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2020-21 Programs

ANTHEM! - Sound Resilience During Hard Times

We find ourselves in a historical moment marked by a long overdue reckoning with structural racism, contentious political divide, and a global pandemic that has radically shifted our everyday lives. This year has been incredibly difficult and painful, and it has provided a profound reminder of how important resilience is for all of us. But most importantly, this year has illuminated how the pursuit of resilience must be collective.

Given this, we are excited to be organizing a series of events and programs focused on music (as well as other aspects of sound such as spoken word, poetry, podcasts, etc.) and the ways in which sound can be a sustaining force in our lives during hard times. Year Anthem! will bring powerful and engaging scholars, artists, & change-agents whose work illustrates how music has proven to be a driving force in movements for social change. These events will also explore how music can function as an important site to examine identities, power, and imagining a more just future.

Anthems articulate a shared group identity, a cause, and a purpose. Together, let’s explore the music and the sounds that can help us engage in “transformative thinking for a just world.”


2021 Programs

January 11, 2021

4-5:00pm

Coffee, Crafts, and Conversation with Carol and the Cassandra Voss Center

Join the Cassandra Voss Center’s resident scholar Dr. Carol Bruess for one of the most chill, hands-on, and joyful zoom events to kick off the new year: an hour of tutoring you on how to make crafty bookmarks out of washi tape! We’re limiting participation to 30 students per event, so don’t miss your chance to grab a spot at the crafty-Carol-table (zoom) as she reveals her favorite creative activity in January. All materials will be supplied for you!

Register here!

March 4, 2021

2-3:30pm 

Urgent Archives: Activating the Past for Liberation Now

Far from housing neutral or objective documentation of the past, archives are intensely contentious sites of political struggle in the current moment. Power is implicated in every archival intervention, from decisions about what to keep, to how to describe records, whether or not to digitize them, and who, if anyone should access them. This talk will address the ways that archival theories and practices have actively contributed to systems of oppression and will help us imagine and enact reconfigurations of archives that encourage mutual co-liberation. Such liberatory memory work needs to address the temporal, representational, and material politics of activating the past in the present. Thetalk will end with a proposition for all of us to “imagine otherwise,” that is, to conceive of and build a world in which communities that have historically been and are currently being oppressed are fully empowered to represent their past, construct their present, and envision their futures as forms of liberation.

michellecaswell.jpg

2021 Programs

January 11, 2021

4-5:00pm

Coffee, Crafts, and Conversation with Carol and the Cassandra Voss Center

Join the Cassandra Voss Center’s resident scholar Dr. Carol Bruess for one of the most chill, hands-on, and joyful zoom events to kick off the new year: an hour of tutoring you on how to make crafty bookmarks out of washi tape! We’re limiting participation to 30 students per event, so don’t miss your chance to grab a spot at the crafty-Carol-table (zoom) as she reveals her favorite creative activity in January. All materials will be supplied for you!

Register here!

March 4, 2021

2-3:30pm 

Urgent Archives: Activating the Past for Liberation Now

Far from housing neutral or objective documentation of the past, archives are intensely contentious sites of political struggle in the current moment. Power is implicated in every archival intervention, from decisions about what to keep, to how to describe records, whether or not to digitize them, and who, if anyone should access them. This talk will address the ways that archival theories and practices have actively contributed to systems of oppression and will help us imagine and enact reconfigurations of archives that encourage mutual co-liberation. Such liberatory memory work needs to address the temporal, representational, and material politics of activating the past in the present. Thetalk will end with a proposition for all of us to “imagine otherwise,” that is, to conceive of and build a world in which communities that have historically been and are currently being oppressed are fully empowered to represent their past, construct their present, and envision their futures as forms of liberation.

michellecaswell.jpg
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