Mathematics is a discipline and art that is elegant and challenging, requiring ingenuity as well as logic to solve real-world problems.

Math Course Offerings

MATH 102 Basic Algebra (two credits)
Topics include numbers and their properties, operations with rational numbers, fundamental operations in algebra, linear equations in one variable, special products and factoring, algebraic fractions, systems of linear equations, exponents and radicals, quadratic equations. Required of students whose placement test indicates inadequate preparation in mathematics. A student who has received credit for MATH 115, MATH 123, MATH 124 or MATH 131 may not take MATH 102 for credit without the Registrar’s consent.

MATH 115 Pre-Calculus Mathematics – GS8
Primarily for students intending to take MATH 124 or MATH 131 but who need more preparation. Topics include basic concepts of set theory, algebraic operations, functions, systems of equations, exponents, logarithms, trigonometry and an introduction to graphing calculators. Prerequisite: advanced algebra in high school or MATH 102. A student who has received credit for MATH 124 or MATH 131 may not take MATH 115 for credit without the Registrar’s consent.

MATH 120 Numbers and Operations
Intended for Education majors, this course examines the mathematical content knowledge underlying the numbers and operations taught in elementary school. Students will explore content in the Common Core State Standards, such as place value; algorithms for addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division; and arithmetic properties of counting numbers, integers, fractions, and decimals. This course focuses on mathematical content, not teaching methods. Prerequisite: four years of college preparatory mathematics in high school or MATH 102.

MATH 123 Applications of Contemporary Mathematics – GS8 C-QR
This course is designed to help students recognize the place of mathematics and mathematical reasoning in society. Students will be given the opportunity to enhance their ability to see the relevance of mathematics behind many current and historical topics and to use mathematical techniques to address those topics. Integrated emphases include: mathematics in society, mathematical history, understanding mathematical information (charts, graphs, data), mathematical modeling. The core topics: mathematics of finance, logic, probability, statistics and counting techniques, graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or placement.

MATH 124 A Survey of Calculus – GS8 C-QR
Intended primarily for business students, this course provides a working knowledge of calculus in one semester. Topics include functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, differentiation and applications, integration and applications, and functions of several variables. Prerequisite: four years of college preparatory math in high school or MATH 115. Note: students may not receive credit for both MATH 124 and MATH 131.

MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 1 – GS8 C-QR
Pre-calculus mathematics will be presumed but reviewed as needed. Topics include limits and continuity of functions; the derivative, its meaning, computation and applications; the definite integral, its meaning, computation and applications; differentiation and integration of logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric functions; and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Prerequisite: four years of college preparatory math in high school or MATH 115. Note: students may not receive credit for both MATH 124 and MATH 131.

MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 2 – GS8 C-QR
Topics include applications of integration, methods of integration, indeterminate forms and improper integrals, elementary differential equations, and series. Prerequisite: MATH 131 or MATH 124.

MATH 212 Mathematical Applications for Upper Elementary and Middle School – C-QR
Intended for Education majors, this course examines the mathematics taught in upper elementary and middle schools. Students will explore topics recommended in the NCTM Standards, such as problem solving, reasoning, number relationships, number theory and probability. This course focuses on mathematical content, not teaching methods. Prerequisite: MATH 120.

MATH 220 Principles of Geometry – C-QR
Intended for Elementary Education majors, this course examines the geometry taught in elementary and middle school mathematics. Students will develop a deeper understanding of such topics as measurement including length, area and volume; similar and congruent figures; polygons; constructions; symmetry; rigid motion; the fundamental properties of Euclidean and other geometries; and problem solving with geometric applications. This course focuses on mathematical content, not teaching methods. Prerequisite: MATH 120.

MATH 233 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 3
Topics include parametric equations, polar coordinates, matrices and determinants, vectors and curves in two- and three- dimensional space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, further applications of differentiation and integration, and line integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 132.

MATH 250 Advanced Foundations of Mathematics
This course is intended to be a transition to abstract mathematics. Topics include logic, the axiomatic method and the nature of proof, sets, relations, functions and 1-1 correspondences, countability, and selected topics in discrete mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 132. Spring semester.

MATH 289 Special Topics
The course topic and title will be announced at the time the course is offered. This course is intended for students at the first-year/ sophomore level.

MATH 303 Linear Algebra
Topics include vector spaces and inner product spaces, linear transformations, matrices and determinants, and eigenvalue problems. Prerequisites: MATH 233 and MATH 250. Spring semester.

MATH 306 Abstract Algebra
Topics include groups, cyclic groups, permutation groups, quotient groups, Lagrange’s theorem, homomorphism theorems, rings, ideals, polynomial rings, elementary number theory, integral domains and fields. Prerequisite: MATH 250. Fall semester.

MATH 310 Differential Equations
Topics include solutions and applications of ordinary differential equations of types including separable variables, homogeneous, exact, linear and non-linear. Includes introduction to differential operators, variation of parameters, Laplace transforms, power series and numerical solutions. Prerequisite: MATH 233. Spring semester.

MATH 313 Mathematical Modeling
This course introduces the construction and investigation of mathematical models for real-world problems. Techniques explored involve dimensional analysis; difference, ordinary differential and partial differential equations; fixed point, stability, and phase plane analysis; deterministic and stochastic processes; and computer packages as needed. Applications may include, but are not limited to, mechanical vibrations, population dynamics, traffic flow, chemical kinetics, cell biology and geophysical fluid dynamics. Prerequisite: MATH 233. Fall semester, alternate years.

MATH 315 Numerical Analysis
This course introduces algorithms for numerical solutions to mathematical problems, error analysis and computer packages. Topics include power series, roots of equations, linear and nonlinear systems, numerical differentiation and integration, differential equations, interpolation and difference equations, and curve fitting. Prerequisites: CSCI 110 and MATH 233. Spring semester, alternate years.

MATH 317 Operations Research
Topics include linear programming, duality, sensitivity analysis, transportation and assignment problems. The course also deals with computer implementation of selected algorithms. Selected topics from the following: game theory, network analysis, integer programming and decision theory. Prerequisite: MATH 233. Fall semester, alternate years.

MATH 321 Probability and Statistics
Topics include probability, discrete and continuous random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, statistical inference and sample statistics, hypothesis testing and selection of procedures, and correlation and regression. Prerequisite: MATH 233. Spring semester.

MATH 350 Modern Geometry
Topics include postulational systems, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, and the role of geometry in the history of mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 250. Spring semester, alternate years.

MATH 355 Topology
Topics include metric spaces and general topological spaces, separation properties, compactness, connectedness, convergence, completeness, continuous functions and homeomorphisms. Prerequisite: MATH 250. Offered by special arrangement with a member of the mathematics faculty.

MATH 373 Real Analysis
Topics include introduction to the theory of functions of a real variable, topology, limits, continuity, differentiability, the Riemann integral, sequences and series. Prerequisites: MATH 233 and MATH 250. Fall semester, alternate years.

MATH 376 Complex Analysis
Topics include elementary functions of a complex variable, differentiation, topology, integration, calculus of residues and series. Prerequisites: MATH 233 and MATH 250. Fall semester, alternate years.

MATH 489 Special Topics
A course designed for the study of subject material of special interest. The organization, methodology and objectives of the course will be determined by the instructor. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor’s consent and junior or senior standing.

MATH 490 Independent Study
A course which allows a talented student to pursue an area of study on an individual basis, with consultation and evaluation. The objectives, organization, methodology and means of evaluation will be mutually agreed upon by a faculty member and the student. Prerequisites: instructor’s consent and junior or senior standing.

MATH 499 Senior Examination (0 Semester Credits)
This non-credit course consists of two, two-hour exams covering the various areas of mathematics in the undergraduate curriculum. One exam is a standardized national test, while the second exam is designed by the College’s Mathematics discipline. The purpose of these exams is to assess whether graduates of the program are achieving the outcomes of the major program. The results of these exams will help the mathematics discipline monitor and improve the program. Prerequisite: senior standing. Spring semester.

Faculty Highlight

Fluid mechanics figures in countless phenomena, from lung function to lake sedimentation. Terry Jo Leiterman (Mathematics) investigates both and brings fluid mechanics theory to life in a new lab on campus. The experiments she and her students perform there will contribute to scholarly understanding of the interplay between lake ecosystems and climate change. Their research could prove valuable to those exploring how changing carbon cycles influence climate.