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Spring 2011 New & Special Topics Courses
AMER 489-A Special Topics: The Western: Fiction and Film
This course is an examination of the fictional and filmic portrayals of the American West between the 1870s and the 1890s within competing contexts of the historical and mythic depictions of an 'epic moment' in America's westward expansion. The course will cover historical and sociological texts, fiction texts, film texts and television texts, primarily American in origin with international examples included upon occasion and as appropriate.

BUAD 489-A Special Topics: Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining
In this course, we will examine the institution of labor relations in the United States. It will focus on why collective bargaining exists in some workplaces and not in others, the nature and complexity of bargaining processes and negotiation, what some of its impacts are and how it fits into the American economic, political, and social systems. International labor relations, diversity concerns and ethical issues will also be addressed.

COME 389-A Special Topics: Health Communications
This course is intended to provide students information regarding one of the fastest growing areas in the discipline of communication. It examines a variety of issues and theories related to health including communication about health issues, communication in the health care industry, health campaigns and more. Health communication is unique in that it intersects different areas of the field of communication, including interpersonal communication, organizational communication, persuasion, media studies, family communication and more.

ECON 489-A Special Topics: Imperfect Markets and Informal Institutions
This course covers topics of the area now broadly referred to as development microeconomics. The topics include the dual economy, and land, labor, credit, and insurance markets in developing countries. The focus will be on the emergence of informal institutions as a response to absent or incomplete markets in less developed economies.

ENGL 289-A Special Topics: Classic and Contemporary Fairy Tales
In the course we will examine the fairy tale as a historical and cultural force. We will begin the semester by reading the "classic" tales-those by the French Salon writers Charles Perrault (also known as Mother Goose), Madame d'Aulnoy, and Madam Leprince de Beaumont (teller of "Beauty and the Beast"); those adaptations by the Brothers Grimm; and selections from The Arabian Nights. Next, we will examine writers who wrote original fairy tales during the nineteenth-century, which include Hans Christian Andersen, Lewis Carroll, George MacDonald, Edith Nesbit, and Oscar Wilde. Finally, we will discuss twentieth-century fairy tale spinners-Kenneth Grahame, L. Frank Baum, C. S. Lewis, and more recent writers such as Angela Carter, Jane Yolen, Salman Rushdie, Emma Donoghue, and Francesca Lia Block. One class project will be devoted to creating an anthology of original fairy tales, so the class will certainly end happily ever after.

ENGL 489-A Advanced Seminar in English Literary Studies: Modern American Memoir
At the close of 2010, memoirs top the bestseller lists, reality TV rules the cable box, and documentaries vie with commercial shoot-em-ups at the box office. What's so compelling about these "true" stories? And what "truths" are they offering us? This semester, we will explore a range of contemporary American memoirs, paying attention to the construction of experience and self in each, and examining our relationships to autobiography as readers. In particular, we will note the ways in cultural markers such as gender, sexuality, "race," and class speak to (and are spoken by) these memoirs. Students will engage in a semester-long research project, culminating in a researched seminar paper, and will also write their own short memoir.

GENS 489-A Special Topics: The Western: Fiction and Film
This course is an examination of the fictional and filmic portrayals of the American West between the 1870s and the 1890s within competing contexts of the historical and mythic depictions of an 'epic moment' in America's westward expansion. The course will cover historical and sociological texts, fiction texts, film texts and television texts, primarily American in origin with international examples included upon occasion and as appropriate.

GENS 489-B Special Topics: Slavery from Ancient Greece to Antebellum America
This course begins with the institution of slavery as it existed in the ancient western world, then shifts to the legacy of slavery as it played out during the mid-nineteenth century, primarily in the United States. At this point in our nation's history, slavery had coexisted with Christianity and democracy for more than a thousand years, yet emancipated slaves and leaders of the abolition movement crafted non-fiction testimonials and novels designed to eradicate slavery. Emancipated slaves such as Frederick Douglass, Solomon Northrup, and Harriet Jacobs published slave narratives graphically depicting the gross injustices that slaves suffered. They argued that this suffering affected all Americans regardless of their residence in the free or slave states, and they invoked democratic ideals and Christian doctrines to win their readers to the abolitionist cause.

GEOG 489-A Special Topics: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems


MUSI 289-A Special Topics: Introduction to Music Composition
This course is intended to foster and develop the individual's unique musical vocabulary across a variety of genres while exposing students to fundamental techniques used in music creation including notation, engraving, instrumentation, arranging, improvisation and composition. Through practical guidance in the composition of original music and the exploration of a variety of compositional paradigms across multiple centuries, students will learn to arrange and create original musical works in a variety of styles for voice, solo instruments and small ensembles.

MUSI 389-A Special Topics: Introduction to Jazz Improvisation
Jazz Improvisation, or the spontaneous composition of music, is the most defining characteristic of the art of Jazz. Mastering this skill requires countless hours of practicing and a deep knowledge of style, form, and jazz harmony. This course will introduce students to these elements through the study of great soloists and their transcriptions. Emphasis will be placed on common scales, modes, and harmonic progressions. Students will be expected to perform in the classroom setting.

PHIL 389-A Special Topics: Philosophy of Law
The course involves a focused study of the philosophical foundations of law and legal theory. Topics include the nature of law, legal interpretation, legal epistemology, legal responsibility, and punishment.

PHIL 389-B Special Topics: Kant and German Idealism
The course begins with an in-depth study of Kant's critical philosophy and moves to consider its transformation into the Idealism of Hegel, Schopenhauer and other Continental philosophers of the 19th century. It will close with an examination of reactions to Idealism from figures such as Kierkegaard, Marx, and Nietzsche.

POLI 289-A Special Topics: Mock Trial
The Mock Trial course prepares students to compete in regional and national mock trail competitions. Students will use case materials to develop basic legal skills, as well as communication and argumentation skills.

POLI 389-A Special Topics: Philosophy of Law
The course involves a focused study of the philosophical foundations of law and legal theory. Topics include the nature of law, legal interpretation, legal epistemology, legal responsibility, and punishment.

POLI 489-A Special Topics: Community Building and Social Change
This course introduces students to the challenges and opportunities for building community in contemporary America. The service-learning component of this course benefits not only the students, but it also provides immediate action on significant community issues in the Green Bay area. Proposed and select by the community, the collaborative projects address issues related to affordable housing and community development, health, education, the environment, and social justice. Students have the opportunity to see first-hand the critical role that collaboration plays in the resolution of important social problems.

SOCI 289-A Special Topics: Shamanism
This course will explore indigenous ritual practices that fall under the broad term, shamanism. Topics will include anthropological, theological, folkloristic, and historic approaches to understanding this world wide phenomena. Prerequisite: SOCI 111.

SOCI 489-A Special Topics: Community Building and Social Change
This course introduces students to the challenges and opportunities for building community in contemporary America. The service-learning component of this course benefits not only the students, but it also provides immediate action on significant community issues in the Green Bay area. Proposed and select by the community, the collaborative projects address issues related to affordable housing and community development, health, education, the environment, and social justice. Students have the opportunity to see first-hand the critical role that collaboration plays in the resolution of important social problems.

SOCI 489-B Special Topics: Feminist Theory in Sociology
Feminist theory is a significant force in contemporary sociology and sociologists have made major contributions to feminist theory. Using primary source readings of theoretical and empirical works of feminist sociology, this course will address the emergence, development, and impact of feminist theory in sociology.

SOCI 489-C Special Topics: Native American Writing Systems
This course will analyze the diverse forms of writing sued by native peoples of the Americas, including, among others, the Nindoodem pictographs of the Anishinaabe, the glyphs of the Mayans, and the knotted cord records of the Andes.

SPAN 389-A Special Topics: Spanish Cinema: From la Movida to Now
When Franco died, the lid blew off Spanish society. From the early, heady years of the Destape to the latest Goya award winners, from hilarious comedy, to political critique, to the just plain disturbing - we'll see it all. Directors Almodóvar ( Mujeres al borde de un ataque de nervios, Volver), Amenábar (Tesis, Abre los ojos, Mar adentro), Icíar Bollaín (Te doy mis ojos), Emilio Martínez Lázaro (Las trece rosas), Julio Medem (Vacas, Los amantes del Círculo Polar), Gracia Querejeta (Cuando vuelves a mi lado), Guillermo del Toro (El espinazo del diablo, El laberinto del fauno, El orfanato), and more. Read film theory, review recent Spanish history, discuss cinematic techniques, debate the issues, and hone your language skills.

WMGS 489-A Special Topics: Feminist Theory in Sociology
Feminist theory is a significant force in contemporary sociology and sociologists have made major contributions to feminist theory. Using primary source readings of theoretical and empirical works of feminist sociology, this course will address the emergence, development, and impact of feminist theory in sociology.




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Phone: (920) 403-3216
Fax: (920) 403-4035
Email: registrar@snc.edu


St. Norbert College • 100 Grant Street • De Pere, WI 54115-2099