and integration of theories and concepts of leadership. The course provides students with the opportunity to observe, demonstrate and apply socially responsible leadership on campus and in the community. Prerequisite: LEAD 200, senior standing or instructor’s consent.

Liberal Studies

LIST 501 Introduction to Liberal Studies (3 credits)  
Courses in this area are intended to serve as an introduction to liberal studies and fine arts through the study of significant works from a broad spectrum of areas and disciplines within the liberal arts tradition. Primary sources are selected from a variety of disciplines and time periods; secondary sources related to these primary sources are also considered. Courses in this area emphasize both the interdisciplinary nature of liberal studies and the fact that the most significant questions confronting humankind can be addressed from a variety of intellectual perspectives.This course is divided into three major sections. The first section examines key themes and ideas of the Western intellectual tradition. The second unit surveys the history of the liberal arts and discusses its significance for today's world. The final unit examines the different methodologies used to address fundamental questions of existence with particular attention to interdisciplinary research.

LIST 502 Intellectual History (3 credits)
Courses in this area reflect the fact that throughout history people have employed many and varied means to understand themselves and the universe around them and that over time ideas and concepts change, merge, disappear and then sometimes re-appear. Courses are designed to help students appreciate both the diversity and continuity of human thought. Proceeding chronologically, each course in this area follows some of the ways that ideas evolve, exploring the development of faith, reason, imagination or science in the works of authors who have made a mark on civilization. Both primary and secondary sources are examined.

LIST 503 Ideas and Issues in the Humanities (3 credits)
Courses in this area examine some of the most important ideas and intellectual movements in the history of the humanities, including the fine arts. Readings will come from a variety of subject areas (from literature, philosophy, and history to religious studies and the fine arts) and may include selections from writers and thinkers as diverse as Plato, Dante, Shakespeare, Sartre and Rahner.

LIST 504 Ideas and Issues in the Natural Sciences and Mathematics (3 credits)
Courses in this area will provide an introduction to some of the important current and historical issues in science and mathematics. Possible topics include: evolution; cosmology, quantum mechanics and string theory; genetics (genomics); environmental issues; artificial intelligence; medicine and medical ethics; decidability and incompleteness theorems.

LIST 505 Ideas and Issues in the Social Sciences (3 credits)
Courses in this area address some of the relations between individuals and social organizations (society, culture, economy, law or government). Through readings selected from economics, sociology, psychology, political science, anthropology, education or business, courses may investigate such important social issues as individualism vs. collectivism, freedom vs. coercion, civil society vs. politics, private vs. public, church vs. state, national vs. international, and the associated issues of individual autonomy, social cohesion, democracy, property rights, education, ethnic and cultural identity, international organization, free trade and globalization.

LIST 540 American Perspectives (3 credits)
Courses in this area will address diverse and definitive elements of American culture and influence. Specific classes may deal, for instance, with American history, politics, economy, literature or art, but they will always aim to broaden and deepen students’ appreciation of American heritage and America’s place in the contemporary world by focusing on the works and ideas that have helped shape American traditions.

LIST 545 Classical Perspectives (3 credits)
Courses in this area invite students to think about the historical importance and continuing impact of the cultures (philosophy, literature, art, history and archeology) of ancient Greece and Rome. They may include topics up to the Renaissance, but will focus largely on the Ancient period, showing the essential classical contribution to the development of the Western world. Featured authors may include Homer, Aristotle, Sophocles, Vergil, Lucretius and Ovid.

LIST 550 Diverse Perspectives (3 credits)
In order to introduce students to an increasingly diverse society and intellectual tradition, courses in this area will address the identities and perspectives of diverse populations, based on race, ethnicity, class and/or gender. Occasionally courses may address other underrepresented populations on which there are significant bodies of knowledge.

LIST 555 Ethics and Liberal Studies (3 Credits)
Courses in this area will present the main positions in ethical thought, their development, and their application to contemporary social and political issues. The value of liberal studies for thinking and deciding about ethical issues will be emphasized.

LIST 560 International Perspectives (3 credits)
Focusing on cultures and traditions outside the United States, courses in this area will expand students' understanding and appreciation of the diversity of human experience worldwide. Although approaches may engage disciplines from anthropology and art to economics, politics, science and religion, the learning experience should help students acquire an integrative world view, as well as methods for studying diverse and evolving cultures.

LIST 588 Capstone (2 credits)
This seminar prepares students to research and write their master’s thesis. The first part of the course discusses the similarities and differences in approaching a topic from various scientific and humanistic perspectives; the second part of the course requires students to begin researching their topics, with class time devoted to sharing their initial findings with the rest of the class. At the end of the course, students will be well on their way toward completing their research projects.

LIST 589 Special Topics One Credit Courses
Special topic one credit mini-courses will be offered on a per semester schedule.  Students will be required to take one mini course.  Topics of these course will vary each semester.

LIST 596 Thesis Project I (1 credit)
The student develops and, under the supervision of the thesis director, writes a master’s thesis. The director of M.L.S. must approve thesis directors. Enrollment and registration in this course is available in the fall semester of each academic year. The purpose of the thesis project is to demonstrate the student’s ability to study a problem and utilize the resources available within the liberal studies program to develop a practical approach based on a sound methodology. This approach must be informed by a critical, focused and coherent analysis based on the liberal arts tradition.

LIST 597 Master's Thesis Project II (1 credit)
This course is a continuation of LIST 596, leading to the submission of the master’s thesis. Prior to final approval, a discussion of the project proposed will take place between the student and a panel of three persons (i.e., the thesis project director and two readers), at which time the thesis project is either approved, rejected or conditionally approved with recommendations for improvement. This course will be offered in the spring semester of each year.

LIST 600 Continuing Master's Thesis (0 credit, $100 fee)
If a student does not complete the thesis project while enrolled in LIST 597, students are required to register for this course every semester thereafter until the project is completed. Those students who wish to graduate in May of any year must have the final, completed thesis project turned in no later than March 1 of that year.

Mathematics

MATH 102 Basic Algebra (2 credits)
Topics include numbers and their properties, operations with rational numbers, fundamental operations in algebra, linear equations in one variable, special products and factoring, algebraic fractions, systems of linear equations, exponents and radicals, quadratic equations. Required of students whose placement test indicates inadequate preparation in mathematics. A student who has received credit for MATH 115, MATH 123, MATH 124 or MATH 131 may not take MATH 102 for credit without the registrar’s consent. Fall semester.

MATH 115 Pre-Calculus Mathematics
Primarily for students intending to take MATH 131 but who need more preparation. Topics include basic concepts of set theory, algebraic operations, functions, systems of equations, exponents, logarithms, trigonometry and an introduction to graphing calculators. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or placement. A student who has received credit for MATH 124 or MATH 131 may not take MATH 115 for credit without the registrar’s consent.

MATH 120 Numbers and Operations
Intended for Elementary Education majors, this course examines the mathematical content knowledge underlying the numbers and operations taught in elementary school. Students will explore content in the Common Core State Standards, such as place value; algorithms for addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division; and arithmetic properties of counting numbers, integers, fractions, and decimals. This course focuses on mathematical content, not teaching methods. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or placement.  

MATH 123 Applications of Contemporary Mathematics (Core: QR)
This course is designed to help students recognize the place of mathematics and mathematical reasoning in society. Students will be given the opportunity to enhance their ability to see the relevance of mathematics behind many current topics and to use mathematical techniques to address those topics. Topics include:  mathematics of finance, logic, probability, statistics and counting techniques, graph theory, and additional topics at the instructor’s discretion. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or placement.

MATH 128 Introductory Statistics for Business (Core: QR)
Intended for Business Administration majors, this course offers a background in combinatorics, probability, descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and basic calculus to prepare students to succeed in their business courses and especially BUAD 284.  Students will apply quantitative thinking to practical problems in business and economics.  Prerequisite: MATH 102 or placement.

MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 1 (Core: QR)
Pre-calculus mathematics will be presumed but reviewed as needed. Topics include limits and continuity of functions; the derivative, its meaning, computation and applications; the definite integral, its meaning, computation and applications; differentiation and integration of logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric functions; and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Prerequisite: four years of college preparatory math in high school or MATH 115. Note: students may not receive credit for both MATH 124 and MATH 131.

MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 2 (Core: QR)
Topics include applications of integration, methods of integration, indeterminate forms and improper integrals, elementary differential equations, and series. Prerequisite: MATH 131 or MATH 124.

MATH 203 Linear Algebra (Core: QR)
The course will cover systems of linear of linear equations and their solutions, matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces and linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and inner product spaces.  While linear algebra can be studied at a more theoretical level (e.g. MATH 303), this course will focus on the problem-solving capabilities and applications of linear algebra. Prerequisites: MATH 131 or placement in MATH 132.

MATH 210 Ordinary Differential Equations
Topics include solutions and applications of ordinary differential equations of types including separable variables, homogeneous, exact, linear and non-linear. Includes introduction to differential operators, variation of parameters, Laplace transforms, power series and numerical solutions. Prerequisite: MATH 132. Spring semester.

MATH 212 Principles of Algebra and Data (Core: QR)
Intended for elementary education majors, this course examines the mathematical content knowledge underlying the algebra, number theory, statistics and probability taught in elementary and middle school mathematics. Students will explore ratio and proportion, number theory, algebra, statistics, and probability. This course focuses on mathematical content, not teaching methods. Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in MATH 120. Spring semester.

MATH 220 Principles of Geometry (Core: QR)
Intended for Elementary Education majors, this course examines the mathematical content knowledge underlying the geometry taught in elementary and middle school mathematics. Students will explore measurement including length, area and volume; polygons; constructions; similar and congruent figures; and symmetry. This course focuses on mathematical content, not teaching methods. Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in MATH 120. Fall semester.

MATH 221 Statistics in the Sciences (Core: QR)
The course will cover both descriptive and inferential statistics and how they are used in science and engineering.  Major topics include discrete and continuous random variables, probability and density functions, statistical inference and sample statistics, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and regression analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 131 or placement in MATH 132. Spring semester.

MATH 233 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 3
Topics include parametric equations, polar coordinates, matrices and determinants, vectors and curves in two- and three-dimensional space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, further applications of differentiation and integration, and line integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 132. Fall semester.  

MATH 250 Advanced Foundations of Mathematics
This course is intended to be a transition to abstract mathematics. Topics include logic, the axiomatic method and the nature of proof, sets, relations, functions and 1-1 correspondences, countability, and selected topics in discrete mathematics. Prerequisites: CSCI 110 (or instructor's consent), MATH 132 and MATH 203.

MATH 289 Special Topics
The course topic and title will be announced at the time the course is offered. This course is intended for students at the first-year/sophomore level.

MATH 303 Advanced Linear Algebra
Topics include vector spaces and inner product spaces, linear transformations, matrices and determinants, and eigenvalue problems. Although linear algebra can be studied with an emphasis on computational techniques and column vectors (e.g., MATH 203), this course will focus on proof-writing and the theory of abstract vector spaces. Prerequisite: MATH 250. Fall semester, alternate years.

MATH 306 Abstract Algebra
Topics include groups, cyclic groups, permutation groups, quotient groups, Lagrange’s theorem, homomorphism theorems, rings, ideals, polynomial rings, elementary number theory, integral domains and fields. Prerequisite: MATH 250. Fall semester.

MATH 313 Mathematical Modeling
This course introduces the construction and investigation of mathematical models for real-world problems. Techniques explored involve dimensional analysis; difference, ordinary differential and partial differential equations; fixed point, stability, and phase plane analysis; deterministic and stochastic processes; and computer packages as needed. Applications may include, but are not limited to, mechanical vibrations, population dynamics, traffic flow, chemical kinetics, cell biology and geophysical fluid dynamics. Prerequisite: MATH 233 and MATH 250. Fall semester, alternate years.

MATH 315 Numerical Analysis
This course introduces algorithms for numerical solutions to mathematical problems, error analysis and computer packages. Topics include power series, roots of equations, linear and nonlinear systems, numerical differentiation and integration, differential equations, interpolation and difference equations, and curve fitting. Prerequisites: CSCI 110, MATH 233, and MATH 250 or instructor's consent. Spring semester, alternate years.

MATH 317 Operations Research
Topics include linear programming, duality, sensitivity analysis, transportation and assignment problems. The course also deals with computer implementation of selected algorithms. Selected topics from the following: game theory, network analysis, integer programming and decision theory. Prerequisite: MATH 233 and MATH 250. Fall semester, alternate years.

MATH 321 Probability and Statistics
Topics include probability, discrete and continuous random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, statistical inference and sample statistics, hypothesis testing and selection of procedures, and correlation and regression. Prerequisite: MATH 233 and MATH 250. Spring semester, alternate years.

MATH 350 Modern Geometry
Topics include postulational systems, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, and the role of geometry in the history of mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 250. Spring semester, alternate years.

MATH 355 Topology
Topics include metric spaces and general topological spaces, separation properties, compactness, connectedness, convergence, completeness, continuous functions, and homeomorphisms. Prerequisite: MATH 250. Offered by special arrangement with a member of the mathematics faculty.

MATH 373 Real Analysis
Topics include introduction to the theory of functions of a real variable, topology, limits, continuity, differentiability, the Riemann integral, sequences and series. Prerequisite: MATH 250. Spring semester.

MATH 376 Complex Analysis
Topics include elementary functions of a complex variable, differentiation, topology, integration, calculus of residues and series. Prerequisite: MATH 250. Fall semester, alternate years.

MATH 489 Special Topics
A course designed for the study of subject material of special interest. The organization, methodology and objectives of the course will be determined by the instructor. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and junior or senior standing.

MATH 490 Independent Study
A course which allows a talented student to pursue an area of study on an individual basis, with consultation and evaluation. The objectives, organization, methodology and means of evaluation will be mutually agreed upon by a faculty member and the student. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and junior or senior standing.

MATH 499 Senior Examination (0 credits)
This non-credit course consists of two, two-hour exams covering the various areas of mathematics in the undergraduate curriculum. One exam is a standardized national test, while the second exam is designed by the college’s mathematics discipline. The purpose of these exams is to assess whether graduates of the program are achieving the outcomes of the major program. The results of these exams will help the mathematics discipline monitor and improve the program. Prerequisite: senior standing. Spring semester.

Military Science

MILS 101 Leadership and Military Science 1 (2 credits)
An introductory course designed to orient students to the ROTC program and to familiarize students with the fundamentals of various military skills including tactical movement, weapon familiarization, land navigation, facing personal challenges, and understanding the competencies that are critical for effective leadership and communication. The curriculum emphasizes the personal development of life skills such as cultural understanding, goal setting, time management, stress management, and comprehensive fitness relate to leadership, officership, and the Army profession. The focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership dimensions, attributes and core leader competencies while gaining an understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student. Leadership students have an option to participate in combat water survival training, rappelling from a 60-foot tower, land navigation and field survival skills. Leadership laboratory required. Physical fitness session optional.

MILS 102 Leadership and Military Science 2 (2 credits)
Further development of leadership attributes required in accordance with the Army’s leadership requirements model and the orientation of the ROTC program. Curriculum focuses primarily on the competencies needed for effective execution of the profession of arms, communication skills, leadership traits and behaviors, and basic combat tactics. Students learn how Army ethics and values shape the Army and the specific ways that these ethics are inculcated into Army culture. Additionally, advanced land navigation skills and basic rifle marksmanship skills are taught. Leadership students have an option to participate in combat water survival training, rappelling from a 60-foot tower, land navigation, a leadership development exercise and field survival skills. Leadership laboratory required. Physical fitness session optional.

MILS 201 Basic Leadership and Management 1
A leadership and management course where the student is required to practice and apply the fundamentals of Army Leadership, Officership, Army Values and Ethics, Personal Development, and small unit tactics at the platoon level. Students are required to demonstrate writing skills and present information briefings as preparation for development in becoming a successful future officer.  The outcomes are demonstrated through Critical and Creative Thinking and the ability to apply Troop Leading Procedures.  Comprehension of the officer‘s role in Leading Change by applying Innovative Solutions to Problems in concert with the Principles of Mission Command.  The Army Profession is also stressed through leadership forum and a leadership self-assessment. Leadership students have the option to participate in Cadet Initial Entry Training at Fort Knox, KY, combat water survival training, rappelling from a 60-foot tower, land navigation and field survival skills. Leadership laboratory required. Physical fitness session optional.

MILS 202 Basic Leadership and Management 2
The objective of this course is to present instruction in and practical applications of the principles and techniques of leadership, personal development, officer skills, Army Values, ethics and management by identifying and illustrating effective leadership traits. Course provides an insight into the factors affecting behavior and an opportunity for application of leadership and management techniques through tactical leadership exercises at the small unit level. Students are required to demonstrate writing skills and present information briefings, operational orders and plans as preparation for development to become a successful future officer. Physical fitness session optional.

MILS 301 Advanced Leadership and Management 1
The objectives of this course are to stress the leadership role in directing and coordinating individual and military team efforts in the execution of unified land operations in concert with the principles and war fighting functions of mission command; to familiarize students with the roles of the various branches in the overall mission of the Army and their functions in support of forces; and to teach the principles of command and control, leadership techniques and communications systems used in the tactical employment of squads and platoons. Leadership laboratory required and includes a weekend leader development exercise. Prerequisite: completion of MILS 101 - MILS 202 or prior military service.

MILS 302 Advanced Leadership and Management 2
The objective of this course is to present instruction in and practical applications of the principles and techniques of Army Leadership, Officership, Army Values and Ethics, Personal Development and small unit tactics at the platoon level. Course provides capability for student to plan, coordinate, navigate, motivate and lead a squad and platoon in the execution of offensive, defensive and stability missions during a classroom practical exercise, a leadership laboratory, and a leader development exercise. Completion of this course prepares the student for the ROTC Cadet Leader Course, which the student attends in the summer at Fort Knox, KY. Prerequisite: MILS 301.

MILS 401 Applied Leadership and Management 1
The objectives of this course are to give an overview of Army organizational structure, to give an introduction to training management, application of mission command and the importance of comprehensive Soldier fitness. Course examines the process of officer evaluation reports, cultural awareness and property protection, rules of engagement, and the Army as a Profession of Arms. Leadership laboratory required and includes a weekend leader development exercise.

MILS 402 Applied Leadership and Management 2
The objectives of the course are to introduce students to the Army Operating Concept, enhance professional competence through the practical application of mission command, the execution of unified land operations, and the understanding of the operational environment to conduct a battle analysis. Course examines facets of platoon leadership to include sphere of influence, expectation management and toxic leadership to prepare the student to successfully lead a platoon in garrison and combat. Leadership laboratory required and includes a weekend leader development exercise.

Music

MUSI 012 Wind Ensemble (1 credit)
Wind ensemble is St. Norbert's top instrumental ensemble, open to majors and non-majors alike. The wind ensemble is dedicated to excellence in the performance of both traditional and contemporary wind and percussion literature. The group represents St. Norbert College through performances in a variety of venues each year. Principal ensemble. Prerequisite: audition. Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 014 Concert Band (1 credit)
Concert Band is open to all students, regardless of major, with no audition required. Typically consisting of non-music majors and music majors on secondary instruments, the atmosphere is designed for enjoyment while preparing fine literature to the best of the ensemble's ability. Principal ensemble. Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 015 Chamber Singers (1 credit)
Chamber Singers is a select ensemble of mixed voices, chosen each year by audition. The group is open to all students, regardless of major. Performing a wide variety of literature, from madrigals to major choral works, the chamber singers focus on technical precision with sensitive musical interpretation. Principal ensemble. Prerequisite: audition. Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 016 Opera Workshop (1 credit)
Participants in Opera Workshop study various genres of musical drama and vocal performance styles through staged presentations. Opera Workshop productions present scenes from, or full productions of, significant operatic works. During rehearsal, students are expected to be involved in all aspects of production, from the technical and directorial to actual performance. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent. Fall semester, repeatable.

MUSI 017 Concert Choir (1 credit)
The concert choir consists of two ensembles: the men’s choir and the women’s choir. These groups perform both as separate ensembles and combined as a large ensemble of mixed voices. Open to all students on campus with no audition required, these groups maintain a consistently high level of musicality and performance expertise. Participants in concert choir perform music of all styles and genres in a minimum of two on-campus concerts each semester. Principal ensemble. Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 018 Brass Ensemble (1 credit)
Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 019 Accompanying (1 credit)
Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 020 Vocal Jazz Workshop (1 credit)
Vocal jazz participants rehearse and perform vocal jazz literature from a variety of styles and eras. Emphasis is given to solo jazz singing technique and stylistic aspects of ensemble singing. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent. Spring semester, repeatable.

MUSI 021 Jazz Ensemble (1 credit)
The goal of jazz ensemble is the study and performance of jazz ensemble literature from a variety of styles and eras. All ensemble members are required to attend daily rehearsals, dress rehearsals and concerts. Smaller ensemble work is also offered through the jazz combo program and is organized based on instrumentation and student interest. All participants will work on the development of improvisational skills, effective musical style and teamwork. Prerequisite: audition. Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 022 Woodwind Ensemble (1 credit)
Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 023 Flute Choir (1 credit)
Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 024 Clarinet Choir (1 credit)
Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 027 Bell Choir (1 credit)
Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 028 Piano Ensemble (1 credit)
Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 051 / 061 Voice Lessons - Lower/Upper Division (1 or 2 credits)
The study of vocal production, literature and performance techniques consisting of one lesson per week and participation in a voice studio class. MUSI 061 culminates in a recital performance. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent. Co-requisite: ensemble participation. Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 052 / 062 Piano Lessons - Lower/Upper Division (1 or 2 credits)
Lower division lessons emphasize the development of technical facility and knowledge of various styles of keyboard literature. Upper division lessons will concentrate on the preparation of specific selections for performance. For keyboard and piano pedagogy majors, MUSI 062 will culminate in a recital performance. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent. Co-requisite: ensemble participation. Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 053 / 063 Brass Lessons - Lower/Upper Division (1 or 2 credits)
One lesson per week on a brass instrument and participation in an instrumental studio class. Lesson material is designed to give students a solid foundation in the areas of performance, literature and pedagogy. MUSI 063 culminates in a recital. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent. Co-requisite: ensemble participation. Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 054 / 064 Woodwind Lessons - Lower/Upper Division (1 or 2 credits)
One lesson per week on a woodwind instrument and participation in an instrumental studio class. Lesson material is designed to give students a solid foundation in the areas of performance, literature and pedagogy. MUSI 064 culminates in a recital. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent. Co-requisite: ensemble participation. Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 055 / 065 Organ Lessons - Lower/Upper Division (1 or 2 credits)
One lesson per week on the organ. Lesson material is designed to give students a solid foundation in the areas of performance, literature and pedagogy. MUSI 065 culminates in a recital performance. Ensemble participation required. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent. Co-requisite: ensemble participation. Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 057 / 067 Composition Lessons - Lower/Upper Division (1 or 2 credits)
One lesson per week of private composition and participation in a composition studio class. MUSIC 067 culminates in a recital performance of original works. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent. Co-requisite: ensemble participation. Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 058 / 068 Percussion Lessons - Lower/Upper Division (1 or 2 credits)
One lesson per week on percussion instruments and participation in an instrumental studio class. Lesson material is designed to give students a solid foundation in the areas of performance, literature and pedagogy. MUSI 068 culminates in a recital performance. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent. Co-requisite: ensemble participation. Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 059 / 069 String Bass Lessons - Lower/Upper Division (1 or 2 credits)
One lesson per week on string bass and participation in an instrumental studio class. Lesson material is designed to give students a solid foundation in the areas of performance, literature and pedagogy. MUSI 069 culminates in a recital performance. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent. Co-requisite: ensemble participation. Every semester, repeatable.

MUSI 101 Group Piano (2 credits; no audit)
This course emphasizes basic sight-reading skills, scales, chords and repertoire of elementary pieces for the piano. Included in the course are basic concepts of music theory. The course is open to all students with no prerequisite or ensemble participation required.

MUSI 102 Group Voice (2 credits; no audit)
This course emphasizes basic vocal production, performance technique and repertoire for the voice. Included in the course are basic concepts of music theory. The course is open to all students with no prerequisite or ensemble participation required.

MUSI 145 Introduction to Composition (2 credits; no audit)
This course is intended to foster and develop the individual’s unique musical vocabulary across a variety of genres while exposing students to basic techniques used in music composition including notation, engraving, instrumentation, arranging, improvisation and composition. Through practical guidance in the composition of original music and the exploration of a variety of compositional paradigms across multiple centuries, students will use current technology to arrange and create original works. Spring semester, even-numbered years.

MUSI 150 Survey of World Musics (Core: EI)
This course provides a basic introduction of world music methods and problems, and surveys several non-Western musical cultures including the cultures of Africa, the Middle East, Japan, Southeastern Europe, Latin America, India and Native American. Students will listen to and analyze representative works, and do independent research on a pertinent topic. Fall semester.

MUSI 167 Comprehensive Musicianship 1
This is the first of a sequence of courses in which students will learn the elements of music and standard notation, aural and score analysis of compositions, and style characteristics within their musical and historical contexts, and the development of composition, appreciation and interpretive skills. Basic music theory skills emphasized. Ear training, sight singing, computer skills and keyboard labs are included. Fall semester.

MUSI 168 Comprehensive Musicianship 2
This course emphasizes part writing, and harmonic and formal analysis of Western music from ancient times through the Renaissance. Ear training, sight singing, computer skills and keyboard labs are included. Prerequisite: MUSI 167 or instructor’s consent. Spring semester.

MUSI 176 Music Appreciation (Core: EI)
Designed for minors and non-majors, this course is concerned with the art of intelligent and perceptive music listening for those interested in increasing their knowledge and enjoyment of music. The course traces the development of music up to the present day. Various media are employed. Spring semester. Note: Course not open to Music majors.

MUSI / AMER 184 History of American Popular Music (Core: WT)
The course will cover the history of popular music in the United States from the late 19th-century to the present day. Genres discussed include modern styles such as rock, R & B, hip-hop, folk, country, jazz, ragtime, blues, and early musical theater. A chronological study of popular styles will expose students to important songwriters and performers and show how their music was influenced by elements like racial prejudice, political events and social structures. Modern technological influences (radio, recording media, television, computers) will also be explored. Fall semester.

MUSI 246 Vocal Diction (2 credits)
This course introduces students to the International Phonetic Alphabet for learning pronunciation of English, Italian, German and French song texts. Students will recite and sing songs in foreign languages with attention to translation, pronunciation, accent and inflection. Prerequisite: freshman or sophomore standing or instructor’s consent. Fall semester.

MUSI 267 Comprehensive Musicianship 3
The study of Western music of the Baroque era, including theoretical and formal analysis, stylistic development of compositional genres, and significant works examined in historical context. Ear training, sight singing, computer skills and keyboard labs are included. Prerequisite: MUSI 168 or instructor’s consent. Fall semester.

MUSI 268 Comprehensive Musicianship 4
The study of Western music of the Classic Era, including theoretical and formal analysis, stylistic characteristics and significant works examined in their historical context. Ear training, sight singing, computer skills and keyboard skills are included. Prerequisite: MUSI 267 or instructor’s consent. Spring semester.

MUSI 289 Special Topics (2 credits)
This course offered whenever a mutual interest in a more specialized topic in music exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent.

MUSI 290 Independent Study (2 credits)
Individual study of an approved topic in music under the supervision of a music faculty member. This course permits faculty and students to explore together a subject of special or personal interest. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent.

MUSI 315 Introduction to Opera (Adv. Core: WT)
This course is designed to meet the needs and interests of the general student rather than the music major. The course will view selected operas on videotape and study the development of opera from Monteverdi to the present, exploring the opera as a social and cultural phenomenon and as an expression of national musical styles. The course attempts to make the student aware not only of the history of opera in its many forms, but also to appreciate the extent to which modern music, including popular musical drama, is indebted to the success and popularity of opera. Note: Course not open to Music majors.

MUSI / AMER 318 Evolution of Jazz (Adv. Core: DD)
The study of jazz from its origins in New Orleans to the present day. The course focuses on important performers and songwriters, types of literature, an appreciation of jazz improvisation, as well as the interaction of social, political, and economic elements that strongly influenced the genre. Audio and video presentations will be used extensively. Spring semester.

MUSI 321 Piano Pedagogy 1 (2 credits)
Piano pedagogy explores the various theories of teaching the piano and technical analysis of the playing mechanism. Teaching methods and procedures are developed for establishing efficient practice and working with individual learning styles. Students will survey and evaluate teaching materials and learn to analyze the technical requirements of keyboard music. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent. Fall semester.

MUSI 322 Piano Pedagogy 2 (2 credits)
This course is designed to give students experience in the practical application of piano-teaching skills and concepts of the mechanism. Prerequisites: MUSI 321 and instructor’s consent. Spring semester.

MUSI 329 Piano Literature (2 credits)
This course is designed to provide the piano major with an understanding of significant forms in the history of piano music, the important compositions within these genres, and a functional and practical literature library of compositions for use in a variety of settings. Spring semester.

MUSI 345 Vocal Literature (2 credits)
This course is designed to provide the vocal major with an understanding of significant forms in the history of vocal music, the important compositions within these genres, and a functional and practical literature library of compositions for use in a variety of settings. Fall semester, odd-numbered years.

MUSI 347 Choral Repertoire (2 credits)
This course is designed to provide the emerging choral conductor with an understanding of significant forms in the history of choral music, the compositions that hold preeminence within those genres, and a functional and practical repertoire library of compositions for use in a variety of settings. Prerequisite: junior standing.

MUSI 349 Vocal Pedagogy (2 credits)
This course is designed to provide singers with an understanding of the anatomy, physiology, and physics of singing and song production. As part of this course, students will teach voice lessons under the supervision of the instructor. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing and instructor’s consent. Spring semester, even-numbered years.

MUSI 362 Woodwind Methods (2 credits)
Basic principles of teaching and performing on woodwind instruments. Fall semester, odd-numbered years.

MUSI 363 String Methods (2 credits)
Basic principles of teaching and performing on string instruments. Fall semester, even-numbered years.

MUSI 365 Brass Methods (2 credits)
Basic principles of teaching and performing on brass instruments. Spring semester, alternate years.

MUSI 366 Percussion Methods (2 credits)
Basic principles of teaching and performing on percussion instruments. Spring semester, even-numbered years.

MUSI 367 Comprehensive Musicianship 5
Romantic and Nationalistic music will be examined through the study of significant composers and their compositions. Emphasis is given to chromaticism, advanced harmonic analysis and extended forms within the historical context of the era. Keyboard labs are included. Prerequisite: MUSI 268 or instructor’s consent. Fall semester.

MUSI 368 Comprehensive Musicianship 6
The concluding course of the sequence, Comprehensive Musicianship 6 examines significant works from Impressionism through the musical experiments of the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will compose, write about music and learn advanced analytical techniques. Prerequisite: MUSI 367. Spring semester.

MUSI 370 Introduction to Jazz Improvisation (2 credits)
This course will introduce students to jazz improvisation, or the spontaneous composition through the study of great soloists and their transcriptions. Emphasis is placed on common scales, modes and harmonic progressions. Mastering this skill requires intense practice and a deep knowledge of style, form and jazz harmony. Students will be expected to perform in the classroom setting.

MUSI 381 Introduction to Conducting (2 credits)
Baton techniques and conducting problems utilizing a cross section of instrumental and choral music from all periods. Students practice with live performers and are videotaped. Required of all music majors and minors. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or instructor’s consent. Spring semester.

MUSI 382 Advanced Choral Conducting (2 credits)
A continuation of Introduction to Conducting, with advanced study in choral conducting, technique, score reading and rehearsal techniques. Prerequisite: MUSI 381. Fall semester.

MUSI 383 Advanced Instrumental Conducting (2 credits)
A continuation of Introduction to Conducting, with advanced study in instrumental conducting technique, score reading and rehearsal techniques. Members of the class will form a small ensemble to provide laboratory rehearsal experience. Prerequisite: MUSI 381. Fall semester.

MUSI 384 Orchestration (2 credits)
A study of the instruments of the concert band and orchestra, their tonal characteristics and transpositions. Assignments involve scoring for orchestra, concert band and various small ensembles. Coursework includes score analysis, listening and computer generation of assignments. Prerequisite: junior standing or instructor’s consent. Spring semester, odd-numbered years.

MUSI 389 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
This course offered whenever a mutual interest in a more specialized topic in music exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent.

MUSI 420 Merit Recital
A full recital with research paper for exceptional students in performance. Contingent upon completion of junior and senior recitals. Results in an automatic waiver of the eighth applied half-course during that semester. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent.

MUSI 489 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
A course offered whenever a mutual interest in a more specialized topic in music exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent.

MUSI 490 Independent Study
Individual study of an approved topic in music under the supervision of a Music faculty member. This course permits faculty and students to explore together a subject of special or personal interest. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent and approval of the associate dean of visual and performing arts.

Natural Sciences

NSCI 104 Great People of Science
The development of scientific thought from the early Greek period to modern times will be covered. The primary emphasis will be on scientists as people, analysis of their contributions, and the significance of these in the development of scientific theories. Scientists such as Galileo, Newton, Einstein and Darwin will be discussed. Infrequently offered.

NSCI 310 Global Viral Pandemics (Core: BB)
Our understanding of viral diseases extends beyond the physical effects they have on an individual. For example, viruses may influence governmental policies and create social stigmas that have long-term consequences. This discussion-based course will explore through literature and first-hand accounts how social, political, cultural, gender, and scientific views influence global healthcare and a global understanding of viral pathogens. The AIDS pandemic and Ebola epidemic will be the focus of this offering.

NSCI 348 Bioterrorism (Core: BB)
This course will investigate the methods of development of biological weapons and the mechanisms of their use against military or civilian populations. Biological weapons are defined as those viral and bacterial pathogens of humans that induce illness in the affected individual and also those biological agents that can damage or destroy the food and water supply of a population. Protection against such attacks will be discussed. The effects on society as a whole and the responses of society to the threat of bioterrorist attacks will be emphasized. This course has a laboratory component in addition to a lecture format. In the laboratory, the principles of epidemiological spread of disease agents will be investigated by the use of simulations and the mechanisms of disease prevention will be addressed experimentally.

NSCI 354 Natural History Field Studies
This course involves an extended inter-semester field trip to study the natural history and culture of an area (generally the neotropics). Students are required to attend regular classes before and after the trip. A research project and field book constitute the major course requirements.

NSCI 358 Social Impacts of Infectious Disease (Adv. Core: PN)
This course focuses on the social and historical importance of infectious disease. The course will center around three main ideas: a summary of significant diseases in human history, a detailed analysis of the particular outbreak in history, and a detailed account of an emerging outbreak of infectious disease. Basic information regarding microorganisms and the human immune system will be included. A laboratory component will allow students to observe and handle non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi and conduct basic experiments in disease transmission.

Peace and Justice

PEAC 200 Introduction to Peace and Justice
Violent conflict remains one of the most serious problems in the world today. Hundreds of thousands of people die every year as a result of war, and millions of refugees are displaced and suffering. The interdisciplinary academic field of peace studies attempts to understand the causes of such conflict and contribute to sustainable strategies that will lead not just to the absence of war, but to genuine human flourishing. This course will introduce that field of study with a particular emphasis on conflict transformation, peace building, and the rights of marginalized persons. These emphases reflect our Norbertine heritage and the ordering themes of the Peace and Justice minor at St. Norbert College.

PEAC 266 Human Rights and Responsibilities (Core: WT)
This course will articulate an interdisciplinary (philosophical, historical, and religious) rationale for universal human rights and human dignity while highlighting the history of the human rights tradition and the contribution of Catholic social teaching. Conversely, it will examine the rhetoric and dynamic of genocide and apartheid, exploring the way forward with realistic strategies that emphasize human connectedness and responsibility.

PEAC / POLI 352 Conceptions of Human Rights (Adv. Core: BB)
This course critically reviews and analyzes the meaning, definitions, history and development of human rights in world politics. It approaches the subject matter both from a political science and law perspective, which see human rights as ascribed rights that come from birth, and from a sociological perspective which takes into account the power relationships that are built into the understandings and differential usage of the concept of human rights. While the legal and political theory has a lot of explanatory power in terms of tracing the evolutionary trajectory of international human rights law after World War II, sociology accounts for the cultural, societal and historical context in which the discussion of human rights arises. In this framework, the course looks at alternative views regarding the definitions, history and development of human rights in the Western and non-Western contexts.

PEAC 400 Capstone in Peace and Justice
PEAC 400 is the capstone course for the Peace and Justice minor at St. Norbert College. In this seminar, students will deepen their knowledge of peace and justice through reading, active discussion, and in-depth research. In discussion and written work, students will be challenged to integrate knowledge accumulated throughout the minor (i.e., from coursework, service, and community engagement).

Philosophy

PHIL 105 Critical Thinking
This course is designed to help students develop and sharpen valuable cognitive and analytical skills in order to think more critically about claims and the kinds of evidence and argumentation offered in their support. The course focuses on developing habits of reasonableness and objectivity, identifying fallacies, writing argumentatively, and analyzing inductive and deductive arguments. Special attention will be paid to analogical, legal and scientific reasoning. Designed for non-majors.

PHIL 120 Philosophical Foundations in the Study of Human Nature (Core: PF)
This course provides a thematic and historical introduction to basic philosophical issues regarding human nature utilizing primary texts from established figures in the philosophical tradition. Topics include the moral dimension of human experience, the fundamental nature of the world, the nature of truth and knowledge, and justice. Readings include dialogues of Plato, authors from at least three of the four philosophical epochs (ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary), and at least one author from the Christian philosophical tradition. Emphasis will be placed on methods of logical inquiry including Socratic dialectic, deductive and inductive inference, and other forms of philosophical discourse with the goal of developing the student’s skills in written and oral communication.

PHIL / CLAS 207 Greek Philosophy
A study of the ancient Greek thinkers who initiated Western philosophy. The course begins with the pre-Socratic philosophers and then focuses on Plato and Aristotle. Fall semester.

PHIL / CLAS 209 Hellenistic Philosophy
The course introduces students to the three major schools of Hellenistic philosophy that dominated Greek thought after Aristotle (Skepticism, Stoicism and Epicureanism) and their respective attempts to refine or reject the classical conception of the good life. Students explore principally the ethical implications of the Hellenistic movements, though certain issues in metaphysics and epistemology are covered as well.

PHIL 210 Logic
A study of the principles of correct reasoning. The course covers informal fallacies and the fundamentals of symbolic logic, including quantification theory. Spring semester.

PHIL 213 Medieval Philosophy
A study of the philosophers of the medieval period (approximately 350 C.E. to 1350), with emphasis on Augustine, Anselm and Thomas Aquinas. Themes covered include the relation of faith and reason, existence of God, the problem of evil, the nature of the soul, and ethics. Spring semester.

PHIL 235 Skepticism, Knowledge and Faith (Core: WT)
A historical survey of texts by prominent authors in the Western tradition concerning the nature, conditions and types of human knowledge. Topics may include arguments for the existence of God; foundations of empirical science; psychological belief states as distinct from religious faith; skepticism in both epistemic and religious contexts; and the nature of reason and rational inquiry. Prerequisite: PHIL 120. Alternate years.

PHIL 242 Blaming and Forgiving (Core: WT)
We will critically reflect on some common assumptions of blame and interpersonal forgiveness and begin addressing puzzles that arise from these assumptions. Questions taken up will include: what kinds of psychological and social incapacities exempt us from deserving blame or praise for what we do? Does it matter what kinds of motives we have when we act wrongly or rightly? How can we take seriously the fact that someone treated us wrongly and still come to forgive them? We will use both historical and contemporary texts to guide our study. Prerequisite: PHIL 120. Spring semester.

PHIL 245 Business Ethics
A study of the ethical issues that confront contemporary businesses. The course will begin by introducing the major positions in Western ethical theory and by considering the moral status and the purpose of corporations. Through the use of case studies, the course will go on to explore a number of particular issues which may include (but is not limited to) whistle blowing, surveillance/screening of employees, preferential hiring, the ethics of advertising, ethical accounting practices, globalization, outsourcing, sweatshop labor, and environmental pollution and resource depletion. Fall semester, alternate years.

PHIL 250 / THRS 255 Philosophy of Religion (Core: WT)
A study providing a rational assessment of religious beliefs and concepts and of arguments used in their support. The course considers contemporary challenges to the belief in God and the responses to these challenges. Fall semester, alternate years.

PHIL / THRS 265 Asian Philosophy and Religion (Core: BB)
A study of the major philosophical and religious traditions of South and East Asia. The course emphasizes the Hindu and Buddhist traditions. The ethical, metaphysical, and epistemological aspects of each major tradition are covered. Fall semester.

PHIL 275 Bioethics
A study of ethical issues associated with health and medicine. The course will begin with an overview of major positions in ethical theory and of fundamental concepts and principles in medical ethics. Issues may include, but are not limited to, the relation between health care providers and patients, human reproduction, conflicting definitions of mental illness, the use of biotechnology for human enhancement, balancing individual liberty with public health, withholding and withdrawing of life-sustaining treatment, research ethics, and social justice and health policy. Catholic teachings on some of these issues will be considered. Spring semester.

PHIL 282 Law, Morality and Punishment
Do we have a moral obligation to obey the law? Are unjust laws still laws? Does self-defense make any sense as a legal excuse? Students will investigate the validity and authority of legal systems with special attention to the historical evolution of key concepts within the Western philosophical tradition. Topics include the relation of law to morality, the conditions of responsibility and the justification of punishment.  Prerequisite: PHIL 120.

PHIL 300 Modern Philosophy
A study of the major movements and figures in European philosophy from the 16th to the 19th century. The focus of the course is the rise of skepticism in relation to developments in science and religion, the study of the nature of the mind, and the knowing process and claims about the nature and existence of the self, of the external world and of God. A number of thinkers and philosophers will be surveyed with principal emphasis on Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant. Prerequisite: PHIL 207 or PHIL 210 or PHIL 213. Fall semester.

PHIL / AMER  305 American Philosophy (Adv. Core: WT)
A study of the major movements and figures in American philosophy and intellectual history. The course will examine the diverse philosophical themes in the American tradition, including idealism, 18th century political theory, transcendentalism and pragmatism. Figures studied include Edwards, Adams, Jefferson, Emerson, Thoreau, James and Dewey. Spring semester.

PHIL 310 Existentialist Thought (Adv. Core: WT)
A study of the development of European existentialism in the 19th and 20th centuries. The focus of the course is the meaning of human life and the nature of human values. It involves a study of existentialist conceptions of the human person and, in particular, views of human freedom and creativity, the role of the irrational in human life, the role of commitment and choice in human belief, judgment, action, and the relation of the essence and existence of the person. Principal figures studied are Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre and Camus.

PHIL 311 Food Ethics
Eating is among the most primal of human activities. Yet the question of what we should eat becomes increasingly complicated as we learn more about the effects of our choices on animals, the environment, our communities and ourselves. When, if ever, is it ethical to eat animals? Should we eat locally or should we take a more cosmopolitan approach? Can mindful eating contribute to a more just world? What is a healthy body? The course will culminate with a final project that analyzes our food practices from several ethical frameworks, informed by scientific, humanistic, and economic perspectives. Designed for non-philosophy majors. Prerequisite: PHIL 120.

PHIL / CLAS / POLI 314 Classical and Medieval Political Thought
An examination of the political theories of major ancient and medieval thinkers, with primary emphasis on the writings of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas. Students will investigate issues such as the origin, nature, and purpose of political societies, the types of political constitutions, the concepts of rulership and authority, the meaning of citizenship, and the relation of the individual to society. Fall semester, alternate years.

PHIL 315 Ethics
A study of four major ethical theories in Western philosophy and of their application to several contemporary ethical issues. The theories are those of Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill. Issues examined may include, but are not limited to, euthanasia, abortion, capital punishment, free speech, just war, treatment of animals and the environment. Fall semester.

PHIL / POLI 316 Modern Political Thought
An examination of the political theories of major thinkers of the modern period (16th to 19th centuries), with primary emphasis given to the writings of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hegel and Marx. Students will investigate such issues as the origin and purpose of political societies, the nature of political power, and the concepts of social contract, authority and sovereignty, law, liberty, and revolution. Fall semester, alternate years.

PHIL 322 Aquinas’ Philosophy and Theology (Adv. Core: CI)
A critical study of the philosophical theology of St. Thomas Aquinas. Topics covered may include the existence and nature of God; the efficacy of religious language; the origin, order, and purpose of created beings; the interplay between intellect and will in human actions; the relationship between virtue and the good life for human beings; the species of vice and their causes; and the metaphysical accounts of Christian doctrines such as the Trinity, Incarnation, and Eucharist. Fall semester, alternate years.

PHIL 330 The European Enlightenment (Adv. Core: WT)
An overview of the history of ideas in the Western tradition, covering the period from 1688 to 1789, principally in France and Britain, with consideration given to the influence of the Enlightenment on the American founding. The central theme of the course is the emergence and rapid development of natural science, its growing influence on all departments of human knowledge and its confrontation with the religious traditions of the time. Representative writers include Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Helvetius, Mandeville and Adam Smith. Fall semester.

PHIL 3331 & 3332 Food Ethics: The Philippines – For Honors Program Students (2+2 credits, Adv. Core: BB)
How can we eat ethically? The inseparability of food consumption from complex modes of production makes this a difficult question to answer. We will examine three philosophical conflicts in food ethics: the Industrial vs. the Agrarian, the Modern vs. the Traditional, and the Cosmopolitan vs. the Local. In the Philippines, we will be visiting markets, farms, restaurants, and agricultural research centers to see how these conflicts can be navigated in a diverse and dynamic society. Fall semester 2 credits and January term 2 credits, alternate years. Core credit awarded when both course components are completed.

PHIL / CLAS 334 Tragedy and Philosophy (Adv. Core: EI)
A study of tragedy as a dramatic and literary form and the different Western philosophical theories of tragedy inspired by that art form. One half of the course will concentrate on Greek tragedy (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides) and its commentators, both ancient (Plato and Aristotle) and modern. The second half will examine both Renaissance and modern examples of the tragic tradition with contemporary philosophical readings on the significance of that tradition. Spring semester, alternate years.

PHIL / MUSI 336 Mozart, Metallica and Metaphysics
The course will introduce students to fundamental problems and puzzles in the philosophy of music as well as engage students in musical experiences that provoke philosophical questions. Students will be exposed to music that challenges the presuppositions inherent in conventional American cultural expectations and the Western approach to musical experience more broadly. It will start by exploring the genesis of these questions in ancient Greek philosophy and culture and trace them through their reemergence in the Enlightenment, modern, and post-modern eras. Prerequisite: PHIL 120. Summer sessions, alternate years.

PHIL 365 Twentieth-Century Philosophy
A survey of the main philosophical movements of the 20th century, the course will cover leading figures in pragmatism, phenomenology, analytic philosophy and the Continental tradition. Representative authors may include James, Dewey, Husserl, Wittgenstein, Quine, Heidegger, Rorty and Foucault. Prerequisite: PHIL 210 or PHIL 300. Spring semester, alternate years.

PHIL 370 The Analytic Tradition
An historical survey of the main developments and leading figures in the Anglo-American analytic tradition. The primary focus is on the application of new methods of logic and linguistic analysis to the perennial problems of metaphysics and epistemology. Figures studied include Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Ayer, Carnap, Ryle, Quine and Kripke. Prerequisite: PHIL 210 or PHIL 300. Spring semester, alternate years.

PHIL 389 Special Topics
A study of a single philosophical topic of special interest to students. When the course is offered, the topic will be listed in the timetable of courses.

PHIL 490 Independent Study
A course allowing staff and students to explore together philosophical topics of special interest. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent and approval by associate dean of Humanities.

Physical Education
All PHED courses are offered with a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading format.

PHED 035 Adult and Child CPR / Standard First Aid (2 credits)
This course features hands-on simulation, lectures, as well as live and video demonstration. Participants learn to call and work with EMS, care for conscious and unconscious choking victims, perform CPR, and care for breathing and cardiac emergencies in adults, children and infants. Includes basic care for injuries or sudden illness until advanced medical care can take over (basic disease transmission precaution, recognizing and caring for bleeding, wounds, burns, heat and cold emergencies; immobilizing muscle, bone and joint injuries; care for shock, bites and poisoning). Meets OSHA guidelines for first aid. The completion of course includes certification through the American Red Cross.

PHED 036 Jump Stretch Flexibility/Conditioning (2 credits)
This course will cover a different type of training regimen to develop an increased level of flexibility as well as improved power and explosion. Each student will perform at a level relative to their ability and gain an appreciation for lifelong fitness.

PHED 038 Ki Aikido (2 credits)
This course will introduce students to the principles and techniques of the dynamic, peaceful martial art of Ki Aikido. 

PHED 037 Curling (2 credits)
This course will give students the basic skills and knowledge of curling. Content will include history, terminology, equipment, team composition and learning of the fundamentals. 

PHED 038 Ki Aikido (2 credits)
This course will introduce students to the principles and techniques of the dynamic, peaceful martial art of Ki Aikido.

PHED 039 Conditioning and Training for Road Races (2 credits)
Learning the fundamental principles required to successfully train for a 3K, 5K, 10K, half-marathon and marathon are the fundamental topics in this course. Aerobic and anaerobic training will be conducted through track workouts and longer road runs. The goal of this course is to gain an understanding of different training programs, why they are used, and how to develop and personalize an individual plan for different road races.

PHED 041 Badminton (2 credits)
This course teaches students the basic skills and knowledge of badminton. Content will include learning basic skills such as serves, clears, drives, the drop shot, the smash, net shots, rules and strategy for doubles and singles, terminology, and an understanding of the history of the sport.

PHED 043 Bowling (2 credits, $30 fee)
This course will give students the basic skills and knowledge of bowling. Content will include history, terminology, equipment, approaches, releases, aiming and starting positions.

PHED 044 Recreational Ice Skating (2 credits, $35 fee)
This course is designed for students interested in learning the proper techniques and methods involved with ice skating. The class will emphasize both forward and backwards skating and will cover all other aspects involved with ice skating. This class is open to all levels of ice skaters.

PHED 045 Team Sports (2 credits)
This course will give students an opportunity to participate in and enjoy the recreational play of team sports. Emphasis will be on basic skills, knowledge of rules and strategies necessary for participation in the activities.

PHED 048 Golf (2 credits, $25 fee)
This course will provide students with the basic knowledge, skills and attitudes of golf. It will include fundamental skills such as grip, stance, swing, putting, and rules and etiquette.

PHED 052 Recreational Swimming (2 credits)
This class provides the opportunity for students to become safe and comfortable in the water. Students will develop swimming skills on their front and back. Instruction will emphasize freestyle and backstroke as well as water safety. Each student will progress toward becoming an endurance swimmer for enhanced fitness.

PHED 057 Volleyball (2 credits)
This course teaches students the basic skills and knowledge of volleyball. Content will include warm-ups, rules, terminology, serve/ receive information, basic offenses and defenses, spiking coverage and basic skills — serving, forearm pass, setting, blocking, spiking, dives and digs.

PHED 060 Beginning Weight Training for Men (2 credits)
An introduction to the fundamentals, techniques, safety concerns, and surveys of programs and concepts of weight training.

PHED 061 Beginning Weight Training for Women (2 credits)
An introduction to the fundamentals, techniques, safety concerns and surveys of programs and concepts of weight training.

PHED 062 Advanced Weight Training (2 credits)
This course provides the opportunity for students to investigate and experience advanced resistance-training techniques and principles. Prerequisite: PHED 060 / PHED 061 or instructor’s consent.

PHED 075 Organization and Administration of Athletic Programs (2 credits)
This course is designed to provide students with administrative techniques and procedures in the administration of athletic programs with a concentration on the collegiate field. Emphasis on theories and philosophies of administration, policies and practices, leadership, management, budgeting, planning, facilities and legal liabilities.

PHED 101 Concepts of Healthful Living (2 credits)
This course will provide students with knowledge of the concepts of wellness and will show them how they can apply this information to maintain and/or improve their own lifestyles. Knowledge of health-related topics such as nutrition, health legislation, health consumerism, interpersonal communication skills and assertiveness will be presented through lectures. Small group discussions will further investigate these topics and outline how students can apply this information to their lifestyles. Fitness topics such as physiology of the body at rest and during exercise, types of exercise programs, and methods of establishing a personal exercise program will be presented through testing, demonstrations and participation in weekly lab sessions.

PHED 105 Personal Conditioning (2 credits)
Personal Conditioning is an evidence-based, goal setting system to plan and achieve life, health and fitness goals for enhanced energy and well-being. Its purpose is to help students create a system to motivate and inspire themselves to live in great health and well-being for a lifetime. Students will identify their current condition and develop a program based on life vision and goals – setting standards for personal health and fitness, tracking the program, and learning strategies to achieve life goals by successfully dealing with obstacles.

Physics

PHYS 100 Physics in the Arts (Core: PN)
This course will examine the underlying physics involved in photography and music. Main topics will include waves, reflection and refraction, lenses, the eye, oscillations and resonance, the ear, and musical instruments. Lectures and one laboratory period per week. Basic algebra and geometry knowledge will be assumed.

PHYS 101 Concepts of Physics
An introduction to selected concepts and theories of physics, presenting their origin in connection with specific persons and events and their development into their present forms. Topics include the Copernican revolution, Newtonian dynamics, electromagnetic theory, the theory of relativity, and the quantum theory of microscopic matter. Emphasis will be given to concepts that have broad applications to phenomena of common experience. Presentation is by lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory experiments. No mathematical background beyond high school algebra will be assumed. Student who have received credit for PHYS 111 or PHYS 121 may not take PHYS 101 for credit without registrar’s consent. Infrequently offered.

PHYS 111 Fundamentals of Physics 1 (Core: PN)
An introductory course that presents students with the fundamental concepts of physics. This algebra-based course assumes no previous physics experience and will include the study of kinematics (including vectors), Newton’s laws, mechanical energy, rotational motion and waves. Consists of lectures and one laboratory period per week. Working knowledge of basic trigonometry and advanced high school algebra will be assumed. Fall semester.

PHYS 112 Fundamentals of Physics 2
Continuation of PHYS 111, completing a full-year introductory sequence on the fundamental concepts of physics. Topics include thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and introduction to modern physics, including quantum concepts and radioactivity. Lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 111. Spring semester.

PHYS 121 General Physics 1 (Core: PN)
Intended mainly for Physical Science majors, this introductory course presents a unified view of the fundamental principles of physics. Conceptual development and problem-solving skills are emphasized. Topics include vectors, kinematics, Newtonian dynamics, the conservation laws, oscillatory motion and waves. Lectures and one laboratory period per week. A working knowledge of trigonometry and completion of advanced high school algebra will be assumed. Co-requisite: MATH 131 or equivalent. Fall semester.

PHYS 122 General Physics 2
Continuation of PHYS 121, completing a full-year introductory sequence. Topics include thermodynamics, electric and magnetic fields and their interaction with matter, electro-magnetic waves, physical and geometrical optics, and radioactivity. Lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 121 and MATH 131. Spring semester.

PHYS 141 Astronomy (Core: PN)
This course is designed to provide a survey of astronomy with emphasis on the underlying physical principles. Students will learn about the scientific method and developments that have enabled our current understanding of the dynamic universe. Main topics include the cycles of the sky, the history of astronomy, the stars, the Milky Way galaxy and the solar system. Group projects will cover additional topics such as galaxies, cosmology and details of the solar system planets. Laboratories with hands-on activities will be an important component of the course. Some lab periods will meet in the evening for astronomical observations. No mathematical background beyond basic high school algebra will be assumed.

PHYS 211 Classical Mechanics
An intermediate treatment of Newtonian mechanics. Topics include equations of motion and their solutions, conservation laws, systems of particles, central force motion, and an introduction to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics. Lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: PHYS 122 and MATH 132. Fall semester, alternate years.

PHYS 225 Electronics
An introductory course in circuit analysis, including DC and AC circuits, semiconductor devices, and digital logic circuits. Lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: PHYS 122 and MATH 132. Fall semester, alternate years.

PHYS 241 Modern Physics
A survey of the essential experimental and theoretical development of 20th-century physics. Topics include special relativity, wave- particle duality, Bohr atom, basic quantum mechanics, radioactivity, nuclear reactions and particle physics. Lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: PHYS 122 and MATH 132. Fall semester, alternate years.

PHYS 250 Advanced Laboratory
An advanced course in experimental design and analysis intended to replicate the activities of a professional research project through the precision measurement of several of the fundamental physical contacts of the universe. Additional topics will include the calculation of statistical and systematic uncertainties, computer-based modeling and analysis, written and oral presentation of results, and research ethics. Prerequisites: PHYS 121 and PHYS 122. Spring semester, alternate years.

PHYS 311 Thermal Physics
An intermediate treatment of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics from a modern point of view. Topics include temperature, heat, entropy, irreversible processes, the general laws of thermodynamics, canonical distribution, equipartition theorem, the ideal gas law and an introduction to quantum statistics. Co-requisite: PHYS 241. Fall semester, alternate years.

PHYS 321 Electricity and Magnetism
A study of the classical electromagnetic theory. Topics include electrostatics, magnetostatics and an introduction to electrodynamics. Vector calculus will be introduced and extensively used. Prerequisites: PHYS 122 and MATH 233. Spring semester, alternate years.

PHYS 352 Optical and Atomic Physics
An introduction to the current fields of Optical and Atomic Physics. The foundations of modern optics will be laid, including the electromagnetic and quantum mechanical theory of light, geometric and wave optics, instrumentation, polarization, lasers, and modern optical components. The interaction of light with atoms will be introduced, including the fundamentals of atomic structure and numerous applications. Prerequisite: PHYS 241. Co-requisite: MATH 310. Spring semester, alternate years.  

PHYS 411 Quantum Mechanics
An advanced treatment of the principles and methods of quantum mechanics. Topics include the Schroedinger equation, the harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, quantum statistics, and applications to atomic and nuclear physics. The operator method will be introduced and used. Prerequisite: PHYS 241. Co-requisite: MATH 310. Spring semester, alternate years.

PHYS 489 Special Topics
Designed for the study of subject material of special interest. The organization, methodology and objectives will be determined by the instructor. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing and instructor’s consent.

PHYS 490 Independent Study (2 or 4 credits)
This course is designed to allow students to pursue, on an individual basis, an area of study such as solid state physics or astrophysics. The methodology and objectives will be mutually agreed upon by a faculty member and the student. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, prior consultation with and consent of the instructor and approval of the associate dean of natural sciences.

PHYS 492 Independent Research (2 or 4 credits)
An independent study course involving laboratory research carried out under the direction of a faculty member in physics or astrophysics. The methodology and objective will be mutually agreed upon by a faculty member and the student. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, prior consultation with and consent of the instructor and approval of the associate dean of natural sciences.

PHYS 499 Senior Examination (0 credits)
This course consists of a comprehensive examination covering the various areas of physics in the undergraduate curriculum. The results of this examination will help the physics discipline assess achievement and improve the program. Prerequisite: senior standing. Spring semester.

Political Science

POLI / AMER 130 United States Politics and Government (Core: IS)
This course is a survey of the U.S. political system at the national, state and local levels. Students will engage in an examination of several elements key to understanding the role of government and politics. They will examine the U.S. Constitution and state constitutions as well as social and political ideology, mass political behavior, parties and interest groups, Congress, the presidency, the courts and the development of national public policy. In this course there will be a focus on the problems of policy making in a pluralistic democratic system.

POLI 131 American Multicultural Politics (Core: DD)
There is much talk about how the US Census Bureau’s estimate that by 2020, white children will make up less than half of the nation's minors and by 2044, all whites will make up less than half of the nation’s population might impact us as a country. From the drafting of the American Constitution through contemporary politics, race and ethnicity and the struggle for emancipation, inclusion, and equality by different groups within society have shaped the debates over how we should govern ourselves. This course will help students understand the structure, function, and impact that political institutions have on American life and politics through the analysis of race and ethnicity. This is a vital knowledge base and skill set for any student to meaningfully participate in our changing nation.

POLI / INTL 150 Introduction to International Studies (Core: BB)
The objective of this course is to promote an awareness of global interdependence, with its challenges and opportunities. The course is interdisciplinary, examining issues from several relevant and related points of view – political, ecological, cultural, economic and ethical. The content may vary from semester to semester. Examples of issues the course might examine are nationalism vs. the concept of an international community; U.S. foreign policy and human rights; foreign policy of communist countries; cultural diversity and international cooperation.

POLI / INTL 160 Introduction to Comparative Politics
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the comparative insights and methodological tools needed to understand the importance of political culture, governmental structures and political behavior in a variety of political systems. This course will also address the development of the state under different historical conditions and in different socio- economic environments. Students will be exposed to a variety of political issues including political legitimacy, political institutionalization, the politics of identity and political violence. Spring semester alternate years. Infrequently offered.

POLI 200 Research Methodology and Techniques
The course examines the fundamental methods and techniques used in political science research. Students will understand the development and use of both qualitative and quantitative analysis. Emphasis is on concept formation and measurement, hypothesis development, research design, data collection, hypothesis testing and generating, statistical association, theory construction and ethics in political science research. Prerequisite: POLI 130 or POLI 150 or POLI 160.

POLI 231 State and Local Politics
Students will be able to examine state and local politics focusing on the legal and theoretical bases of state and local government. Discussions will also include intergovernmental relations, government institutions and comparative public policy. Emphasis is placed on understanding state and local politics within a framework of competition among state and local governments. Prerequisite: POLI 130. Fall semester, alternate years.

POLI 232 Red State, Blue State: American Political Polarization (Core: DD)
The media is full of Chicken Littles saying, “the sky is falling, the sky is falling,” about how bad American politics is these days. Every day the news covers congressional gridlock and fighting. Some even question whether American democracy will survive. But, how bad is it really? The answer to that is actually quite complex and is the cornerstone of this course. We will first define and measure the current era of political polarization by examining how different societal groups and regions differ from one another on a multitude of political and social issues. While this will give us a sense of “how bad” things are currently, we cannot fully appreciate the severity of current polarization without putting it in the larger context of comparing it with historical U.S. examples and examples from other countries. Finally, we will learn about the origins of this current era of polarization: “how did we get here?” in order to discuss potential solutions and forecast the future health of American democracy. This course is based on the assumption of no prior knowledge about American politics. Political polarization is used as a frame to enter into learning about current events and the structure and culture of American politics and government.

POLI 237 Courts and Justice in the U.S.
This course provides an introduction to the system of courts in the United States and the actors and institutions that attempt to provide justice under criminal and civil law.  The politics and the policy produced by the American legal system will help structure the review of primary and secondary source material.  Prerequisite: POLI 130 or permission of the instructor.  Fall semester, alternate years.

POLI 248 Trial Advocacy (2 credits)
This course provides an introduction to civil and criminal litigation in the context of the American judicial system with a focus on courtroom procedures, evidence, witness preparation and examination, and the art of advocacy. Although intended for the training of students who hope to compete with the St. Norbert mock trial team, the course is open to any student interested in learning more about the courts and the legal process. Prerequisites: POLI 130 or instructor’s consent, sophomore standing. Fall semester.

POLI 249 Mock Trial (2 credits)
This course exposes students to the process of presenting a criminal or civil case in the context of an intercollegiate competition. Students will adopt roles as attorneys and witnesses for both the prosecution plaintiff and defense. Prerequisites: POLI 248 or instructor’s consent, sophomore standing. Spring semester.

POLI 310 Fascism and Socialism (Adv. Core: IS)
This course examines the political ideologies which have influenced the Western world and been extended to the Non-Western world as well. Ideology means a body of political thought or belief which motivates groups to take political action. The course begins with an overview of the philosophical roots of political ideology in Western political thought and focuses on the development of political ideas and movements in the 19th and 20th centuries. The course includes studies of nationalism, liberal democracy, democratic socialism, Marxism, Soviet and Chinese communism, fascism, national socialism, anarchism and various radical and traditionalist movements.

POLI / PHIL / CLAS 314 Classical and Medieval Political Thought
This course is an examination of the political theories of major ancient and medieval thinkers. Issues such as the origin, purpose, nature and types of political societies, the meaning of citizenship, the relation of the individual to society, and the meaning of authority and rulership will be investigated in the writings of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas. Fall semester, alternate years.

PHIL 316 Modern Political Thought
This course is an examination of the political theories of major thinkers of the modern period (16th-19th centuries). Issues such as the nature of political power, the origin and purpose of political societies, social contract, authority, law, liberty, sovereignty and revolution will be investigated through the writings of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hegel and Marx. Fall semester, alternate years.

POLI 317 American Political Thought
This course provides students with an introduction to the writings of the American founding, including the Federalist Papers and the thinkers who helped develop the American political tradition. In addition, students will explore the transformation of American thought during the course of the nation’s history, reviewing authors who wrote at the time of the Civil War, the Industrial Revolution and the transformative periods of the 20th century. Spring semester, alternate years.

POLI / COME 329 Political Communication (Adv. Core: WT)
This course uses rhetorical theory and criticism as well as empirical evidence concerning the content and effects of political messages to aid citizens in becoming better consumers and critics of political communication. Political speeches, political advertisements, political debates and political media will be explored in the context of both primary and general election campaigns. Fall semester.

POLI 332 Political Parties and Elections
Students will examine the role of political parties and elections at the state and national level in the U.S. The course will focus on elections as a linkage mechanism between the citizens and the institutions of government in a democracy. There will also be an emphasis on important issues such as nomination processes, the role of the media, campaign advertising, campaign strategy, citizen participation and voting behavior. Prerequisite: POLI 130. Fall semester, alternate years.

POLI 333 American Conspiracy Theories (Adv. Core: IS)
This course will examine the content, causes, and effects of conspiracy theories in the US from the colonial times to the present. Primary questions to be addressed in this course are: why do people believe conspiracy theories? Are some more prone to belief than others? Does belief in conspiracies lead to violence? What have been some of the major conspiracy theories in US history and how have they affected social movements, elections, and public policies? How are conspiracy theories affecting current political discourse? Has our belief in conspiracies grown over time? Assignments for the course will include reading reviews of the textbook chapters, internet searches and mini presentations on US conspiracies from which students will select a few for fact-checking and analysis. Summer sessions.

POLI 338 Introduction to Public Administration
An examination of the growth of the public sector in the U.S. and the consequences and challenges resulting from that growth. Emphasis is placed on the politics of bureaucracy, the relative roles of the public and private sectors in providing goods and services, and past and present controversies over the appropriate method of organizing the public sector. Prerequisite: POLI 130. Spring semester, alternate years.

POLI 341 Constitutional Law: Institutional Powers
This course examines how the United States Constitution both empowers and limits the state and federal governments. Legal doctrines that define federalism, the separation of powers, the regulation of commerce and economic rights will be examined through the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court.  These writings will be used to understand the impact of the Court on the nation’s social, economic, and political systems. Prerequisites: POLI 130 or permission of the instructor, sophomore standing.  Fall semester, alternate years.

POLI 342 Constitutional Law: Civil Rights/Liberties
This course examines the manner in which the United States Supreme Court has defined rights and liberties that are protected by the Bill of Rights and the Constitution.  Students will learn the extent of their speech, religious, and privacy rights as well as protections afforded the criminally accused.  Decisions of the United States Supreme Court will be examined and the impact those decisions have on the politics and culture of the nation.  Prerequisite: POLI 130 or permission of the instructor, sophomore standing.  Spring semester, alternate years.

POLI 343 Administrative Law and Politics
This course investigates the relationship of government agencies to legislative and legal institutions and the manner in which government regulates through the bureaucracy. The course also makes students aware of the impact agencies have on citizens, businesses, industry and interest groups through the development and enforcement of legal rules. The course evaluates the political, social and economic impact of bureaucracies on the operation of various institutions that regulate and influence American life. POLI 130 recommended but not required.

POLI / AMER 345 Congress and the Presidency
In this course the structures and politics of Congress and the Presidency will be analyzed. Students will be exposed to the foundations and institutional arrangements of each branch and will review congressional and presidential procedures in lawmaking and policy-making. The course will also assess congressional and presidential power over time and the manner in which both branches interact institutionally as well as how they interact with the American public and society in electoral processes.

POLI 346 Policy Analysis
This course consists of two parts. The first part examines the policy process in American government, the content of contemporary policy and the impact of policy on society. Case studies will illustrate the nature of policy-making and problems of implementing public policy. The second part of the course will introduce various tools and methods which will enable students to analyze public policy. Prerequisites: POLI 130, SSCI 224 and POLI 200, sophomore standing. Spring semester, alternate years.

POLI 348 Environmental Politics
Students will examine the social and political trends that have contributed to the environmental hazards we now face. Various theoretical approaches that discuss human relations with the environment will be examined in the context of critical issues such as global warming, setting of toxic waste facilities and the pollution of the Fox River. Prerequisite: POLI 130. Fall semester, alternate years.

POLI 350 International Relations
This course examines the main theories of international relations, including realism, neo-realism, liberalism, the English School, economic structuralism, IR feminist theories, critical theory, constructivist theories and normative theories. Students will acquire the intellectual tools necessary to understand, criticize and apply these theories and others of international relations. Prerequisite: POLI / INTL 150.

POLI / PEAC 352 Conceptions of Human Rights (Adv. Core: BB)
This course critically reviews and analyzes the meaning, definitions, history and development of human rights in world politics. It approaches the subject matter both from a political science and law perspective, which see human rights as ascribed rights that come from birth, and from a sociological perspective which takes into account the power relationships that are built into the understandings and differential usage of the concept of human rights. While the legal and political theory has a lot of explanatory power in terms of tracing the evolutionary trajectory of international human rights law after World War II, sociology accounts for the cultural, societal and historical context in which the discussion of human rights arises. In this framework, the course looks at alternative views regarding the definitions, history and development of human rights in the Western and non-Western contexts.

POLI 353 United States Foreign Policy
This course examines the formulation, conduct and content of contemporary U.S. foreign policies during the 20th century and at the onset of the 21st century. Students will examine the role and impact of various governmental actors in the formulation of U.S. foreign policy. They will also examine theories of foreign policy decision-making and key aspects of U.S. regional foreign policies. Prerequisite: POLI / INTL 150.

POLI 355 International Organizations
This course examines the role of international organizations in world politics. It focuses on the historical development of international organizations and their increasing impact on a wide range of global issues, including peacekeeping, human rights, the world economy and the environment. The course provides students with the theoretical tools and concepts they need to understand the dynamics of the institutional structures and political processes of international organizations in an increasingly interdependent world. Prerequisite: POLI / INTL 150.

POLI 362 Globalization and the Developing World in the 21st Century (Adv. Core: BB)
This course explores the impact of globalization on the political institutions of developing nations. It addresses the complex political, economic and social challenges and opportunities that the Global South faces in an increasingly interdependent world. Students will focus on the political histories of developing nations, the make-up of their political structures and institutions, the proliferation of domestic and international political actors and the emergence of diverse forms of democratic regimes. Students will be encouraged to explore the legitimacy and efficacy of national, subnational and supranational forms of governance in the 21st century.

POLI 365 European Politics
This course is an examination of the political systems of a number of European countries. Attention will be given to their historical evolution, ideologies and political cultures as possible explanatory factors for the similarities and differences among the systems. Prerequisite: POLI 150.

POLI 368 Latin American Politics Through Film, Art, Poetry, and Music (Adv. Core: BB)
This course provides an overview of the governments and politics of Latin American countries from a comparative perspective. The course examines the structure, functioning and interaction of political institutions in Latin American countries. Students will be exposed to various topics including political and economic development, globalization and social movements and competing political ideologies.

POLI 410 Global Political Extremism (Adv. Core: BB)
This course will focus on political extremism around the world. Different countries will be compared, allowing students to examine commonalities in the origins of political extremism between vastly different cultures. While the emphasis of the course will be on current manifestations of extremism, historical examples will also be used for comparison. Primary questions to be addressed in the course will be: what are the causes of extremism; what commonalities can be seen across different cultures and historical eras; what are the unique cultural and historical features that manifest in different forms of political extremism; how does political extremism affect different societies; how does political extremism affect current global political discourse and policy; and what can be done to try to prevent violence caused by political extremism.

POLI 450 The United Nations Seminar
Students learn about world politics from scholars and practitioners during two weeks at UN headquarters in New York City, Geneva, and The Hague. Topics include peacekeeping, gendered development and human rights. Students see international relations in the making, visiting UN missions and meeting diplomats to discuss current world developments. Summer session.

POLI 389/489 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
This is a seminar course that is offered whenever a mutual interest in a more specialized topic in political science exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent.

POLI 490 Independent Study
Individual study of an approved topic in political science under the direction of a political science faculty member, permitting faculty and students to explore together some subject of special or personal interest. Reading and tutorial discussion are required, written work is optional. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and approval of associate dean of social sciences.

POLI 492 Directed Research
Qualified students may perform political science research projects under the supervision of a political science faculty member. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and approval of associate dean of social sciences.

POLI 494 Internship
Appropriate work or active political experience with government agencies or partisan political groups may be undertaken for course credit when directly related to the educational goals of the student. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and approval of the associate dean of social sciences.

POLI 499 Political Science Senior Assessment (0 credits)
This course consists of a single three-hour session during which students complete a standardized test of knowledge of the major field and/or other measures of the intended learning outcomes of the political science program. The data gathered during the session assists members of the political science faculty in their efforts to monitor and improve the program. Students should register for the assessment as part of their final semester of coursework at the college.

Psychology

PSYC 100 General Psychology (Core: IS)
This course provides a survey of the many aspects of behavior which are of interest to psychologists. This includes a survey of the nervous system and biological bases of behavior, mental processes, human development, learning theory, personality, mental health and abnormality, interaction and group dynamics, and other aspects of social behavior. The course introduces the scientific methods used in all the basic fields of modern psychology and covers alternative ways of understanding the human experience. The focus of the course is on the complex interplay between external and internal stimuli and the environmental, individual, social and cultural factors affecting human behavior and relationships.

PSYC 212 Abnormal Psychology
Examines the diagnostic criteria for a range of mental disorders, encouraging students to consider the similarities and differences across forms of psychopathology. Although emphasis is placed on the symptoms and features of disorders, the prevalence, causes, and treatments for disorders are also discussed. A priority is also placed on developing and practicing critical awareness skills in relation to mental health and illness. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or instructor’s consent. Spring semester and alternate fall semesters.

PSYC 220 Lifespan Human Development
The course provides an examination of the physical and psychosocial factors which influence human development from birth until death. The work of various scholars, both historical and contemporary, is considered in an attempt to provide several perspectives on the process of development throughout the human lifespan. Emphasis will be on the normative social, cognitive, emotional, and physical development of people across the lifespan, while acknowledging the important role of biological and cultural factors.

PSYC 221 Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Psychological principles and research methods are used to understand individuals’ work-related thoughts, feelings and actions. Major topics in human resources (e.g. selection and training), organizational psychology (for example, leadership and motivation) and workplace characteristics (e.g. safety and health and workplace technology) are surveyed. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or instructor’s consent. Spring, odd-numbered years.

PSYC 230 Adult Development and Aging
This developmental science course focuses on change and stability in the later part of the lifespan. Some topics to be covered include brain development, biological aging, stress and health, gains and losses in cognitive functioning, and parenting practices and beliefs. Research findings will be discussed in terms of broader cultural context, stereotypes, and social policy implications. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or instructor’s consent. Spring, odd-numbered years.

PSYC 281 Environmental Psychology
Students in this course will examine how we affect the built and natural environments and how they affect us. Topics include cognitive mapping, personal space, territoriality and environmental design (e.g. residential, learning, work and leisure environments). The course concludes with a discussion on how we might promote more harmonious and environmentally constructive interactions with our planet. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or instructor’s consent. Fall, odd-numbered years.

PSYC 289 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
A course on a special topic in psychology designed primarily for first- and second- year students. Offered whenever a mutual interest exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.

PSYC 301 Basic Principles and Methods of Psychological Research
This course provides an introduction to many of the basic principles involved in research, including hypothesis formulation and testing, experimental control, measurement issues and research ethics. The course also addresses a variety of basic research methods and issues in data collection and analysis. Laboratory experiences will provide students with an opportunity to practice relevant skills. Prerequisites: PSYC 100 and SSCI 224.

PSYC 302 Adolescent Development
Adolescence is a time of great potential and vulnerability, beginning at puberty and ending at 25 years old. In this class students will be provided with a perspective that links one’s own teenage years to the main themes found in adolescent development. From a biological perspective, students will focus on pubertal and brain changes. From a social perspective, students will explore the role of the family, early experiences, and gender roles as they influence adolescent development. Students will also learn about the main theories of cognitive development and the main contributors to adolescent decision making. This is also a service-learning course, and we will be working with a community partner throughout the semester. Student are expected to complete 30 hours of service. Prerequisite: PSYC 220. Spring semester.

PSYC 310 Chemical Substances and Behavior
This course is designed to provide a broad, general introduction to behavioral pharmacology by examining the neurological, physiological and psychological mechanisms of drug action. Topics covered include tolerance, side effects, drug interactions, and abuse potential of both recreational and therapeutic drugs. In addition, societal issues associated with drug use and abuse will be examined (for example, decriminalization and public costs of drug dependence). Prerequisites: PSYC 100 or BIOL 121 and sophomore standing. Spring, even-numbered years.

PSYC 312 Personality Psychology
Provides an introduction to the theories, research methods, and assessment approaches in personality psychology, addressing questions such as: What is personality? How does personality develop? Can personality change? What does personality “do” in people’s everyday lives? Historical and contemporary perspectives are described and critiqued. Active student participation during frequent in-class discussions and in partner/group work is essential. Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Fall, alternate years.

PSYC 315 Childhood Adversity and Resilience
This course is designed to give a multilevel perspective on the social, biological, and neurological consequences of childhood adversity, such as poverty, maltreatment, and institutionalization. Students will learn about the importance of timing and duration of adversity as well as type of adversity. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how the biological realities of early adversity contribute to emotional and behavioral problems later in life. Students will also consider how some children appear resilient in the face of these challenges while other children face lifelong obstacles due to their experiences. In addition to learning about forms of adversity, we will be serving children at risk for these experiences during the semester, working with a pre-selected community partner. Students are expected to complete 30 hours of service during the course of the semester. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, PSYC 301. Fall semester.

PSYC 321 Social Psychology
The influence of others on the thoughts, feelings and actions of the individual is examined. Major topics in social cognition (person perception, attribution), social evaluation (attitudes, prejudice), social influence (obedience, conformity) and social interaction (altruism, aggression) are surveyed. Differing theoretical perspectives and research methodologies are analyzed. Prerequisite: PSYC 301 or instructor’s consent. Fall semester.

PSYC 325 Group Dynamics
The interplay of groups and group members is examined. Major topics in group development and formation (e.g., affiliation, norms), influence and interaction within the group (e.g., conformity, leadership), group performance (for example, teamwork, decision-making) and group conflict (e.g., conflict within groups and conflict between groups) are surveyed. Prerequisites: PSYC 100 and SSCI 224 or instructor’s consent. Spring, even-numbered years.

PSYC 331 Sensation and Perception with Laboratory
Students in this laboratory course will explore how humans sense and perceive the world via visual, auditory, chemical and skin senses. Physiological, psychophysical and cognitive approaches will be used to help explain how perceptions arise from the conversion of physical energy in the environment to electrochemical signals and how the brain then processes these signals. Topics include perceptual development, clinical aspects of vision and audition, music, speech, and pain perception as well as applications with respect to art, education and health. Prerequisite: PSYC 301 or instructor’s consent. Spring semester.

PSYC 337 Memory and Cognition with Laboratory
Examines historical and contemporary research in the study of human cognitive processes, with particular emphasis on the area of memory. Topics covered include attention, perception of symbolic material, mental imagery, problem-solving and language. The course includes labs which provide in-depth applications of course concepts. Prerequisite: PSYC 301 or instructor’s consent. Fall semester.

PSYC 345 Psychological Interventions
A survey of the major systems of psychotherapy, including psychodynamic, humanistic / existential, behavioral, cognitive and systems perspectives. Representative approaches within each perspective are reviewed, with coverage of the goals, therapeutic techniques and procedures, therapist/client relationship, and strengths and limitations of each approach. Prerequisite: PSYC 212. Spring semester.

PSYC 370 Physiological Psychology with Laboratory
The purpose of this laboratory course is to relate behavior to bodily processes, especially the working of the brain. Topics covered include functional neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, brain evolution, motor control and neural plasticity, regulation of internal states, sexual behavior, emotions, memory and cognition, and neurological disorders. Different research methodologies employed to investigate the biological underpinnings of behavior are also analyzed. Prerequisite: PSYC 301. Fall semester.

PYSC 410 Cross-Cultural Psychology
This course situates psychology within a larger cultural context. Students will examine how Western culture has shaped the field by influencing psychologists’ theories and research. Approaches in cross-cultural psychology, as in the study of people across ecological settings and sociocultural contexts, will be introduced as a means of assessing the universality of psychological theories, i.e., whether such theories can be generalized to all human beings Students will also be exposed to cross-cultural research so that they may better appreciate the effects of culture on psychological processes. Prerequisite: senior standing. Fall semester.

PSYC 420 A History of Psychology
This course places psychology within its historical context. The factors outside of psychology that have had an impact on theory and research and the dynamics within psychology that have shaped the field are examined. The contributions of philosophy and physiology to the founding of modern psychology are considered at the outset, while the majority of the course is devoted to the history of psychology since 1879. The course is organized around the development of the major schools of modern psychological thought and focuses on the lives and contributions of prominent psychologists. Prerequisite: senior standing. Spring semester.

PSYC 489 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
An advanced-level course for junior and senior students on a special topic in psychology. Offered whenever a mutual interest exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students. Prerequisite: PSYC 301.

PSYC 490 Independent Study (2 or 4 credits)
Individual study of an approved topic in psychology under the direction of a psychology faculty member. Permits faculty and students to explore together some subject of special or personal interest. Reading and tutorial discussion are required, written work is optional. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and approval of the associate dean of social sciences.

PSYC 492 Directed Research (2 or 4 credits)
Qualified students may perform psychology research projects under the supervision of a psychology faculty member. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent and approval of the associate dean of social sciences.

PSYC 494 Internship and Professional Issues
This course requires both class meetings and engagement in work activities at local internship sites. Class meetings focus on professional development (e.g., mentoring relationships, ethical conduct) and current issues in the practice of psychology in real-world settings. Each student is responsible for obtaining a placement at an internship site prior to the start of the course, and all students also work as a team on service learning activities. Between internship and service learning activities, each student will accumulate 120 hours of experience outside of the classroom. Interested students are required to meet with and receive instructor consent prior to registration. Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing; instructor consent; minimum GPA of 2.50. Note: internship sites will likely be “off-campus” and thus require that students have a means of transportation.

PSYC 499 Senior Assessment (0 credit)
This course consists of a single three-hour session during which students complete standardized tests of knowledge of the major field and/or other measures of the intended learning outcomes of the psychology program. The data gathered during the session assists members of the psychology faculty in their efforts to monitor and improve the program. Students should register for the assessment as part of their final semester of coursework at the college.

Social Sciences

SSCI 103 Difference, Diversity, and Power (Core: DD)
This course provides foundational knowledge about difference and diversity across the various social identities in current U.S. society with specific focus on race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and (dis)abilities. It will also focus on the ways in which these identities intersect in people’s lives. A combination of readings, media, experiential exercises, dialogue and writing assignments will familiarize students with the main concepts, theories and empirical research related to social science understandings of diversity and social identity in the United States context.

SSCI 129 Colonialism and Cultural Imperialism in Latin America
This course will introduce students to the complex region of Latin America, particularly the country of Guatemala. Latin America is a region defined by centuries of colonial domination, plantation slavery, and popular struggle over the economic promise of bananas, coffee, and tobacco. The scope of the course will cover a broad range of topics beginning with an overview of pre-Columbian cultures and indigenous settlements throughout Latin America, through European contact and colonial imperialism (via plantation slavery), to eventual decolonization. The course will continue with a contemporary analysis of whether cultural imperialism and hegemony are still present in Guatemala based on first-hand service learning experience working with De La Gente  - a Guatemalan-based non-governmental organization that works with coffee farming communities to create economic opportunity that improves the quality of life for their families and communities. 


SSCI 205 Disability and American Society (Core: DD)
This course provides an overview of several essential issues related to disability and its status, standing and treatment in American society – past and present. Topics covered include definitions of disability; an historical overview of social beliefs and practices related to disability in the United States; the impact of disability on schools and other educational institutions; the role of eugenics in social efforts to address disability; the disability rights movement; federal legislation pertaining to disability; and extensive exploration of the voices of persons with disabilities and their views on the treatment of the disabled in American society.

SSCI 224 Basic Statistics (Core: QR)
Introduction to the basic statistical concepts and techniques (including computer-based software programs) for data analysis in the non-business Social Sciences. Includes descriptive statistics, random sampling and probability, correlation, regression, hypothesis testing and parametric / nonparametric inferential statistics. Intended for students in education, political science, psychology and sociology; also appropriate for students in the natural sciences. Prerequisite: Advanced high school algebra or MATH 102. Recommended sophomore standing or above.

SSCI 301 Environment and Society (Adv. Core: PN)
This course familiarizes students with an array of environmental issues concerning human interaction with the natural world. Environmental problems are present at all scales ranging from local to global — and in our everyday lives. The course will examine, via lecture and discussion/lab sessions, varied examples of environmental issues — their causes, dimensions, and distributions. The course will explore proven or possible solutions, and “trade-offs” associated with these solutions. Topics include basic ecological principles, the value of biodiversity, human population issues, food production, air and water pollution, and energy resources and use. Offered each semester. Students may not take both SSCI 301 and ENVS 300 for credit.

SSCI 389 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
An interdisciplinary course which deals with topics involving two or more social sciences. May be team-taught by faculty from the academic areas from which the topic has emerged. Enrollment will normally be limited to upper-division students. This course may be repeated since the topics will vary.

SSCI 408 Social Inequalities: Race and Minority Relations (Adv. Core: DD)
The exploration of social inequality will move beyond the place of individuals in society and try to understand how social inequality is a feature of society. Students will see themselves in some of what they are studying and they will find much of the subject matter familiar. At the same time, the course is intended to encourage students to think in different ways about some of what is “known” and taken for granted in large sections of society. Students will read materials that may present perspectives far different from what they have heard before. It is expected that students will be surprised, perplexed, challenged and perhaps angered by some of the material. Moreover, because the course examines issues that affect us daily, this course will elicit more than intellectual growth. Since each person is a part of the world and occupies positions in systems of social inequality, students will find themselves dealing with emotional and spiritual questions about who they are and where they fit into the world.

Sociology

SOCI 100 Introduction to Sociology (Core: IS)
This course examines the basic nature of human relationships, customs, institutions, social structure and culture. It emphasizes how they affect our beliefs and behavior and how they express our fundamental concerns and values. The course teaches the basic concepts, methods and perspectives of sociology as a social science and it uses them to consider such topics as family life, groups and organizations, racial/ethnic, gender and class inequality, religious and political movements, and social problems. 

SOCI 122 Criminology
Criminology is the scientific study of crime and criminal behavior. This class will survey classic and contemporary theoretical and empirical scholarship dedicated to understanding the nature and extent of criminal actions, the social organization of efforts to control criminal behavior, and the effectiveness of such efforts.

SOCI 220 American Culture and Consumption (Core: DD)
This course uses a sociological perspective to explore cultural production and consumption in the United States. It examines the relationship between culture and society with a focus on how cultural consumption is linked to status, boundaries, inclusion, exclusion, and inequality. In what ways are cultural norms, values and objects associated with status, class, race, gender, sexuality, and/or other intersecting identities? How is American culture impacted by global changes? Course readings and assignments will encourage students to question their cultural environments. We will treat culture as a serious and measurable topic of academic inquiry, not something merely associated with entertainment and leisure or an abstract concept that cannot be scientifically analyzed. Summer sessions. 

SOCI 228 Corrections in American Society
This course focuses on society’s organized response to individuals accused or convicted of criminal offenses. Students in the course will study the philosophy, theory, and practice of corrections systems and strategies for adults and juveniles; empirical research on the effectiveness of various corrections strategies and; contemporary challenges and debates about corrections practices in the United States.

SOCI 233 Sociology of Education
Do schools matter? This course will seriously examine this question by investigating the complex ways in which schools and society interact. To do this, we will examine the historical development of schools in America, but our primary focus will be a close investigation of the ways in which schools are embedded in racial, economic, social, and geographic contexts. We will also turn our attention to how teachers, parents, and students interact within the classroom. In the end, our primary goal is to understand when and how schools contribute to inequality and stratification, and how public policy and culture influences when and how schools matter.

SOCI 237 Children and Childhood in American Society
This course explores two interrelated topics: the social construction of childhood and the everyday lives of children. Taking a new sociology of childhood approach, the course pays attention to culture, structure, and agency in understanding children’s lives and the diversity of experiences among children living in the United States. Students in this course will study: continuity and change in ideas about children and childhood over the course of U.S. history; classic and current sociological theory about childhood and children; research methods for studying children; and empirical studies of children’s lives, past and present.

SOCI 238 Human Behavior in the Social Environment
This course examines theories and knowledge of human biological, sociological, cultural, psychological, and spiritual development across the lifespan. Individual, family, group, organizational, and community social systems are explored to assess the ways these social systems promote or deter people in maintaining or achieving health and wellbeing.

SOCI 239 Social Welfare Policy and Services
The history and current state of social welfare policy and services is the major focus of this course. Various frameworks and methods used by policy scholars to analyze social welfare policy will be introduced and applied. Past and present examples of social welfare policy at federal, state, county, city and agency levels will be studied in terms of the historical and contemporary factors that shaped them; the political and organizational process that influenced them; their impact on social welfare services, practices and practitioners; and the extent to which they help or hinder the general health and well-being of people. This course will also study the history, mission and philosophy of the social work profession.

SOCI 241 Social Work Practice: Organizations, Communities and Institutions
This course focuses on generalist social work practice with groups, organizations and communities and developing cultural competence in social work practice. Students will learn about organizational culture, agency policy, developing and managing agency resources and implementing agency change. The course will also cover approaches to community change, evaluating macro practice, advocacy and social action. Content will emphasize professional relationships that are characterized by mutuality, collaboration, respect for the client system and incorporate use of social work supervision within macro practice. The course will also cover the knowledge, values and skills to enhance human well-being and amelioration of the environmental conditions that affect people adversely. Emphasis is placed on practice skills by working with clients of differing social, racial, religious, spiritual and class backgrounds and with systems of all sizes, including an understanding of differential assessments and intervention skills to serve diverse at-risk populations.

SOCI 242 Social Work Practice: Groups and Families
This course presents the generalist practice approach in social work focusing on groups and families. An introduction to family systems theory, family social work, group dynamics, and group work practice will be explored, along with techniques in assessment, intervention, and evaluation in the family and group context. Information will include the development of professional relationships that are characterized by mutuality, collaboration and respect for the client system. Content on social work values and ethics and cultural competence will be discussed.

SOCI 243 Social Work Practice: Individuals
This course presents the generalist practice approach in social work focusing on individual practice methods. Students will learn the evidenced-based approach, generalist intervention model, and develop skills to engage with, assess, intervene with, and evaluate individuals, with particular emphasis on client strengths and problems in the interaction among individuals and between people and their environments. Content will include social work values and ethics, including the application of the standards of the National Association of Social Workers code of ethics, and cultural competence in social work practice.

SOCI 250 Immigration and Migration in the United States
In this course we will use the insights of sociology to understand migration and, more specifically, immigration.  Recognizing that migration is a global phenomenon, students will focus mainly on migration and immigration in the context of the United States, while also attending to how patterns observed in the U.S. context are part of wider, global patterns with local manifestations.  They will study key population movements to and within the U.S., past and present. They will explore the multiple factors that influence the migration/immigration experience for migrants and their families and that shape the short and long-term outcomes of the experience. The impact of migration on sending and receiving communities, and the history and current state of immigration policy will also be addressed.

SOCI 289 Special Topics
A seminar course primarily designed for freshmen, sophomores and juniors on a special topic in sociology. It may be proposed by either students or an interested faculty member. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent.

SOCI 300 Social Research Methods
In this class, students learn how social scientists conduct research to test their assumptions and develop scientific accounts of patterns of human action, attitudes, and social life. This course provides a general overview of scientific methods of analysis —both quantitative and qualitative — and gives students opportunities to try them out. They will develop and implement a research project and learn how to be conscientious consumers of research. The core concepts of sociological research are powerful tools even for those who never do social science professionally. The skills learned in this class — asking good questions, finding relevant data sources and literature, understanding ethical issues associated with research — will last long after the semester ends. Prerequisite: SSCI 224.

SOCI 344 Social Movements
This course investigates the people who have mobilized to change the shape of their society, often at great personal risk. We will consider what has motivated these activists and what has sustained them through hard times and difficult odds. We will look at their successes as well as their mistakes made along the way. We will examine how the contours of society today are different as a result of their activism. The course traces the development of major movements of the 20th and 21st centuries, including labor, civil rights/Black Power, student, feminist, gay/queer activism, and environmental/human rights struggles by indigenous peoples. We will look at what set these movements into motion, structured their form, and affected what they have achieved. We will investigate the role of resources, strategy, culture and biography in protest.

SOCI / WMGS 346 Intersections of Privilege (Adv. Core: DD)
This course engages in an interdisciplinary and multi-media examination of social inequality, focusing on the complex and intersecting ways that social groups gain advantage over and marginalize others. Students will examine topics including race (whiteness), sexuality (heterosexuality), gender (masculinity), class (economic and cultural capital), and nationality (global privilege associated with first-world status). This course will integrate perspectives on how privilege is reinforced in day-to-day interactions as well as in larger social structures.

SOCI 348 Socialization and the Life Course
This course will draw on the psychological, sociological, and biological theories and evidence to develop a clear understanding of how social institutions and elements of the social environment — especially race, ethnicity, gender, and social relationships — influence development and social inclusion and exclusion. This course will pay special attention to the nature/nurture debate, families and schools as agents of socialization, and death as a life course stage.

SOCI 352 Foundations of Social Theory (Adv. Core: WT)
This course traces the development of social theory from the Enlightenment to the 21st century. Topics examined include: the nature of science and other forms of knowledge; the relationship between self and society; how social order is maintained; how power is exercised; how meanings emerge; and how change occurs. Running through the course is the question of what social theory offers to us individually and collectively in understanding and acting in a world that is complex and multi-layered.

SOCI / WMGS 361 Gender, Sexuality and Society
While gender and sexuality often appear natural, this course investigates their social roots. Throughout the semester students will explore the diverse ways in which gender and sexuality have been conceptualized, embodied, shaped, policed, and transformed. Additionally, we will examine the relationship between gender, sexuality, inequality, and major social institutions including education, media, work, and family. Finally, we explore the intersections of gender, sexuality, race, and class as they relate to a variety of contemporary issues and controversies, including “hooking up,” marriage laws, gender reassignment surgery, and sex education.

SOCI 380 Sociology of the Gang
In 1928, sociologist Frederick Thrasher published The Gang, a study of 1,313 gangs in Chicago. Today, more than 80 years later, gangs are still part of the American scene and sociologists are still trying to understand the young people who form and join them and the “elemental social processes” that are part of gang phenomena. In this course, we will survey the general theories and findings of sociologists and criminologists who have studied gangs in the U.S., read monographs and articles reporting findings from contemporary studies of gangs and gang behavior, and learn about various approaches to gang prevention and intervention. Prerequisite: SOCI 100 or SOCI 122. Alternate years.

SOCI 444 Health, Illness and Society
Health, just like wealth, is stratified across society. In country, state, city or neighborhood some people or groups are healthy while others are disproportionately sick. In an effort to answer “why,” this course focuses on the sociobehavioral determinants and population distribution of health disparities of the United States. In this class students will examine articles, narratives, charts and graphs, to not only understand disparities in mental and physical health, but to critique them, forming opinions along the way. This course intends to provide answers to three central questions: How do health disparities emerge and propagate? How do social institutions and elements of the social environment – especially race/ethnicity, class, gender, and social relationships – influence health? and How does health influence education, income and occupational status? Fall semester, alternate years.

SOCI 481 / SOCI 482 Human Service Internship
The seminar format of Human Service Internship is organized around the student working in the human service field and the supervision he or she receives in the field. The combination of the internship, field supervision and reflection in seminar is focused on developing student application of knowledge of major social competencies and values necessary for generalist social work practice. An internship should offer the student an opportunity to practice these skills: evaluation and assessment of group and individual psychosocial functioning, plan/policy development and implementation, intervention, referral, advocacy, collaboration, cultural competence and application of professional ethics. Students are expected to locate the internship, with the assistance and approval of the instructor, before the beginning of the semester and should be on site within the first two weeks of school. Internships should meet the state of Wisconsin regulation and licensing requirements which can be obtained from the instructor. Often placements will require the student have their own transportation with a clear driving record (in order to transport clients or drive to see clients in their homes), pass drug and background tests, and have some flexibility in their schedule. Students are expected to work 10 to 12 hours per week for the academic year, with a break between semesters. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent. Year long course.

SOCI 489 Special Topics
This is a seminar course offered whenever a mutual interest in a more-specialized topic in Sociology exists for a member of the faculty and a sufficient number of students. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent.

SOCI 490 Independent Study
Individual study of an approved topic in Sociology under the direction of a Sociology faculty member. Permits faculty and students to explore together some subject of special or personal interest. Reading and tutorial discussion are required, written work is optional. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and approval of the associate dean of social sciences.

SOCI 492 Directed Research
Qualified students may perform sociology research projects under the direction of a Sociology faculty member. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and approval of associate dean of Social Sciences.

Spanish

SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish 1
An introduction to the Spanish language and the diverse cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Emphasis on the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish 2 (Core: SL)
Continuation of SPAN 101. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or formal placement.

SPAN 103 Accelerated Elementary Spanish (Core: SL)
This course consolidates SPAN 101 and SPAN 102 into a one-semester accelerated course of study and is designed for students with prior study at the beginning level. Prerequisite: two to four years of high school Spanish and placement below 102.

SPAN 203 Intermediate Spanish 1 (Core: SL)
Study of intermediate language through grammar, vocabulary, conversation, cultural and literary readings, and written composition. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or formal placement.

SPAN 204 Intermediate Spanish 2 (Core: SL)
A continuation of SPAN 203 with emphasis on continued development in oral and written expression. Prerequisite: SPAN 203 or formal placement.

SPAN 300 Making Connections: Conversation, Composition, and Culture
This course builds on the language skills and cultural knowledge acquired at the elementary and intermediate levels and guides students toward a higher level of creative expression, reading comprehension, textual analysis, and grammatical and cultural understanding. Through such relevant themes as love and relationships, society and the individual, drugs and violence, and media and politics, students will explore the dynamic intersections of language, society and artistic expression. Prerequisite: SPAN 204 or formal placement.

SPAN 301 Introduction to Spanish and Spanish American Literature 1 (Adv. Core: EI)
An introduction to Spanish and Spanish American literature before 1800, including critical terminology and concepts, through class discussion and analysis of major works of poetry, prose and drama. Works and authors may include the Cantar de Mío Cid, Gonzalo de Berceo, the Libro de Buen Amor, Bartolomé de Las Casas, el Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Santa Teresa, Lazarillo de Tormes, Don Quijote de la Mancha, María de Zayas and Tirso de Molina’s El burlador de Sevilla. Prerequisite: SPAN 300. Fall semester.

SPAN 302 Introduction to Spanish and Spanish American Literature 2 (Adv. Core: EI)
An introduction to Spanish and Spanish American literature since 1800, including critical terminology and concepts, through class discussion and analysis of major works of poetry, prose and drama. Authors may include José de Espronceda, Rubén Darío, Gabriela Mistral, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Federico García Lorca, Pablo Neruda, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Gabriel García Márquez and Isabel Allende. Prerequisite: SPAN 300. Spring semester.

SPAN 365 Latin American Civilization: South America and the Caribbean (Adv. Core: BB)
This course introduces the student to the culture and history of Latin America, with an emphasis on South America and the Caribbean. Topics include the pre-Columbian period, the Spanish conquest, the colonial era, independence, the consequences of the Mexican Revolution, the Cuban Revolution, the dirty wars and dictatorships, and the emergence of democratic societies. Students will reflect on the interconnectedness of Latin American history and culture and its relationship to their own. Historical readings are supplemented by literary works, music, visual arts, architecture and film. Prerequisite: SPAN 300. Spring semester, alternate years.

SPAN 370 Latin American Civilization: Mexico and Central America (Adv. Core: BB)
This course introduces the student to the culture and history of Latin America, with an emphasis on Mexico and Central America. Topics include the pre-Columbian period, the Spanish conquest, the colonial era, independence, the Mexican Revolution, the dirty wars and dictatorships, and the emergence of democratic societies. Students will reflect on the interconnectedness of Latin American history and culture and its relationship to their own. Historical readings are supplemented by literary works, music, visual arts, architecture and film. Prerequisite: SPAN 300. Spring semester, alternate years.

SPAN 375 Spanish Civilization (Adv. Core: BB)
This course introduces students to the culture and history of Spain. Topics include the Muslim conquest in the 8th century; the Christians’ centuries-long effort to “reconquer” the peninsula; the cultural struggle between “enlightened” progressives and Spanish traditionalists which began in the 18th century and eventually culminated in civil war; the repressive Franco dictatorship of the 20th century; and the successful transition to democracy. Historical readings are supplemented by an examination of literary works, paintings and film. Prerequisite: SPAN 300. Fall semester.

SPAN 389 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
This course explores topics of special interest. Topics may include Hispanic cinema, Hispanics in the U.S., Latin American detective fiction, the Spanish Golden Age, medieval and early modern women writers of Spain, contemporary Hispanic theatre, or recent Latin American narrative or poetry. The course may be taken more than once for credit if the topic is different. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or SPAN 302.

SPAN 400 Senior Capstone Seminar
The material of this course will center on a particular topic, which may change from year to year. This topic will be examined through various media, including literary and non-literary texts and film. Prerequisites: One academic semester in a Spanish-speaking country and successful completion of other required courses in the major.

Theatre Studies

THEA 101 Introduction to Live Performance (Core: EI)
This course introduces students to first identify, describe and analyze various ways in which they encounter live performance in their daily lives (sporting events, church attendance, school assignments, party games, rock concerts, etc.) in order to begin to understand and develop standards of criticism. Additionally, basic theatrical forms will be introduced as a way of describing and expanding students’ awareness of how live performance influences recorded media.

THEA 102 Creation of Sign and Symbol (Core: EI)
This course is an introduction to both the process of creating symbolism as well as critically analyzing how signs and symbols are used in our culture. Students will learn to evaluate, on both a visual and intellectual level, how we use imagery to create ideas and convey messages through the use of visual media.

THEA 201 Design for Performance
This course is a practical studio course that, utilizing a broad definition of performance, covers the fundamentals of three-dimensional design in space and time. Covers research, concepting and presentation of design solutions. Will deal with scenic design, clothing, light and sound as elements of performance. Prerequisites: THEA 101 and THEA 102.

THEA 232 Basic Acting
This course will deal with the fundamentals of acting. Techniques for developing self-awareness, imagination, observation, concentration and sensory recall will comprise the basic approach. Employment of voice and body in developing characterization will also be studied.

THEA 237 History of Clothing and Fashion (Core: EI)
This class is a survey of the history of clothing and its relationship to culture and society. It will familiarize the student with the period styles from pre-historical to modern times and how these styles are a reflection of individual communication and cultural expression.

THEA 250 Performance and Production Lab (2 credits)
One purpose of the P/P labs is to employ the unique opportunity of working on productions to advance the synthesis of theory and practice. The P/P labs also give students the opportunity to experience the creation of theatre holistically and in a critically self-reflective manner. The process of producing theatre can too often induce students to jump into production without the ability to discuss the process or learn from others. Students are mentored during this process, requiring a formalized class structure in order to frame their experience as a learning tool. All student members of any theatre production will be required to enroll in a P/P lab as a class. Students learn the roles of stage and house manager, props master, master electrician, scenic artist, costume manager, and acting roles. All production running crews.

THEA 301 Technical Theatre
This course is an introduction to the practical skills that go into the creation of theatre with a focus on the behind-the-scenes aspects of production. It will cover information on costume and scenery construction, implementation of lighting and sound designs, properties collection and creation, scene painting and finishing, and the application of makeup for the stage. This course is both theoretical and practical and will require participation in the theatre program’s production laboratory.

THEA 333 Directing
A course in the fundamentals of script analysis, blocking and interpretation. An investigation of the director’s role as artist and coordinator augmented by practical directing lab assignments. Prerequisites: THEA 101 and THEA 102.

THEA 335 Advanced Acting
A continuation, in depth, of the elements covered in THEA 232 with special emphasis on role study and interpretation. Prerequisite: THEA 232.

THEA 336 Theatre History
This course is a survey of the major periods in theatre from the Golden Age of Greece to the beginning of the modern era in the late 19th century. It explores aesthetic movements, significant personalities and artistic styles along with their interaction with the political, social and philosophical realities of the times.

THEA 337 Contemporary Theatre (Adv. Core: WT)
This course is a study of dramatic literature and theater practice in 20th- and 21st-century western civilization. The course explores aesthetic movements, significant personalities and artistic styles along with their interaction with the political, social, economic and philosophical realities of their specific cultures.

THEA 387 History of Architecture and Décor
This class is a survey of the history of architecture/decor and its relationship to culture and society. It will familiarize the student with the period styles from pre-historical to modern times and how these styles are a reflection of individual and societal communication and cultural expression. Summer sessions.

THEA 389 Special Topics
This course concentrates on a topic pertaining to the current needs and interests of faculty and students. The topics covered will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in the course listings whenever the course is offered.

THEA 450 Performance and Production Labs
One purpose of the P/P labs is to employ the unique opportunity of working on productions to advance the synthesis of theory and practice. The P/P labs also give students the opportunity to experience the creation of theatre holistically and in a critically self-reflective manner. The process of producing theatre can too often induce students to jump into production without the ability to discuss the process or learn from others. Students are mentored during this process, requiring a formalized class structure in order to frame their experience as a learning tool. All student members of any theatre production will be required to enroll in a P/P lab as a class. Students learn costume / scenic / light / sound design, major roles and directing. This segment is comparable to a senior capstone. The goal is for the student to create their own work of theatre as a culmination of their education at SNC.

THEA 490 Independent Study
This course allows staff and students to explore together topics of special interest.

THEA 494 Internship
This internship experience allows students to apply their studies in a supervised work situation. Students benefit from an inside look at different kinds of organizations, a chance to work in their field of study, and gain experience using state-of-the-art equipment and practices. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

Theological Studies

THEO 501 Systematic Theology and the Theological Method (3 credits)
This course examines the foundations of theology and theological method. It explores the role of scripture, doctrine, ecclesial practice, philosophy and the sciences in theological reflection. It examines the distinctive and diverse methods that are employed in contemporary Christian thought with special emphasis on practical theology. The central themes of faith, revelation, God, creation and eschatology are addressed.

THEO 502 Historical Development of Christian Tradition (3 credits)
This course studies the development of Christian theological tradition in its unity and diversity, through the contributions of major theological figures, critical movements within the Christian community and the social context in which theology is formed. It explores a variety of approaches to theological inquiry from classical tradition to modern revisions in interpretation, diversity and the research skills necessary for studying theology today.

THEO 503 Scripture and Biblical Interpretation (3 credits)
This is an introduction to contemporary exegetical methods of interpretation through a study of particular biblical texts. The course will also investigate related biblical topics such as inspiration, canonicity and the place of scripture in the Christian community.

THEO 504 Christian Ethics (3 credits)
Christian ethics will examine the basis of a Christian response to moral questions. The study will include the development of a method consistent with the role of a disciple of Jesus and attempt to apply the method to specific issues such as nuclear war, bioethical issues and economic social justice.

THEO 505 Christology (3 credits)
The central question of all Christian theology is Jesus’ challenge, “Who do you say that I am?” The Christian community in every age has explored the question and attempted to answer it in light of scripture and human experience. The course will study both past answers and contemporary positions.

THEO 506 The Nature and Mission of the Church (3 credits)
This course is a historical theological study of the origins, nature and mission of Church: basic images and themes in scripture and tradition; the relation of the kingdom to the Church; the relation of the Church to the world.

THEO 509 General Comprehensive Exam (0 credits; $100 fee)
The general exam is a take-home exam based on readings covered in the core area courses. Questions are based on those readings and will examine the student's knowledge of the core areas and also test their ability to integrate the different areas. The student will be required to address four of the six test questions. Three questions will require the student to synthesize material between various core courses; the fourth question will require the integration of specific core material with the student's area of concentration. Students are allowed a maximum of six weeks to complete and return the exam. Review of notes and material from the courses is useful in preparing for the exam. Students must submit the registration form and fee as well as contact the program coordinator to request the exam. Prerequisites: all core courses (THEO 501-506) and a minimum of three of the five elective courses.

THEO 510 Integrative Colloquium (2 credits)
The colloquium engages students in a learning experience that fosters an integration between theology and the practice of Church ministry (i.e., religious education, liturgy, pastoral ministry, parish administration or youth ministry). The case study method is used to examine various contemporary Church issues and to develop appropriate responses in a process which promotes critical theological reflection, collaborative models of work and intellectual as well as personal self-criticism. Prerequisites: all core courses, elective courses and THEO 509.

THEO 512 Master's Thesis Project 1 (1 credit)
The students develop and, under the supervision of the thesis director, writes the master’s thesis. The director of the Master of Theological Studies program must approve directors of the master's thesis. Enrollment and registration of this course is typically available in the fall semester (De Pere) and spring semester (New Mexico) of each academic year. Graded on a S/F basis.

THEO 513 Master's Thesis Project 2 (1 credit)
Continuation of work that began in THEO 512, culminating in a discussion of the thesis and submission of the finalized, approved work. Prior to final approval, a discussion of the work occurs between the student and a panel of three people (i.e., thesis project director and two readers) at which time the thesis project is either approved, disapproved or conditionally approved with recommendations for improvement. Enrollment and registration in this course is typically available in the spring semester (De Pere) and the summer semester (New Mexico) of each academic year. Graded on an P/F basis.

THEO 520 History and Models of Catechisis (2 credits)
This course will explore the foundations of catechesis through the major movements, principles and people who influenced today’s approaches to catechesis. Students will investigate historical forms of catechesis and the ways they impact how we teach and evangelize today. The task of this course is to discover the reasons “we do what we do” and to recognize the foundational principles for judging the effectiveness of catechetical movements today. The course will examine methods and models of catechesis, addressing the practical issue of how to teach religion and theology, including the Sacraments.

THEO 522 Faith Development (2 credits)
This course offers perspectives on the contributions of theology and developmental psychology to an understanding of faith development through the lens of modern developmental psychology. Students will discuss ways to encourage the development of a spiritual life across the life cycle.

THEO 540 Principles of Liturgy (2 credits)
This course considers the principles of Christian liturgy as the primary expression of the Church's life and spirituality. It will provide a basic overview of the history of Christian liturgy and an exploration of the concepts of ritual action, time, space and the relationship of liturgy and mission. The course will address the current pastoral need for a broader development and understanding of music, environment and art, language and enculturation.

THEO 541 Sacramental Theology (2 credits)
This course is an examination of sacramental theology. This examination includes a brief survey of the development of sacramental practices and theologies in Christian history.   Particular attention is given to contemporary Christian theological understandings of sacramentality and sacraments and of their inherent anthropological, ecclesial and liturgical dimensions. The intimate connection between sacramental celebration and the transformation of the individual, the Christian community and the world is also explored.

THEO 560 Models of Ministry and Leadership in the Church (2 credits)
This course will investigate the theoretical basis for the practice of ministry in the contemporary church. It will examine the collaborative role of leadership and authority within that focus of ministry and servant leadership. After exploring the theological understanding and history of ministry in the community, students will come to an appreciation of the psychological and sociological influence and impact on ministry.

THEO 576 Theology and Practice of Pastoral Care (2 credits)
This course examines major theological models related to pastoral care. It investigates the implications of these different approaches for ministry and for the psychology of pastoral counseling. Self-understanding, biblical and theological teachings, basic psychological theory and helping skills, and working with different populations are the main topics of the course.

THEO 578 Theologies of Ecumenical and Interreligious Dialogue (2 credits)
The task of ministry today has been impacted greatly by the reality of cultural and religious diversity. Promoting mutual understanding and empathy between different Christian traditions as well as between Christian and non-Christian faiths has become of paramount importance. This course examines the historical and theological contexts of recent developments in ecumenism and interreligious dialogue. Special attention is paid to the pastoral and socio-political implications of such developments.

THEO 579 Enculturation and Evangelization (2 credits)
This course explores the dynamic relationships between Christianity and contemporary culture and societies. It focuses on the development of contextual theologies and the unique challenges and opportunities of postmodern society for shaping a distinct Christian identity. Theories and methods of evangelization and of “New Evangelization” will be examined in light of these new cultural and global realities.

THEO 580 Foundations of Spirituality (2 credits)
This course is a historical survey of various forms of Christian spirituality and mysticism.  These spiritualties are examined both in terms of their distinct place in Christian history and for their use in the development of contemporary spirituality that addresses the needs of the Church and the world.

THEO 589 Special Topics
See program schedule for upcoming special topics courses.

THEO 590 Independent Study
This course provides the opportunity to investigate, through independent inquiry and critical analysis, educational theories, practices and agencies that influence the work of teachers. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and approval of M.T.S. director and the associate academic dean.

THEO 594 Theological Practicum (2 credits)
This course is an action/reflection experience for the development of particular pastoral knowledge and skills. Students are placed in a ministerial setting that is appropriate to their area of concentration. Prerequisite: approval by the director of the Master of Theological Studies program.

THEO 600 Continuing Master's Thesis (0 credit; $100 fee)
If a student does not complete the thesis project while enrolled in THEO 513, students are required to register for this course every semester thereafter until the project is completed.

Theology and Religious Studies

THRS 117 Theological Foundations (Core: TF)
This course will introduce students to the principal elements of Christian theology, particularly in the Catholic tradition, including biblical studies, historical and systematic theology, and ethics. It will address foundational theological questions, including: what does it mean to study God, and why do we do it; what sources are available for the investigation of God and how do we evaluate these sources; what images and metaphors have been and continue to be used for God; and what implications does belief in God have on ethical behavior and the building of communities?

THRS 201 The Bible Yesterday and Today (Core: CI)
The Bible plays a greater role in American culture than in any other Western society, a fact demonstrated by the current debates surrounding the teaching of evolution in public schools or the legalization of same-sex marriage. This course explores the following questions: what are the historical reasons for the Bible’s present influence; what were the social, political, literary and religious beliefs of the biblical authors; how has the biblical text been interpreted by both Jews and Christians for the past 2,000 years; and how have these interpretations influenced modern beliefs about the Bible.

THRS 203 The Quest for God (Core: CI)
In its most basic sense, theology is talk about God.  This course investigates the Christian tradition’s quest to speak rightly about God by exploring the historical development of the Trinitarian doctrine as well as engaging contemporary understandings of God.  It gives attention to currents of feminist, liberationist, and process models for God as well as concepts of God in a post-modern, religiously plural world.  Theology and Religious Studies majors/minors should take THRS 209: Doctrine of God for major/minor requirement.

THRS 209 Doctrine of God
In its most basic sense, theology is talk about God. This course investigates the Christian tradition’s “God talk” by exploring the historical development of doctrines of God as well as engaging contemporary images and concepts of God, giving attention to currents of feminist, liberationist, process, and post-modernist understandings of God.

THRS / AMER 221 Religion in America (Core: DD)
Examines the historical development of religious movements in America, both mainstream and peripheral groups, and analyzes the religious perceptions by which Americans have viewed themselves as a nation and culture, including a contemporary assessment.

THRS 242 Liturgy and the Sacraments
This course examines the nature of the liturgy and the sacraments as the forum in which the Church expresses and forms its identity and mission in the world. The course examines the historical evolution of the seven traditional sacraments as well as the other major rites of the Church. Finally, the course explores the implications of the reformed liturgy for Christian life and ministry in the contemporary world.

THRS 255 / PHIL 250 Philosophy of Religion (Core: WT)
This course examines the rational assessment of religious beliefs and concepts and arguments used in their support. The course considers contemporary challenges to belief in God and the responses to these challenges.

THRS / PHIL 265 Asian Philosophy and Religion (Core: BB)
A study of the major philosophical and religious traditions of South and East Asia. The course emphasizes the Hindu and Buddhist traditions. The ethical, metaphysical, and epistemological aspects of each major tradition are covered. Spring semester.

THRS / WMGS 268 Sexuality, Intimacy and God
This course explores the meaning and significance of sexuality and sex for human fulfillment. It examines the ethics of intimate and sexual relationships in light of Christian theological and scriptural traditions as well as reason (including social and scientific sources) and contemporary human experience. Specific topics under examination include “hookup culture” on contemporary college campuses; the social construction of gender and sexual expression; unmarried sexuality; same-sex relations; contraception; abortion; and sexual violence. Students engage various theological, philosophical, natural and social science sources, including imagery in the popular media, traditional Roman Catholic teaching, “revisionist” theological perspectives, and feminist insights regarding the body, sex, and human relationships more generally.

THRS 280 Introducing Christian Traditions
This course examines the history of Christianity in its theological, social and institutional dimensions, from the New Testament era to the present. This development is studied in a variety of historical and cultural contexts, presenting through representative figures and issues both continuity and diversity in Christian thought and life in the midst of society. This course prepares theology and religious studies majors/minors for more advanced courses in the theology and religious studies curriculum.

THRS 302 Forgotten and Found Sacred Texts (Adv. Core: BB)
This course examines the fascinating stories surrounding the loss and rediscovery of significant text collections in the history of Judaism and Christianity, for example, the Cairo Genizah, the Oxyrhynchus Papyri, the Aleppo Codex, and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Each of these collections played a significant role in their respective communities and their rediscovery in the modern era reveals much about contemporary scholarship in general and particularly the impact of colonialism and orientalism in the encounter between Western scholars of Judaism and Christianity and Middle Eastern cultures. Spring semester, alternate years.

THRS 309 Biblical Exegesis and Research
This course introduces students to both historical-critical and post-modernist methods in academic biblical research. Students will learn the assumptions behind these methods, their usefulness to biblical interpretation, and how to use them. Theology and religious studies majors/minors only.

THRS 310 Marriage and Family as Vocation (Adv. Core: CI)
This course explores the moral and religious dimensions of marriage and family, with particular attention to resources within the Catholic Christian tradition. It will address such questions as: what does it mean to place the marriage commitment and the wider commitment to the family in the context of a relationship to God; what does it mean to consider marriage a vocation and sacrament; how does the vocation of marriage develop over time; how do careers, children, aging parents and other obligations affect the marriage relationship; what does it take to sustain a lifelong martial commitment in our culture; and what are the distinct characteristics and responsibilities of Christian family life.

THRS 312 Church: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (Adv. Core: CI)
This course explores the nature and mission of the Church from the early Christian communities to the present day. Special attention will be given to the theology of the Church that emerged from the Second Vatican Council, especially the essential communal nature of Christianity. Attention will also be given to challenges that confront the Church today, including issues of sexuality, women in the Church, celibacy, and how the Church is called both to witness to and to be challenged by society.

THRS 314 The Origins of Biblical Monotheism (Adv. Core: CI)
The course will trace the development from the polytheistic religions of the ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean worlds and the multiple origins of ancient theological and philosophical critiques of those beliefs which in turn led to the belief in a single deity, understood in various ways. Careful attention will be given to the rationales used to both support and undermine long-held religious systems along with the ongoing development in the understanding of a single supreme being.

THRS 315 Mary Through the Ages
This course will be an examination of the figure of the Virgin Mary, as she has been experienced by Christians (and some non-Christians) for the last two millennia. We will study the development of her cult by examining canonical and non-canonical scripture, Mary in art, the development of Marian doctrine and dogma in the Catholic Church, Mary’s role in Protestantism and Islam, Marian apparitions, and Mary as a figure of liberation and oppression. The course will also include a field trip to the recently approved Marian apparition site in Champion, Wis. As a major focus of Christian life and devotion, examining the figure of Mary and the role she has played in the lives of believers is an important part of understanding the Christian tradition.

THRS 316 Who is Jesus? (Adv. Core: CI)
An attempt to answer the biblical question “And who do you say that I am?” is a central issue of theology. This course looks at today’s answers formulated in continuity with scripture and tradition but shaped in the light of contemporary culture and experience.

THRS / WMGS 318 Feminist Theology (Adv. Core: CI)
This course introduces students to feminist theology as a theology of liberation, examines its foundations in feminist theory and Christian revisionist sources and explores its contributions to the Christian, especially the Catholic, faith tradition.

THRS 320 The Christian Tradition (Adv. Core: CI)
This course examines the history of Christianity in its theological, social and institutional dimensions, from the New Testament era to the present. This development is studied in a variety of historical and cultural contexts, presenting through representative figures and issues both continuity and diversity in Christian thought and life in the midst of society. For non-Theology and Religious Studies majors/minors only.

THRS 322 Survey of the Hebrew Bible (Adv. Core: CI)
The Hebrew Bible is an intriguing mix of unity and diversity, due mostly to the fact that it is a composite literary collection that draws together numerous independent tales and narrative fragments. Beyond this, in the pages of the Hebrew Bible one also finds three important relationships. First, because the Old Testament is both ancient Near Eastern literature and a Scripture for present day Jews and Christians, there is the relationship between the past and the present. Second, because the Hebrew Bible is the object of scholarly study and an integral part of religious belief, there is also the relationship between the academy and communities of faith. Third, because the Hebrew Bible, although part of the Christian Bible, was written by non-Christians many years before the birth of Jesus and today functions as the sacred scriptures of two distinct religious traditions, there is the relationship between Judaism and Christianity.

THRS / WMGS 324 Women in the Bible (Adv. Core: CI)
This course uncovers the untold and often troubling stories about women in the world of biblical literature. The material provokes thought and dialogue regarding the biblical writers’ perspectives on gender, sexuality and personhood. Students will be encouraged to think honestly and courageously about their own assumptions regarding authority and identity and participation in unjust social systems. Students will learn new methodologies to analyze gender and sexuality in order to rethink long-held social norms. Throughout the course, students will regularly reflect on how biblical representations impact the roles of women and men in contemporary society.

THRS 325 Providence, Suffering and Freedom (Adv. Core: CI)
This course examines various possibilities for making sense of the traditional Christian belief in an omnipotent, all-loving, providential God in light of the contemporary awareness of the immensity and tragedy of human suffering and the growing recognition of the depth and radicalness of human freedom.

THRS / CLAS 327 Ancient Wisdom and the Modern Search for Meaning (Adv. Core: CI)
What is the good life? What can a person truly know? Is there justice in the world? These are some of the fundamental, universal questions of the human condition. This course will raise these questions and look at how the biblical wisdom literature answers them along with similar writings from elsewhere in the ancient world as well as modern literature and film. As a result of this analysis, students will have the opportunity to construct a coherent and viable structure of meaning for their own life journeys.

THRS 329 The New Testament
This course examines the writings of the New Testament and the creation of those texts within the context of Second Temple Judaism and the larger Greco-Roman world. Students will consider the canonical New Testament, in addition to select non-canonical writings, and the larger question of why certain texts were canonized and others were not. Students will develop skills in close reading of biblical texts, engagement with the traditions and contributions of critical biblical scholarship, including the principles of Catholic biblical interpretation, and the process of contextualizing biblical texts in the social, political, and religious environment of the Greco-Roman world.

THRS 331 Judaism and Christianity: The Holocaust (Adv. Core: CI)
The examination of the historical and contemporary relation of Jews and Christians, through a study of critical events, comparative literature, and correlated theologies, in an analysis which recognizes both interrelated unity and tragic antagonism. In line with Catholic teaching on the Shoah, the course strives to create a deeper understanding of the interrelated causes of genocides in general, and the Holocaust in particular. Students should become more aware of the relationship between religious discourse and its political and social ties, as well as the complicity of all human beings in unjust social structures.

THRS 333 Christian Ethics (Adv. Core: CI)
This course explores the connection between being a Christian and being a morally responsible person. It addresses foundational questions of ethics in light of the Christian narrative, such as: what kind of people should we be; what should we do; and what sort of communities should we construct. It therefore focuses on three dynamic, interdependent dimensions of morality: character, choices and community. Some applied ethical issues will be examined. Theology and religious studies majors/minors sign up for THRS 433.

THRS 337 Character and the Moral Life (Adv. Core: CI)
This course examines the relationship between morality, happiness, and the good life by focusing on the qualities of character that are necessary for human flourishing, especially the virtues. Special attention is given to the cardinal virtues of prudence, justice, temperance and fortitude, as well as the theological virtues of faith, hope and charity. The second half of the course explores the seven capital vices that are most detrimental for human well-being: envy, vainglory, sloth, greed, anger, gluttony and lust. Prerequisite: THRS 117.

THRS 338 Religion and Literature: Christian Mysticism
This course will involve reading mystical literature of the Christian tradition in order to understand this important dimension of Christian theology and experience. Through extensive reading of a wide range of primary documents across many eras, students will be able to explore this important, but often overlooked, dimension of the Christian tradition.

THRS 339 World Scriptures (Adv. Core: BB)
This course examines the role and contents of normative religious texts in some of the major religions of the world (e.g., Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism). Students will be introduced to the different ways that authoritative religious texts are viewed by their adherents, understand how their authority is exercised in their respective traditions, and read a good portion of primary sources from these different traditions.

THRS 340 World Religions in Dialogue (Adv. Core: BB)
This course offers a critical and comparative introduction to the world’s non-Christian and mostly non-Western religious traditions. Focusing on Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Judaism, Islam and several indigenous religions as well as new religious movements, the course investigates and compares these traditions with special attention given to contexts. A key component of this course involves examining the phenomenon of globalization and the issues of diversity and interaction between traditions.

THRS 343 Prophet and Savior: Muslim and Christian Theologies in Dialogue (Adv. Core: BB)
The Prophet Muhammad and Jesus Christ occupy central places in the theological imaginations of the Muslim and Christian traditions.  These figures also raise important theological issues and questions for interreligious dialogue between Muslims and Christians.  In this course, students will explore theologies of the Prophet and the Savior from within the traditions as well as theologies that emerge between the traditions.  They will also master theories of and models for interreligious dialogue and critically consider the significance of interreligious dialogue for their own theological self-understanding.

THRS 350 Christianity and Religious Diversity (Adv. Core: CI)
In what ways is Christian, theological self-understanding informed by encountering non-Christian religions? This course investigates both aspects of the question with particular attention to themes such as cosmopolitanism, hybridity, pluralism and relativism. First, students examine Christian theological resources — both traditional and emerging — for understanding religious diversity. Secondly they explore the development, beliefs, and practices of the Hindu, Buddhist and Islamic traditions. Students draw on the Christian theological framework to answer constructively questions about the relationship between Christianity and these religious groups.

THRS 355 Theology of Spirituality (Adv. Core: CI)
This course is an introductory exploration of the theology of prayer and the spiritual life, it explores the realm of religious faith and the various means by which humans enter into an explicit relationship with God. Students will be exposed to the various schools of Christian spirituality as they have arisen in the history of the Christian community. In addition, class sessions will be devoted to discussing the relationships of spirituality with the human condition.

THRS 360 Exploring Catholic Theology (Adv. Core: CI)
This course is an introduction to Catholic theology in light of the Second Vatican Council. It will examine developments in Catholic theologies of God, Christ, the Church, the sacraments and especially the fundamental elements of Catholic morality.

THRS 361 Catholic Intellectual Tradition (Adv. Core: CI)
This course identifies the central distinguishing characteristics of the Catholic intellectual tradition. It examines the impact of the tradition in art, literature, philosophy and science. Finally, the course entails a critical appraisal of the distinctiveness of the Catholic intellectual tradition and an evaluation of its unique accomplishments and shortcomings.

THRS 389 Special Topics
This course is an in-depth study of one or more major issues confronting contemporary religion. Students are challenged to make concrete applications of the role of theology and religious practice in issues of the early 21st century and to evaluate the impact of the heritage and tradition on their own thinking and on society in general. Topics will change from semester to semester but may include such issues as the Holocaust, nuclear weapons, abortion, racism and church-state relations.

THRS 400 Christology
This course examines the varied responses to the biblical question “And who do you say that I am?”  It explores contemporary approaches formulated in conversation with scripture and tradition but shaped in the light of contemporary culture and experience. Prerequisite: THRS 117. Spring semester, alternate years.

THRS 433 Christian Ethics (Adv. Core: CI)
This course explores the connection between being a Christian and being a morally responsible person. It attends to foundational questions of ethics in light of the Christian narrative, such as: What kind of people should we be? What should we do? What sort of communities should we construct? It therefore focuses on three dynamic, interdependent dimensions of morality: character, choices and community. Some applied ethical issues will be examined. Prerequisite: Theology and Religious Studies major/minor.

THRS 460 Advanced Seminar
This course offers senior theology and religious studies majors and minors the opportunity to engage in a research project on a special topic, theme or theologian. Spring semester.

THRS 490 Independent Study (2 or 4 credits)
A course allowing staff and students to explore together topics of special interest. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and approval of the associate dean of humanities.

THRS 494 Internship
This course is an action/reflection experience for those seeking skills in ministry. Students are placed in the local community. In addition to regular weekly service, students are required to meet each week in a supervised class with an instructor from the Theology and Religious Studies faculty. In those meetings, students explore the bases of practical theology, as that science reflects on the pastoral experience.

Women’s and Gender Studies

WMGS 110 Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies (Core: DD)
This introductory course will focus on one central question: What difference does gender make? By examining a variety of texts (articles, novels, film, popular culture), we will learn not only how to analyze issues of power, gender and identity, but we will also relate those issues to the wider world around us. Specific thematic units include socialization, violence, work, the female body, language, sexuality, motherhood and the family, race, globalization, and voices from the third wave of feminism.

WMGS / ENGL 206 Sexuality and Literature: Lesbian, Gay and Transgender Texts
When Lord Alfred Douglas famously said, “I am the love that dare not speak its name,” he articulated a conundrum in gay identity — How do you tell your story when it is unspeakable? This introduction to the lesbian, gay and transgender tradition in literature tackles this question among others. The course focuses on 20th-century U.S. texts, examining how sexual identity, along with race, class and gender, changed over the course of the 20th century.

WMGS / THRS 268 Sexuality, Intimacy and God
This course explores the meaning and significance of sexuality and sex for human fulfillment. It examines the ethics of intimate and sexual relationships in light of Christian theological and scriptural traditions as well as reason (including social and scientific sources) and contemporary human experience. Specific topics under examination include the “hookup culture” on contemporary college campuses; the social construction of gender and sexual expression; unmarried sexuality; same-sex relations; contraception; abortion; and sexual violence. Students engage various theological, philosophical, natural and social science sources, including imagery in the popular media, traditional Roman Catholic teaching, “revisionist” theological perspectives, and feminist insights regarding the body, sex, and human relationships more generally.

WMGS / INTL 300 Contemporary Latin American Literature and Culture (Core: BB)
This course covers Latin American literature and culture of the 20th and 21st centuries across a variety of mediums, including film, music, telenovelas, pop culture, social media, news and current events, as well as comics and graphic novels, short stories, poetry, and novels, among others. The course will be structured around the following themes: Indigenous and Afro-Latinx communities; the Latin American Boom and Post-Boom; Latin American dictatorships and U.S.-Latin American relations; and Immigration and the U.S. Latinx experience. We will pay particular attention to the history of European colonialism and its legacies; U.S. socio-economic imperialism; and the intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, and citizenship. Spring semester.

WMGS / ENGL 310 Race and Sex in Contemporary U.S. Texts
This course examines race and ethnicity in American-Indian, Latino, African-American and Asian-American texts in the contemporary United States (1960s to present). The course investigates recurrent issues like immigration, memory and identity, and the legacy of slavery, as we understand the political and cultural underpinnings of the texts. Writers include Louise Erdrich, Sherman Alexie, Junot Diaz, Sandra Cisneros, Toni Morrison, Walter Mosley, Gish Jen and Don Lee. This course meets the Literature and Cultural Diversity requirement for English majors with secondary education certification. Spring semester. 

WMGS /ENGL / AMER 311 Women and Literature
Exploring literary texts by women, we will examine how the construction of “woman,” sex and gender has changed over time and investigate how it intersects with issues of race, class, sexuality, and nation. By using feminist literary theory, we will engage with the most pressing issues in the field, from early ideas of a particular women’s literary voice to contemporary claims that challenge female authorship altogether. Special topics may include contemporary women writers, gender and the 19th-century novel, and ethnic women writers. Authors may include Virginia Woolf, Adrienne Rich, Gloria Anzaldua, Audre Lorde, Bharati Mukherjee, Dorothy Allison, Edwidge Danticat and Marjane Satrapi. Alternate years.

WMGS / THRS 318 Feminist Theology (Adv. Core: CI)
This course introduces students to feminist theology as a theology of liberation, examines its foundations in feminist theory and Christian revisionist sources and explores its contributions to the Christian, especially the Catholic, faith tradition.

WMGS / THRS 324 Women in the Bible (Adv. Core: CI) 
This course uncovers the untold and often troubling stories about women in the world of biblical literature. The material provokes thought and dialogue regarding the biblical writers’ perspectives on gender, sexuality and personhood. Students will be encouraged to think honestly and courageously about their own assumptions regarding authority and identity and participation in unjust social systems. Students will learn new methodologies to analyze gender and sexuality in order to rethink long-held social norms. Throughout the course, students will regularly reflect on how biblical representations impact the roles of women and men in contemporary society.

WMGS / AMER / HIST 327 Women and Gender in United States History
This course will explore women and gender in American history from colonial America to the present. We will examine how gender norms changed throughout history, and how individuals interacted with those norms. We will analyze how women and notions about gender shaped American politics: through cultural trends like fashion; through family and daily life; and through social movements such as suffrage, temperance, and welfare rights. We will ask, when did gender constrict the choices that individuals faced, and when did individuals expand and even disassemble gender norms? Alternate years.

WMGS / COME 331 Gender and Media
Why are some genres of media labeled as feminine or masculine? How are men and women represented in media? What impacts do these representations have on media viewers? This course will explore these questions and more from multiple scholarly perspectives. Various forms of media such as advertising, television, movies, video games, and news will be considered. Fall semester.

WMGS / HIST 335 Women and Work
This course examines the topic of women and work historically, with attention to change over time in the work histories of African and American women. Throughout this course students will explore women’s working lives in the context of the gendered social norms within which they have lived. Within this general framework, the course will examine types of occupations such as domestic work, prostitution, farming, agricultural work, market trading and professional/managerial work. The course will also explore the intersections of work with marriage and parenting and the effects of race and class upon women’s working lives. Alternate years.

WMGS / SOCI 346 Intersections of Privilege (Adv. Core: DD)
This course engages in an interdisciplinary and multimedia examination of social inequality, focusing on the complex and intersecting ways that social groups gain advantage over and marginalize others. Students will examine topics including race (whiteness), sexuality (heterosexuality), gender (masculinity), class (economic and cultural capital), and nationality (global privilege associated with first-world status). This course will integrate perspectives on how privilege is reinforced in day-to-day interactions as well as in larger social structures.

WMGS / HIST 351 Women, Gender and Imperialism
Western women played significant roles in British colonies in Africa and India in the fields of education, public health and missionary work. These woman believed that they could improve the lives of non-Western women by acculturating them to middle-class, Western and Christian norms. The course will explore how these women tried to reshape key social institutions in Africa and India such as marriage, parenting, medical practices and religion. This course will also explore how the women and men these individuals came to “civilize” in turn shaped the cross-cultural encounter through their powerful reactions to the often unwelcome acculturating messages they received. Spring semester, alternate years.

WMGS 360 Feminist Theory
This course takes a sociology of knowledge approach to the development of feminist theory from the 18th century to the present. The variety of modern and postmodern feminist theories are placed in social, political and historical context. Primary source examples of each school of thought are read, applied and evaluated. Because feminist thought has been a response to the conditions of women throughout history, women’s oppression at various points in history will be covered. Prerequisite: instructor’s consent. Alternate years.

WMGS / SOCI 361 Gender, Sexuality and Society
While gender and sexuality often appear natural, this course investigates their social roots. Throughout the semester, we will explore the diverse ways in which gender and sexuality have been conceptualized, embodied, shaped, policed, and transformed. Additionally, we will examine the relationship between gender, sexuality, inequality, and major social institutions including education, media, work, and family. Finally, we explore the intersections of gender, sexuality, race, and class as they relate to a variety of contemporary issues and controversies, including “hooking up,” marriage laws, gender reassignment surgery, and sex education.

WMGS / ART 375 Race and Gender in Contemporary Art (Adv. Core: DD)
A survey of how artists explore and express personal identity, unique bias and social marginalization and how contemporary art reflects society's evolving and changing attitudes toward matters of life, love and death.

WMGS 289 / 389 / 489 Special Topics (2 or 4 credits)
A study of a single topic of special interest to students. When the course is offered, the topic will be listed in the timetable of courses.

WMGS 490 Independent Study (2 or 4 credits)
This course allows staff and students to explore together topics of special interest. Prerequisite: approval of the women’s and gender studies advisory committee.

WMGS 494 Internship in Women's and Gender Studies
This internship experience allows students to apply their studies in a supervised work situation. Students benefit from an inside look at different kinds of organizations by having a chance to work in their field of study and by gaining experience with state-of-the-art equipment and practices. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing and instructor’s consent.

World Literature

WOLT 210 Soviet Dissident Literature (Core: EI)
This course explores 20th century Soviet culture and society through readings of Soviet dissident literature. Besides a close reading of the literary texts, considerable attention is devoted to the history of the Soviet period, Soviet ideology, Russian culture in the former Soviet Union and abroad, and contemporary Soviet society. Authors who may be studied include Zamiatin, Babel, Olesha, Solzhenitsyn, Bulgakov, Pasternak and Brovdsky.

WOLT 320 Nineteenth-Century Russian Fiction (Adv. Core: WT)
This course serves as an introduction to 19th century Russian literature seen within its historical and cultural contexts. After a brief survey of Russian history and literature from the Kievan Period through the 18th century, the course concentrates on famous short stories and novels by Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov. These works will be examined not only as literary masterpieces, but also in terms of the ethical and value questions they raise. Students will write critical essays, take essay examinations, and read additional material helpful to understanding Russian literature as a major part of 19th century European culture.

WOLT / CLAS 325 Classical Mythology (Adv. Core: WT)
This course will study both Greek and Roman mythology in their literary and cultural contexts. The course will consider the meanings, purposes and universality of various myths, such as the stories of Prometheus, Orpheus, Oedipus and Aeneas. It may also include comparative elements, touching, for example, Norse, Celtic and American Indian myths.

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