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Spring 2009 New & Special Topics Courses
CLAS 260-A Early Christian Monasticism
This course is an introduction to the subject of early Christian monasticism. Our focus will be on the time period often called Late Antiquity (ca.300-700). Students will learn about the rise of Christian monasticism in the deserts of Egypt and Syria, its eventual spread throughout the Greek and Latin parts of the Roman world, and eventually Ireland beyond the boundaries of the Empire. Monasticism will be examined in the context of both Christian and non-Christian concepts of asceticism and holiness prevalent in various cultures of antiquity, and its relationship to the wider church and society. The classical articulations of monastic spirituality and their subsequent influence will be an ongoing topic. Through a close reading of primary sources, as well as important secondary writers such as Peter Brown, students will develop a deeper understanding of this very important movement.

COME 389-A Special Topics: Health Communication
This course examines a variety of issues and theories related to health, including communication about health issues, communication in the health care industry, health campaigns and more. Health communication is unique in that it intersects different areas of the field including interpersonal communication, organizational communication, persuasion, media studies, family communication and more.

ECON 332-A Economics of Family and Gender
Application of economic models to issues associated with gender and family. Males and females as economic agents, the family as an economic unit, allocation of time between household and labor market, occupational choice, earnings differences, labor market discrimination, policies affecting the family, international comparisons. Prerequisite ECON 102

ECON 341-A Economics of Sports II
This course builds on the material covered in ECON 340. Explores the current state of sports economics; academic research of the economics of specific sports and leagues (NFL, NBA, MLB, European soccer, female intercollegiate sports, and a number of individual sports); demand theory; competitive balance; other topics. Prerequisite ECON 340

ENGL 289-A Special Topics: Creative Nonfiction Workshop
This course focuses on the writing of creative nonfiction. The approach is workshop-tutorial. Students will read works by currently publishing writers, and read and critique each others' works.

ENGL 489-A Special Topics: Hurston and Morrison
In this capstone seminar, we will examine the works of two major African American women writers of the twentieth century - Zora Neale Hurston and Toni Morrison. Together we will analyze their fiction and non fiction - novels, short stories, essays, and folklore - in light of the literary criticism, letters, biographies, and autobiographies that surround them. We will consider the importance of black feminism, racial identity, and canon formation along with African American identity, history, and culture as they inform the writings of Hurston and Morrison.

JAPN 389-A Special Topics: Intensive Intermediate Japanese
This course will focus on the Japanese language, focusing on the four language skills: reading writing, listening, and speaking.

PHIL 389-A Special Topics: Contemporary Continental Philosophy
A survey of the main developments and representative thinkers in the Contemporary Continental tradition. The primary focus of the course is on the development of post-modern methods of analysis of language, power, and metaphysics. Representative figures and developments studies include post-structuralism, deconstruction, Heidegger, Lyotard, Foucault, Derrida, and Zizek.

PHIL 389-B Special Topics: Happiness
An examination of classical and contemporary philosophical accounts of happiness. We will consider what happiness is, who is happy, how happiness can be attained, what relation there should be between happiness and politics, and whether happiness can be measured. We will also consider some applied issues, which may include whether measures of a country's well-being should include a happiness index; whether there is a relation between wealth and happiness; whether there is a relation between religious experience and happiness; and what, if anything, the extensive use of anti-depressants in our society means. Historical figures studied may include Epicurus, Seneca, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Mill, Sidgwick, and Nietzsche.

POLI 489-A Special Topics: The Political Economy of the Environment
Is it possible to have a thriving, globally competitive, green economy in the U.S.? Or would substantial environmental protection and use of alternative energies lead us to economic ruin? We will examine the growing field of environmental economics and apply its concepts to contemporary political issues and realities.

PSYC 489-A Special Topics: Development in Infancy and Toddlerhood
This advanced course in developmental psychology focuses on development from conception to the age of three and covers development at multiple levels including the physiological, behavioral, and psychological. It will also examine the infant in context; from their immediate family relationships to broader societal attitudes and policies towards infants. Prerequisites: PSYC 301 or instructor's permission.

RELS 260 A - Early Christian Monasticism
This course is an introduction to the subject of early Christian monasticism. Our focus will be on the time period often called Late Antiquity (ca.300-700). Students will learn about the rise of Christian monasticism in the deserts of Egypt and Syria, its eventual spread throughout the Greek and Latin parts of the Roman world, and eventually Ireland beyond the boundaries of the Empire. Monasticism will be examined in the context of both Christian and non-Christian concepts of asceticism and holiness prevalent in various cultures of antiquity, and its relationship to the wider church and society. The classical articulations of monastic spirituality and their subsequent influence will be an ongoing topic. Through a close reading of primary sources, as well as important secondary writers such as Peter Brown, students will develop a deeper understanding of this very important movement.

SOCI 289 A - Special Topics: Social Movements in the United States
This course identifies some of the main theoretical orientations within the sociological study of social movements. The key theories examined in this course will address the origins and emergence of collective behavior, the tactics and strategies used to attain certain goals or outcomes, and the external factors that influence movement success or failure. In addition to exploring theoretical knowledge, this class focuses heavily on contemporary American social movements such as the Civil Rights movement, the Women's Rights movements, environmental movements, labor movements, peace and anti-globalization movements, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) movements, ethnic and nationalist movements, religious movements, and counter-culture movements. By examining relevant theoretical orientations and applying them to contemporary social movements, this course helps uncover the ways in which social movements influence political, social, and cultural change.

SOCI 289 B - Special Topics: Globalization
This course provides an overview of major trends in globalization, exploring the impact of increased trade and communication on global society. We will place recent shifts in the global economy in historical perspective, examining the classic literature on colonialism and dependency, and then look at new understandings of global transformations. During the course of the semester we will discuss the measurement of globalization, the global division of labor, global commodity trade, and the creation of global culture. We will also examine the impact of globalization on women and ethnic minorities around the world.

SPAN 389 A - Special Topics: Gender, Sex, and Religion: Constructing Identity in the Spanish Golden Age
This course uses literary masterpieces from the Spanish Golden Age (sixteenth and seventeenth centuries) to examine the socio-historical, religious, and cultural tensions that permeated early modern Spain. Through the study of both canonical and less-known literary works, as well as critical and theoretical studies of the period, we will explore how authors represent the changing perceptions of gender, sex and religion in early modern Spanish society.

SPAN 389 B - Special Topics: Magical Realism in Latin American Fiction
This course explores the concept of magical realism in Latin American fiction through the reading and analysis of a selection of novels and short stories. Guiding the reading and discussions are essays on how different writers understand this idea. Prerequisite SPAN 302.



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