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Satisfactory Academic Progress

In order to receive and maintain financial assistance – scholarships, grants, waivers, exchanges, loans, and employment – you’re required to progress toward completion of your course of study. Your Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is monitored annually at the end of the spring term after spring grades are posted. Aid applications received after this timeframe are still subject to evaluation as part of award processing.

Satisfactory Academic Progress is measured in three ways:

  1. Qualitative – Cumulative grade point average.
  2. Quantitative (PACE) – Total of all credit-hours attempted versus credit-hours earned measured cumulatively throughout your enrollment at St. Norbert College (includes transfer credit-hours).
  3. Maximum Timeframe – The maximum time to complete a program.

Qualitative Standard 
You’re expected to maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average. Undergraduate students must maintain a 2.0 and Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 at the end of each spring term. If you have less than the noted cumulative grade point average, you’ll be placed on financial aid suspension.

Quantitative Standard (PACE)
PACE is measured annually at the end of the spring term and is required to ensure you’re completing your program of study within the maximum time frame. PACE is calculated by dividing cumulative credits successfully completed by cumulative credits attempted. You must have an overall completion rate of 67 percent. If you have less than a 67 percent completion rate, you’ll be placed on financial aid suspension. The office of financial aid uses standard rounding procedures where a 66.5 percent would be rounded to 67 percent. 

The following are considered when evaluating your quantitative and qualitative standards:

  • Withdrawals, incompletes and failed courses are considered as attempted credits, but not earned.
  • Transfer credits, including those received through approved study abroad or exchange agreements, do not count in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average, but they are included in the calculation of both attempted and earned credits.
  • A satisfactory or unsatisfactory grade received for satisfactory/unsatisfactory graded credits are considered attempted and earned. 
  • Audit courses are not considered as courses attempted or earned.
  • Repeat courses are counted for credit and will affect your cumulative grade point average.
  • Remedial courses are included in the calculation of both attempted and earned credits.


Maximum Time Frame
You won’t be eligible to receive financial aid if you attempt more than 150 percent of normal credits required for a degree. At St. Norbert, this means that an undergraduate student in a degree program requiring 128 credits for graduation will be eligible for financial aid for the first 192 credits attempted. A graduate student in a degree program requiring 32 credits for graduation will be eligible for financial aid for the first 48 credits attempted. All attempted credits are counted, including transfer courses.


Financial Aid Suspension
If you fail to meet the minimum Satisfactory Academic Progress requirements, you’ll be placed on financial aid suspension. While you’re on financial aid suspension, you’re NOT eligible to receive federal, state, or institutional financial aid, but you may still attend St. Norbert, unless you’ve been dismissed. 

SAP Notification
Notification will be provided by sending an email to your SNC email address. This notification will include instructions for appealing the loss of financial aid, as well as an Appeal Form.  

Financial Aid Reinstatement
In order for financial aid to be reinstated after financial aid suspension, you must meet the academic standard required without the use of financial aid or submit a written appeal.

Appeal Process
You may appeal the loss of financial aid in writing if extraordinary circumstances interfered with your ability to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress standards. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Medical emergency
  • Severe health issues
  • Death or serious illness of an immediate family member or close friend
  • Significant trauma in a students life that impaired a students emotional and/or physical health
  • Short term hardship
  • Difficulties balancing work, extra-curricular activities or family responsibilities.
  • Other significant extraordinary circumstances. 

The appeal should explain why you failed to meet standards and what has changed that will allow you to make standards in the future. Supporting documentation, such as statements from academic advisers, professors, professional health care workers, etc., may also be requested. The appeal will be reviewed by the office of financial aid. If the appeal is accepted, you’ll be placed on financial aid probation for one term or put on an academic plan.

Financial Aid Probation
If you successfully appeal financial aid suspension, you’ll be placed on financial aid probation for one term. During this one term of financial aid probation, you’ll be eligible to receive financial aid. However, during this probationary period, you must regain Satisfactory Academic Progress standards. Failure to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress will result in financial aid suspension.

Academic Plan
Students with a successful appeal may be placed on an academic plan if it’s not possible to regain Satisfactory Academic Progress in one term. An academic plan may vary in length, but will be evaluated each term to ensure you’re meeting the requirements of the established plan. If you fail to meet the requirements of the plan, you’ll be placed on financial aid suspension.

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