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Black History Month

Black History Month is a month long celebration full of events that raise awareness of the African American culture. The month is often celebrated with the annual common prayer with a gospel choir, Soul Food Dinner and many other events. Students, faculty and staff from the campus community, friends and community members are invited to celebrate the gifts of African Americans in scholarship, music and food. 

If you would like more information about the Black History Month Celebration please contact Bridgit Martin, Director of Multicultural Student Services. 

Unless noted, the events below are closed to the public due to the covid-19 pandemic. Events with asterisk are open to the public. Thank you for your understanding. We look forward to welcoming the public back to campus as soon as it is safe to do so!

Throughout the month of February

 * denotes events that are open to the public

Week 2

Monday, Feb. 8

Encountering a Multiracial Democracy: Some Notes for Catholics with Dr. Craig Ford*
7 p.m. - Virtual

Dr. Craig Ford is Assistant Professor of Theology and Religious Studies at St. Norbert College. He is a scholar-activist and, in his teaching, addresses questions of gender, race, sexuality and social justice. His current book project seeks to articulate a new theology of sex and gender for the Roman Catholic tradition. Dr. Ford's lecture is a part of the virtual series entitled The Demands of Encounter Today, hosted by the Loyola Institute of Ministry. The three lectures explore the demands on us of Pope Francis's call to create a culture of encounter. All lectures are free and open to the public. Register

 

Wednesday, Feb. 10

Bay Area Burger Co. Food Truck*
11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Bay Area Burger Co food truck will be parked in the College Ave culdesac between the welcome center and the library. In addition to some great food, 15% of sales will benefit Black Student Union. Come out and support a black-owned business and BSU!

“Homegrown Hate & Domestic Terrorism” with Daryl Johnson
*
6:30 p.m. - Virtual

Hosted by the Norman Miller Center, Daryl Johnson is one of the foremost experts on domestic extremist groups in the US. He is currently the founder of DT Analytics, a private consulting firm for law enforcement. he is regularly cited, featured, or quoted in media covering domestic extremist groups in the US, including the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, to name a few. Johnson is also a freelance write for various media and civil rights organizations. In 2012, he testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on hate crimes and the threat of domestic extremism. Also joining the discussion will be Dr. Robert Pyne, Director of the Norman Miller Center, and political science professors Dr. Wendy Scattergood and Dr. Angel Saavedra Cisneros.  This program is co- hosted by The Wisconsin Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies and We Are Many, United Against Hate.
Register

Thursday, Feb. 11

BSU Bingo Night
6:30 p.m. - Cofrin 11

Prizes included! Students only. Space is limited, please register in advance. 

BSU Bingo

Week 3

Wednesday, Feb. 17

BSU and BurgersBay Area Burger Co. Food Truck*
11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Bay Area Burger Co food truck will be parked in the College Ave culdesac between the welcome center and the library. In addition to some great food, 15% of sales will benefit Black Student Union. Come out and support a black-owned business and BSU!

Week 4

Thursday, Feb. 25

Sounding Freedom's (Im)Possibilities: Janell Monae's Sonic Cyberfeminism with Meina Yates-Richard
2:30 - 3:30 pm 

Meina Yates-Richard is an Assistant Professor of African American Studies and English at Emory University. She earned her PhD in English and Certificate in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies from Rice University in 2016 and was awarded a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship in 2018-2019. Professor Yates-Richard specializes in African American, African diasporic and American literature and culture. Her monograph project in progress examines the relationship between transatlantic slavery, Black maternal sonority and liberation imaginings in African American and African diasporic literatures and sonic cultures. She was awarded the 2016 Norman Foerster Prize for Best Essay published in American Literature in 2016 for her essay, “‘WHAT IS YOUR MOTHER’S NAME?’: Maternal Disavowal and the Reverberating Aesthetic of Black Women’s Pain in Black Nationalist Literature.” Her work appears in amsj: American Studies, the Journal of West Indian Literature, and post45. Her forthcoming work includes an article in Feminist Review entitled "Hell You Talmbout?: Janelle Monae's Black Cyberfeminist Sonic Aesthetics" and an essay in the Cambridge UP volume Ralph Ellison in Context entitled "Sounds and Signs of Black Womanhood."

REGISTER HERE

Mr. SNC 
6:30 p.m. - Walter Theater

Please join us for SNC's only male pageant hosted by the Black Student Union! Prizes available for participants. Space is limited, please register in advance.


Committing to Anti-Racism in Green Bay: A Conversation with an Interracial Couple*
7 p.m. - Virtual

Presented by OUT|LOUD as part of their Lenten series During the Second Week of Lent, everyone is invited to an evening conversation with Barbara and Gerald Henley titled “Committing to Anti-Racism in Green Bay: A Conversation with an Interracial Couple.” Barb and Gerald are residents of Sobieski, Wisconsin, who initially met each other at University of Wisconsin--Stevens Point. In conversation with Kerry Guyette, an OUT|LOUD member, they will talk about their experiences as an interracial couple, offering us their insights into doing racial justice work in the Green Bay area.

Friday, Feb. 26

Soul Food in the Caf
4:30- 7 p.m.- Ruth’s Marketplace

The term “Soul Food” originated from the cuisine developed by African slaves mainly from the American South. A dark and despicable period in the history of the United States resulted in a cuisine fashioned from the meager ingredients available to the slave and sharecropper black families. The ingredients used were the least desirable cuts of meats and vegetables, and were all that was available for the slaves to prepare nutritious meals for their families. From these meager ingredients evolved a cuisine that is simple yet hearty and delicious. Come join us for foods inspired by traditional soul foods!

Week 1

Wednesday, Feb. 3

Bay Area Burger Co. Food Truck*
11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Bay Area Burger Co food truck will be parked in the College Ave culdesac between the welcome center and the library. In addition to some great food, 15% of sales will benefit Black Student Union. Come out and support a black-owned business and BSU!

Thursday, Feb. 4

Wounded Healers posterOvercoming by Word of Our Testimonies: Black – Male - Wounded Healers with Dr. Timothy Berry
6-8 p.m. - Virtual

Due to systematic racism, Black males have been excluded from upward mobility, victimized by dehumanization, fallen prey to biased policing practices, and plagued by disparities in health and education. Such conditions have led to internalizing toxic race-based stress causing damage to the central nervous system in Black bodies. Using foundations of Critical Race Theory (CRT), combined with music and text, this work expresses the ways in which Black males have suffered, transcended their own pain, and fostered healing through creativity. A post-performance discussion is offered for audience members to engage in reflection and critical discourse with the writer and performers. Access the event

Week 2

Monday, Feb. 8

Encountering a Multiracial Democracy: Some Notes for Catholics with Dr. Craig Ford*
7 p.m. - Virtual

Dr. Craig Ford is Assistant Professor of Theology and Religious Studies at St. Norbert College. He is a scholar-activist and, in his teaching, addresses questions of gender, race, sexuality and social justice. His current book project seeks to articulate a new theology of sex and gender for the Roman Catholic tradition. Dr. Ford's lecture is a part of the virtual series entitled The Demands of Encounter Today, hosted by the Loyola Institute of Ministry. The three lectures explore the demands on us of Pope Francis's call to create a culture of encounter. All lectures are free and open to the public. Register

 

Wednesday, Feb. 10

Bay Area Burger Co. Food Truck*
11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Bay Area Burger Co food truck will be parked in the College Ave culdesac between the welcome center and the library. In addition to some great food, 15% of sales will benefit Black Student Union. Come out and support a black-owned business and BSU!

“Homegrown Hate & Domestic Terrorism” with Daryl Johnson
*
6:30 p.m. - Virtual

Hosted by the Norman Miller Center, Daryl Johnson is one of the foremost experts on domestic extremist groups in the US. He is currently the founder of DT Analytics, a private consulting firm for law enforcement. he is regularly cited, featured, or quoted in media covering domestic extremist groups in the US, including the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, to name a few. Johnson is also a freelance write for various media and civil rights organizations. In 2012, he testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on hate crimes and the threat of domestic extremism. Also joining the discussion will be Dr. Robert Pyne, Director of the Norman Miller Center, and political science professors Dr. Wendy Scattergood and Dr. Angel Saavedra Cisneros.  This program is co- hosted by The Wisconsin Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies and We Are Many, United Against Hate.
Register

Thursday, Feb. 11

BSU Bingo Night
6:30 p.m. - Cofrin 11

Prizes included! Students only. Space is limited, please register in advance. 

BSU Bingo

Week 3

Wednesday, Feb. 17

BSU and BurgersBay Area Burger Co. Food Truck*
11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Bay Area Burger Co food truck will be parked in the College Ave culdesac between the welcome center and the library. In addition to some great food, 15% of sales will benefit Black Student Union. Come out and support a black-owned business and BSU!

Week 4

Thursday, Feb. 25

Sounding Freedom's (Im)Possibilities: Janell Monae's Sonic Cyberfeminism with Meina Yates-Richard
2:30 - 3:30 pm 

Meina Yates-Richard is an Assistant Professor of African American Studies and English at Emory University. She earned her PhD in English and Certificate in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies from Rice University in 2016 and was awarded a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship in 2018-2019. Professor Yates-Richard specializes in African American, African diasporic and American literature and culture. Her monograph project in progress examines the relationship between transatlantic slavery, Black maternal sonority and liberation imaginings in African American and African diasporic literatures and sonic cultures. She was awarded the 2016 Norman Foerster Prize for Best Essay published in American Literature in 2016 for her essay, “‘WHAT IS YOUR MOTHER’S NAME?’: Maternal Disavowal and the Reverberating Aesthetic of Black Women’s Pain in Black Nationalist Literature.” Her work appears in amsj: American Studies, the Journal of West Indian Literature, and post45. Her forthcoming work includes an article in Feminist Review entitled "Hell You Talmbout?: Janelle Monae's Black Cyberfeminist Sonic Aesthetics" and an essay in the Cambridge UP volume Ralph Ellison in Context entitled "Sounds and Signs of Black Womanhood."

REGISTER HERE

Mr. SNC 
6:30 p.m. - Walter Theater

Please join us for SNC's only male pageant hosted by the Black Student Union! Prizes available for participants. Space is limited, please register in advance.


Committing to Anti-Racism in Green Bay: A Conversation with an Interracial Couple*
7 p.m. - Virtual

Presented by OUT|LOUD as part of their Lenten series During the Second Week of Lent, everyone is invited to an evening conversation with Barbara and Gerald Henley titled “Committing to Anti-Racism in Green Bay: A Conversation with an Interracial Couple.” Barb and Gerald are residents of Sobieski, Wisconsin, who initially met each other at University of Wisconsin--Stevens Point. In conversation with Kerry Guyette, an OUT|LOUD member, they will talk about their experiences as an interracial couple, offering us their insights into doing racial justice work in the Green Bay area.

Friday, Feb. 26

Soul Food in the Caf
4:30- 7 p.m.- Ruth’s Marketplace

The term “Soul Food” originated from the cuisine developed by African slaves mainly from the American South. A dark and despicable period in the history of the United States resulted in a cuisine fashioned from the meager ingredients available to the slave and sharecropper black families. The ingredients used were the least desirable cuts of meats and vegetables, and were all that was available for the slaves to prepare nutritious meals for their families. From these meager ingredients evolved a cuisine that is simple yet hearty and delicious. Come join us for foods inspired by traditional soul foods!

Week 1

Wednesday, Feb. 3

Bay Area Burger Co. Food Truck*
11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Bay Area Burger Co food truck will be parked in the College Ave culdesac between the welcome center and the library. In addition to some great food, 15% of sales will benefit Black Student Union. Come out and support a black-owned business and BSU!

Thursday, Feb. 4

Wounded Healers posterOvercoming by Word of Our Testimonies: Black – Male - Wounded Healers with Dr. Timothy Berry
6-8 p.m. - Virtual

Due to systematic racism, Black males have been excluded from upward mobility, victimized by dehumanization, fallen prey to biased policing practices, and plagued by disparities in health and education. Such conditions have led to internalizing toxic race-based stress causing damage to the central nervous system in Black bodies. Using foundations of Critical Race Theory (CRT), combined with music and text, this work expresses the ways in which Black males have suffered, transcended their own pain, and fostered healing through creativity. A post-performance discussion is offered for audience members to engage in reflection and critical discourse with the writer and performers. Access the event

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