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Medical College of Wisconsin to Explore Planning for School of Pharmacy

From Medical College of Wisconsin, September 25, 2014
by Maureen Mack, mmack@mcw.edu, 414-955-4744

The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) will explore the feasibility of opening a school of pharmacy. A feasibility study will include several considerations related to an immersive three-year curricular model, class size, tuition, and a distributed model with possible campuses in Green Bay or Central Wisconsin. Also, we will evaluate the development of specialty tracks in Milwaukee in areas such as genomics and personalized pharmacy, oncology, mental health and research.

A proposal has been submitted to MCW's Advancing a Healthier Wisconsin endowment for development of the feasibility study.

The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy forecasts a shortage of 157,000 pharmacists nationwide by the year 2020. The need for pharmacists in the Midwest, particularly in Wisconsin, exceeds the national average. In Wisconsin, there is a continuing maldistribution of pharmacists in small communities and in medically-underserved urban areas. Since 2008, the national Pharmacy Workforce Center has consistently identified Wisconsin as one of the states with the highest demand for pharmacists.

"We believe MCW is well-positioned to develop innovative approaches to address Wisconsin's shortage of pharmacists," said John R. Raymond, Sr., MD, MCW's president and CEO. "MCW successfully responded to our state's projected shortage of physicians through the development of regional medical school campuses in Green Bay and central Wisconsin. MCW would bring that same commitment to innovation in pharmacy education."

MCW is opening a new medical school campus in Green Bay in 2015, and is projected to open a medical school campus in 2016 in central Wisconsin. The immersive medical educational model will allow students to complete their medical education in three years rather than a traditional four-year curriculum.