The truth-seeking nature of philosophy itself places the work of this discipline at the heart of our mission – Catholic, Norbertine and liberal arts. 

Philosophers’ Café

2012-13 Schedule
In the light of the upcoming election, the theme of our first four cafés will be broadly political. 

Note that the meeting time has changed from previous years. This year, cafes will be held the first Wednesday of every month. Our first café will be Wednesday Sept. 5, at A’s in De Pere from 7-8:30 p.m. 

Date/Location Topic and Description
Wednesday, Sept. 5
7-8:30 p.m.

A’s Restaurant and Music Café, 112 N. Broadway 
De Pere, WI 54115
Political Left and Right: Within Conversational – not Shouting Distance.
Moderator: 
Paul Johnson, Ph.D (St. Norbert)
 
In this café we will look at the political theories of both John Rawls and Robert Nozick and discuss how these theoretical foundations provide the basic insights of the political left and right. The challenge is to find a way to respect both, and incorporate them into workable policy solutions to the problems that confront us today. The danger is that each side will fail to appreciate the importance and value of the opposed viewpoint, engage in vociferous one-sided defense of its own vision and thereby undercut the middle ground between them where effective solutions are to be found.
Wednesday, Oct. 3
7-8:30 p.m.

Harmony Café
1660 W. Mason St.
Green Bay, WI

The Politics of Food
Moderator: 
Dallas Blaney, Ph.D (UW-Green Bay)

Following a disappointing growing season in the US and Russia, we are now facing a third major global food crisis in the last fifteen years.  Given widespread expectations of increased climate volatility it seems likely that we may experience additional crises in the near future.  We will discuss who suffers the most from such calamities and whether the United States, given its relative wealth and technology, ought to be doing more than other countries to stem this tide.  Should we initiate a global strategic food reserve?  We will discuss whether certain conceptions of justice make such a move a moral imperative. 

Wednesday, Nov. 7
7-8:30 p.m.

Harmony Café
1660 W. Mason St.
Green Bay, WI 
Citizen Activism in a Digital Age
Moderator: 
Eric Morgan, Ph.D (UW-Green Bay)

What role should citizen activism play in modern America?  In an increasingly interconnected electronic world of blogs, social networking media, and seemingly universal instant gratification -- coupled with the astronomical financial cost of political campaigns -- the grassroots movements of old now seem rather quaint.  But does it remain possible to develop prolonged and widespread movements like abolitionism or civil rights in our fragmented and hyperkinetic society?  How has technology helped to change and shape modern activism?  How should Americans become involved in the myriad issues of the day, particularly given the challenges of seemingly disinterested politicians and corporations?  We will discuss these questions and more as we explore the role of the citizen within a modern democratic society.