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Winter 2011 New & Special Topics Courses
BIOL 489-A Special Topics: Neuroscience
A comprehensive lecture, laboratory, and discussion course of the scientific study of the nervous system. Topics covered include the origins of neuroscience, methods of study, neural development, neurophysiology, motor systems, brain sexual differentiation, circadian rhythms, stress, learning and memory, consciousness, and nervous system disorders. Laboratory exercises will focus on histological techniques, neuroanatomy, tract tracing, invertebrate neurophysiology, human electroencephalography, learned sensory responses, and neuroethology. Research articles seminal to the field of neuroscience will also be discussed.

BUAD 289-A Special Topics: Social Media Marketing and Thought Leadership


BUAD 289-B Special Topics: Entrepreneurship: New Venture Creation
This course focuses on one primary aspect of entrepreneurship: taking a new business from its initial concept to crafting a master plan for implementing the steps to launch the enterprise. Students will evaluate their own potential as entrepreneurs and develop a comprehensive planning document that could serve as the platform for creating a new business venture. Course fulfills BUAD Marketing or Management Concentration Elective.

CLAS 209-A Hellenistic Philosophy
The course will introduce students to the three major schools of Hellenistic philosophy that dominated Greek thought after Aristotle: Pyrrhonian Scepticism, Stoicism, and Epicureanism. Using Martha Nussbaum's influential study, The Therapy of Desire, as the core text, students will investigate the Hellenistic philosophers' departure from the Classical conception of the good life and the implications of this departure not only for ethics but for metaphysics and epistemology as well. Prerequisite: PHIL 120. Cross-listed with PHIL 209.

ENGL 304-A Creative Non-Fiction Workshop
This course focuses on the writing of creative nonfiction, or nonfiction of a literary bent. This may include the memoir, the personal essay, creative journalism, travel or nature writing or expressive cultural criticism. The approach is workshop-tutorial. Students will read and critique each other's works; they will also read a range of published works in the genre.

GENS 489-A Special Topics: Slavery from Ancient Greece to Antebellum America
This course begins with the institution of slavery as it existed in the ancient western world, then shifts to the legacy of slavery as it played out during the mid-nineteenth century, primarily in the United States. At this point in our nation's history, slavery had coexisted with Christianity and democracy for more than a thousand years, yet emancipated slaves and leaders of the abolition movement crafted non-fiction testimonials and novels designed to eradicate slavery. Emancipated slaves such as Frederick Douglass, Solomon Northrup, and Harriet Jacobs published slave narratives graphically depicting the gross injustices that slaves suffered. They argued that this suffering affected all Americans regardless of their residence in the free or slave states, and they invoked democratic ideals and Christian doctrines to win their readers to the abolitionist cause.

LEAD 361-A Peer Leadership in Student Affairs
This course aims to provide students with an opportunity to explore contemporary student development theory, to understand the needs and leadership gifts of a variety of special populations, to learn about and practice a variety of helping skills in order to create change, and to apply this knowledge on our residential campus in a way that leads to a changed campus culture and improved student life. Fulfills Leadership Studies Leadership in Context requirement.

PHIL 209-A Hellenistic Philosophy
The course will introduce students to the three major schools of Hellenistic philosophy that dominated Greek thought after Aristotle: Pyrrhonian Scepticism, Stoicism, and Epicureanism. Using Martha Nussbaum's influential study, The Therapy of Desire, as the core text, students will investigate the Hellenistic philosophers' departure from the Classical conception of the good life and the implications of this departure not only for ethics but for metaphysics and epistemology as well. Prerequisite: PHIL 120. Cross-listed with CLAS 209.

RELS 359-A Women and Islam
Since medieval times, nothing about Islam has perplexed the West more than the role of women. We consider the current Western view of Muslim women as victims before reading translated Islamic texts on gender and historical evidence of Muslim women's religious and social activities since the sixth century. We will look at these texts from various points of view, including the feminist. Attitudes toward the body - involving sexuality, purity, fertility, and seclusion - will be examined in a comparative context. Finally, we will study how are current Muslim women scholars and activists bringing about new identities for Muslim women worldwide. Cross-listed with WMGS 359. Fulfills GS11 - Global Society requirement.

WMGS 359-A Women and Islam
Since medieval times, nothing about Islam has perplexed the West more than the role of women. We consider the current Western view of Muslim women as victims before reading translated Islamic texts on gender and historical evidence of Muslim women's religious and social activities since the sixth century. We will look at these texts from various points of view, including the feminist. Attitudes toward the body - involving sexuality, purity, fertility, and seclusion - will be examined in a comparative context. Finally, we will study how are current Muslim women scholars and activists bringing about new identities for Muslim women worldwide. Cross-listed with RELS 359. Fulfills GS11 - Global Society requirement.




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Phone: (920) 403-3216
Fax: (920) 403-4035
Email: registrar@snc.edu


St. Norbert College • 100 Grant Street • De Pere, WI 54115-2099