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College Credit Program Schools

St. Norbert’s College Credit Program (CCP) started in 1963. It is a concurrent or dual enrollment partnership with fifteen participating high schools. Each course covers the same content, has the same expectations and awards the same credit as courses taught on the St. Norbert College campus. Master-degreed high school faculty, who have been approved by corresponding college departments, teach the classes.

CCP is a great opportunity for your students to explore the pace of college before graduating from high school. They can take college classes as high school students to expose themselves to college course work, and to give themselves a competitive edge for minimal costs.

The course fee for the 2017-18 school year is $180 per 4-credit course. Fees are subject to change. Students are responsible for payment of CCP fees to their school. The schools then transfer the fees to St. Norbert College.

Potential Schools

How to Partner With the College Credit Program at St. Norbert College
The administration at a high school may request a CCP course be established on the high school campus. The first step is to determine if there is a faculty member at the high school who meets the minimum requirements. Potential new instructors should forward the appropriate documents (updated resume/ C.V. and copies of undergraduate and graduate college transcripts) to the Program Director for review. These will be forwarded to the discipline faculty liaison.The faculty liaison will then confer with his or her discipline colleagues for final recommendation.

If approved, new CCP instructors and their principals are notified in writing as to their approval to teach a dual-credit course.

High School Instructor Requirements
To be eligible to teach in the College Credit Program, instructors must have the following:

  • Master’s degree or higher in discipline or content area taught or
  • Any Master's degree and be working toward a minimum of 18 graduate credit hours in the discipline or content area taught

Current College Credit Program Offerings at High Schools in Wisconsin and Michigan

School ENGL 101 ENGL 150 MATH 131 MATH 132 LEAD 100
Denmark High School
X


Elkhart Lake High School

X

X




Hilbert High School

X

X




Kettle Moraine High School

 

 



X

Lourdes Academy

X

X



 

Marinette High School

X

X



X

Munising High School

X X

 

Neenah High School

 

 

 

 

X

Notre Dame Academy

X

X

X

X


Pulaski High School

X

X

X X

Seymour High School

X

X




Shiocton High School

X

X



X

St. Thomas Aquinas Academy





X

West De Pere High School

X

X

X



Xavier High School

X

X

X



College Credit Course Descriptions & Learning Outcomes

ENGL 101 English Composition (Core: WI)
4 credits semester-long
This course introduces the basics of college-level writing. Students will learn effective strategies of argumentation, including: creating a coherent claim or thesis; analyzing and responding to others’ arguments; handling and citing evidence; and adapting written work to different audiences and subjects. Students will also learn how to make their ideas clear and coherent at the level of sentence, paragraph and document. Writing assignments may be on a variety of topics and students should expect to draft and revise their writing. ENGL 101 does not fulfill an English major requirement.

Upon completion of ENGL 101, students will be able to:

  1. Offer a thesis that is contestable, supportable with available evidence and conceptually specific.
  2. Defend that thesis using coherent reasoning and appropriate evidence. 
  3. Consider objections and alternative viewpoints.
  4. Use sources of information appropriately.
  5. Organize their writing clearly at the level of document and of paragraph.
  6. Display competency in basic mechanics—punctuation, spelling, grammar.

ENGL 150 Introduction to Literary Studies (Core: EI, WI)
4 credits Semester-long
In this course, students cultivate an appreciation for literature and develop the skills of close reading and analysis of selected works from the genres of poetry, fiction, drama and nonfiction prose according to the various principles and techniques of literary criticism.

Upon completion of ENGL 150, students will be able to:

  1. Distinguish between the major types of literary writing: poetry, prose, and drama.
  2. Offer a thesis appropriate for the field of literary studies.
  3. Provide convincing close readings of literary texts to defend that thesis.
  4. Find and use sources appropriate for literary studies.
  5. Consider alternative interpretations.
  6. Develop a clear voice and style that is appropriate for literary studies.
  7. Display competency in basic mechanics—punctuation, spelling, grammar.

LEAD 100 Leadership Theory and Practice 
4 credits Semester-long or year-long
Introduces and acquaints students with the history of leadership studies, past and current leadership theories and styles, and their practical implementation in the daily operational activities in the fields of health studies, engineering/manufacturing, international business or education. The course focuses on definitional issues (What is leadership?) and explanations (How does it work?). At the end of the course students are expected to demonstrate basic knowledge in various approaches, frameworks and activities of leadership theory, particularly within their chosen field of study and be able to give practical examples of leadership within those fields. 

Upon completion of LEAD 100, students should be able to:

  1. Understand that leadership is a process, a skill, a commitment, and an action. 
  2. Develop comfort in considering the theoretical underpinnings when observing leadership in action.
  3. Assess the credibility of leadership studies scholarship and key scholars in the field.
  4. Be exposed to different local leaders and their concepts and philosophies of leadership.

MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 1 (Core: QR) 4 credits Year-long
Pre-calculus mathematics will be presumed but reviewed as needed. Topics include limits and continuity of functions; the derivative, its meaning, computation and applications; the definite integral, its meaning, computation and applications; differentiation and integration of logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric functions; and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Prerequisite: four years of college preparatory math in high school, MATH 115, or through CCP math placement test. Note: students may not receive credit for both MATH 124 and MATH 131.

MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 2 (Core: QR) 4 credits Year-long
Topic include applications of integration, methods of integration, indeterminate forms and improper integrals, elementary differential equations, and series. Prerequisite: MATH 131 or MATH 124. 

Upon completion, students will be able to
  1. Identify whether or not a one sided or two sided limit exists both analytically and graphically. Identify the three behaviors that cause a limit not to exist (oscillation, unboundedness, and mismatched one-sided limits) both analytically and graphically. Describe the end behavior and asymptotes of functions given graphically or as an equation in terms of limits involving ∞. Define continuity in terms of graphical information and limit statements. Identify whether or not functions are continuous at a point given a graph or an analytic definition. If the function is not continuous at the point, they will be able to identify the type of discontinuity (jump, removable, or infinite). vi. Draw the graph of a function with given properties described in terms of continuity or limit statements, including those involving ∞. Understand and use the Intermediate Value Theorem and the Extreme Value Theorem.  Understand and use the Sandwich/Squeeze theorem when given functions which meet its hypothesis.
  2. Interpret the derivative as the rate of change of a function, both at a specific input and as a function in its own right. Understand the definition of the derivative both graphically and analytically. Interpret limits as derivatives when they are in the appropriate algebraic form. Understand the relationship between continuity and differentiability.  Understand the relationship between the slope of the tangent line of a function at a point and the slope of the tangent line at the corresponding point on the inverse function. Memorize and use the derivatives of standard functions when needed.Use the product, quotient, chain, and power rules to find the derivative of a function. Implicitly differentiate functions and equations, including using logarithmic differentiation when appropriate. Solve related rates problems.  Solve optimization problems. Solve problems using the the relationship between the position, velocity, and acceleration functions. Linearly approximate a function. Identify local and global extrema, critical points, inflection points, intervals where a function is increasing/decreasing, and intervals where a function’s graph has consistent concavity both graphically and analytically. Understand and use the Mean Value Theorem.
  3. Understand the definition of the definite integral analytically and geometrically. Understand and use the basic properties of the definite integral, including additivity and linearity. Understand the value of the definite integral of the rate of change of a quantity as the change in the original quantity.  Understand that the indefinite integral refers to a function’s antiderivative(s) and write this using the usual notation.  Know antiderivatives of standard functions including polynomials, exponentials, logarithms, and trigonometric functions.  Use the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to compute the value of a definite integral. Use geometric area formulas to compute the value of definite integrals when the relevant region is a familiar geometric shape. Use u-substitution to compute indefinite and definite integrals. Find the area between curves. Find the volume of a solid of revolution using disks, washers, and shells. Solve initial value problems, including those related to position, velocity, and acceleration. Compute the length of the graph of a function.

 

For further information, please contact the College Credit Program office at 920-403-4075.

Current Schools

2017-18 Important Dates for CCP Instructors

Sept. 28, 2017 at 4 p.m.

2017-18 annual teacher’s meeting in the Hendrickson Dining Room of the Bemis International Center

Oct./Nov. 2017

The CCP director will visit all CCP classrooms to verify student information, and give directions for transcript processing.

Feb. 2018

Gather applicant’s transcripts, administer pre-tests. First semester grades and second semester rosters due to CCP office

March/April 2018

Mathematics teachers administer final exams and assist seniors in sending transcript requests

May/June 2018

All full-year and second semester grades are due to CCP office.

Important Resources for Current Instructors

As a College Credit instructor, you and your students have full access to all online and printed materials through our St. Norbert College Mulva Library.

Potential Schools

How to Partner With the College Credit Program at St. Norbert College
The administration at a high school may request a CCP course be established on the high school campus. The first step is to determine if there is a faculty member at the high school who meets the minimum requirements. Potential new instructors should forward the appropriate documents (updated resume/ C.V. and copies of undergraduate and graduate college transcripts) to the Program Director for review. These will be forwarded to the discipline faculty liaison.The faculty liaison will then confer with his or her discipline colleagues for final recommendation.

If approved, new CCP instructors and their principals are notified in writing as to their approval to teach a dual-credit course.

High School Instructor Requirements
To be eligible to teach in the College Credit Program, instructors must have the following:

  • Master’s degree or higher in discipline or content area taught or
  • Any Master's degree and be working toward a minimum of 18 graduate credit hours in the discipline or content area taught

Current College Credit Program Offerings at High Schools in Wisconsin and Michigan

School ENGL 101 ENGL 150 MATH 131 MATH 132 LEAD 100
Denmark High School
X


Elkhart Lake High School

X

X




Hilbert High School

X

X




Kettle Moraine High School

 

 



X

Lourdes Academy

X

X



 

Marinette High School

X

X



X

Munising High School

X X

 

Neenah High School

 

 

 

 

X

Notre Dame Academy

X

X

X

X


Pulaski High School

X

X

X X

Seymour High School

X

X




Shiocton High School

X

X



X

St. Thomas Aquinas Academy





X

West De Pere High School

X

X

X



Xavier High School

X

X

X



College Credit Course Descriptions & Learning Outcomes

ENGL 101 English Composition (Core: WI)
4 credits semester-long
This course introduces the basics of college-level writing. Students will learn effective strategies of argumentation, including: creating a coherent claim or thesis; analyzing and responding to others’ arguments; handling and citing evidence; and adapting written work to different audiences and subjects. Students will also learn how to make their ideas clear and coherent at the level of sentence, paragraph and document. Writing assignments may be on a variety of topics and students should expect to draft and revise their writing. ENGL 101 does not fulfill an English major requirement.

Upon completion of ENGL 101, students will be able to:

  1. Offer a thesis that is contestable, supportable with available evidence and conceptually specific.
  2. Defend that thesis using coherent reasoning and appropriate evidence. 
  3. Consider objections and alternative viewpoints.
  4. Use sources of information appropriately.
  5. Organize their writing clearly at the level of document and of paragraph.
  6. Display competency in basic mechanics—punctuation, spelling, grammar.

ENGL 150 Introduction to Literary Studies (Core: EI, WI)
4 credits Semester-long
In this course, students cultivate an appreciation for literature and develop the skills of close reading and analysis of selected works from the genres of poetry, fiction, drama and nonfiction prose according to the various principles and techniques of literary criticism.

Upon completion of ENGL 150, students will be able to:

  1. Distinguish between the major types of literary writing: poetry, prose, and drama.
  2. Offer a thesis appropriate for the field of literary studies.
  3. Provide convincing close readings of literary texts to defend that thesis.
  4. Find and use sources appropriate for literary studies.
  5. Consider alternative interpretations.
  6. Develop a clear voice and style that is appropriate for literary studies.
  7. Display competency in basic mechanics—punctuation, spelling, grammar.

LEAD 100 Leadership Theory and Practice 
4 credits Semester-long or year-long
Introduces and acquaints students with the history of leadership studies, past and current leadership theories and styles, and their practical implementation in the daily operational activities in the fields of health studies, engineering/manufacturing, international business or education. The course focuses on definitional issues (What is leadership?) and explanations (How does it work?). At the end of the course students are expected to demonstrate basic knowledge in various approaches, frameworks and activities of leadership theory, particularly within their chosen field of study and be able to give practical examples of leadership within those fields. 

Upon completion of LEAD 100, students should be able to:

  1. Understand that leadership is a process, a skill, a commitment, and an action. 
  2. Develop comfort in considering the theoretical underpinnings when observing leadership in action.
  3. Assess the credibility of leadership studies scholarship and key scholars in the field.
  4. Be exposed to different local leaders and their concepts and philosophies of leadership.

MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 1 (Core: QR) 4 credits Year-long
Pre-calculus mathematics will be presumed but reviewed as needed. Topics include limits and continuity of functions; the derivative, its meaning, computation and applications; the definite integral, its meaning, computation and applications; differentiation and integration of logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric functions; and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Prerequisite: four years of college preparatory math in high school, MATH 115, or through CCP math placement test. Note: students may not receive credit for both MATH 124 and MATH 131.

MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 2 (Core: QR) 4 credits Year-long
Topic include applications of integration, methods of integration, indeterminate forms and improper integrals, elementary differential equations, and series. Prerequisite: MATH 131 or MATH 124. 

Upon completion, students will be able to
  1. Identify whether or not a one sided or two sided limit exists both analytically and graphically. Identify the three behaviors that cause a limit not to exist (oscillation, unboundedness, and mismatched one-sided limits) both analytically and graphically. Describe the end behavior and asymptotes of functions given graphically or as an equation in terms of limits involving ∞. Define continuity in terms of graphical information and limit statements. Identify whether or not functions are continuous at a point given a graph or an analytic definition. If the function is not continuous at the point, they will be able to identify the type of discontinuity (jump, removable, or infinite). vi. Draw the graph of a function with given properties described in terms of continuity or limit statements, including those involving ∞. Understand and use the Intermediate Value Theorem and the Extreme Value Theorem.  Understand and use the Sandwich/Squeeze theorem when given functions which meet its hypothesis.
  2. Interpret the derivative as the rate of change of a function, both at a specific input and as a function in its own right. Understand the definition of the derivative both graphically and analytically. Interpret limits as derivatives when they are in the appropriate algebraic form. Understand the relationship between continuity and differentiability.  Understand the relationship between the slope of the tangent line of a function at a point and the slope of the tangent line at the corresponding point on the inverse function. Memorize and use the derivatives of standard functions when needed.Use the product, quotient, chain, and power rules to find the derivative of a function. Implicitly differentiate functions and equations, including using logarithmic differentiation when appropriate. Solve related rates problems.  Solve optimization problems. Solve problems using the the relationship between the position, velocity, and acceleration functions. Linearly approximate a function. Identify local and global extrema, critical points, inflection points, intervals where a function is increasing/decreasing, and intervals where a function’s graph has consistent concavity both graphically and analytically. Understand and use the Mean Value Theorem.
  3. Understand the definition of the definite integral analytically and geometrically. Understand and use the basic properties of the definite integral, including additivity and linearity. Understand the value of the definite integral of the rate of change of a quantity as the change in the original quantity.  Understand that the indefinite integral refers to a function’s antiderivative(s) and write this using the usual notation.  Know antiderivatives of standard functions including polynomials, exponentials, logarithms, and trigonometric functions.  Use the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to compute the value of a definite integral. Use geometric area formulas to compute the value of definite integrals when the relevant region is a familiar geometric shape. Use u-substitution to compute indefinite and definite integrals. Find the area between curves. Find the volume of a solid of revolution using disks, washers, and shells. Solve initial value problems, including those related to position, velocity, and acceleration. Compute the length of the graph of a function.

 

For further information, please contact the College Credit Program office at 920-403-4075.

Current Schools

2017-18 Important Dates for CCP Instructors

Sept. 28, 2017 at 4 p.m.

2017-18 annual teacher’s meeting in the Hendrickson Dining Room of the Bemis International Center

Oct./Nov. 2017

The CCP director will visit all CCP classrooms to verify student information, and give directions for transcript processing.

Feb. 2018

Gather applicant’s transcripts, administer pre-tests. First semester grades and second semester rosters due to CCP office

March/April 2018

Mathematics teachers administer final exams and assist seniors in sending transcript requests

May/June 2018

All full-year and second semester grades are due to CCP office.

Important Resources for Current Instructors

As a College Credit instructor, you and your students have full access to all online and printed materials through our St. Norbert College Mulva Library.

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