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Calendar of Events


Sept. 17

11 a.m.-
1 p.m..

Baer Mall

 

U.S. Constitution Day

Stop by and pick up a pocket version of the U.S. Constitution

 

Sept. 17

7-9 p.m.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Documentary Series: "Pray the Devil Back to Hell"

The film documents a peace movement called Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace. Organized by social worker Leymah Gbowee, the movement started with praying and singing in a fish market. Leymah Gbowee organized the Christian and Muslim women of Monrovia, Liberia to pray for peace and to organize nonviolent protests. Dressed in white to symbolize peace, and numbering in the thousands, the women became a political force against violence and against their government. Their movement led to the election of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf in Liberia, the first African nation with a female president. 

There is limited in-person seating available for this event, please arrive early to assure a seat. Doors will be closed once occupancy is met. Social distance and masking must be observed throughout the duration of the event.

Sept. 21

7 p.m.

Virtual Event

"Resilience as a Community" a Miller Lecture event with Leymah Gbowee

Consistent with the purposes of the Norman and Louis Miller Lecture Series, Ms. Gbowee wrote, "In the middle of this heartbreaking pandemic, notice that it is alerting global citizens--regardless of race, status, and accomplishments--to rethink life, our interactions, and attitudes toward "the other" and many more. This moment in our global history has forcibly reminded us of the inevitable truth--we are more connected than we are divided and our humanity is tied in ways that we have sadly allowed ourselves to forget. As we navigate this moment, let us all use our moments of social distancing to think about acts that bring our societies closer when the dust settles."

Ms. Gbowee won the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize and is a Liberian peace activist, social worker and women's rights advocate. She is the founder and President of the Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa. Ms. Gbowee is best known for leading a nonviolent movement of Christian and Muslim women which played a pivotal role in ending the fourteen-year Liberian civil war. 

Q&A with audience to follow.

Follow this link to register for the event.

Sept. 22

2-4 p.m.

Baer Mall

Voting Information/Education Table

Stop by the voter information/education tables in Baer Mall to connect with Rachel Benck, our CEEP fellow, and COVO about voting questions.  

Sept. 24

7 p.m.

Virtual Event

"From Civility to Justice-Conversations Across the Aisle for Human Dignity and the Common Good" with MT Dàvila

Join MT Davila, Associate Professor of Practice at Merrimack College in North Andover, Massachusetts and president of the Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States (ACHTUS) for this virtual conversation across the aisle.

Dr. Dávila will present a lecture entitled From Civility to Justice: Conversations Across the Aisle for Human Dignity and the Common Good. In this talk she will explore the ways in which an emphasis on civility in the midst of our present political polarization can do great harm to many of the most vulnerable, minoritized, and marginalized populations among us, by allowing continued injustices to be perpetrated against migrant families, trans men and women, religious minorities, and others.  By contrast, in order to restore justice as a core principle of our public discourse, Dr. Dávila argues we must redirect our attention away from civility alone and reevaluate our conceptions of such basic principles of justice as human dignity and the common good.   

Follow this link for more information.

This event is co-sponsored by the Killeen Chair of Theology and Philosophy

Sept. 29

12-1:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art in a Democratic Society Lecture Series: Amanda Lovelee

Amanda Lovelee is a visual artist based in Minnesota. Lovelee had focused on civic engagement through a variety of projects. She worked as a "City Artist" through The Public Art St. Paul Program developing projects that made city planning more accessible to city residents.

Follow this link for more information.

Sept. 29

7:30-9:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Presidential Debate Viewing Party

Join other SNC campus members to watch the 2020 Presidential debate. Co-Sponsored by Pi Sigma Alpha, the political science honor society. 

Oct. 1

7:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Documentary Discussion: "White Right: Meeting the Enemy"

Join us for a discussion of the documentary "White Right: Meeting the Enemy" ahead of Arno Michaelis' event on Oct. 13. Watch the film on your own schedule and join us virtual to discuss it. The documentary is streaming for free on SNC Kanopy

Registration coming soon.

 Oct. 7

7:30-9:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Vice Presidential Debate Viewing Party

Join other SNC campus members to watch the 2020 Vice-Presidential debate. Co-Sponsored by Pi Sigma Alpha, the political science honor society. 

Oct. 13

7 p.m.

Cofrin 11 and Virtual Event

 

"The Gift of our Wounds" a conversation with Arno Michaelis

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Arno Michaelis was a founding member of a notorious worldwide racist skinhead organization, a reverend of a self-declared holy war and frontman of the hate-medal band, Centurion, which sold 20,000 CDs by the mid-nineties and is still popular with racists today. Single parenthood, love for his daughter and the forgiveness shown by people he once hated all helped turn Arno's life around, bringing him to embrace diversity  and practice gratitude for all life. After spending over a decade as a successful information technology consultant and entrepreneur, Arno is now a speaker, author of My Life After Hate and very fortunate to be able to share his ongoing process of character development with the world in an effort to counter the cycle of violence he once fueled.

Arno is featured in the Deeyah Kahn documentary "White Right Meeting the Enemy" . This film is available on SNC Kanopy or through this youtube link. We recommend viewing the film at your convenience prior to the program.

There is limited in-person seating available for this event, please arrive early to assure a seat. Doors will be closed once occupancy is met. Social distance and masking must be observed throughout the duration of the event.

Follow this link to register for the zoom portion of this event.

 Oct. 15

7:30-9:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Presidential Debate Viewing Party

Join other SNC campus members to watch the 2020 presidential debate. Co-Sponsored by Pi Sigma Alpha, the political science honor society. 

Oct. 21

3:30-4:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Fr. Gregory Boyle Book Discussion with Bridget Burke Ravizza, Cabrini Jablon, and Becky Lahti 
In anticipation of Fr. Gregory Boyle's virtual visit to SNC as the 2020 St. Norbert Ambassador of Peace (award presentation and lecture on October 27), the Norman Miller Center for Peace, Justice & Public Understanding is hosting a faculty/staff discussion of his book, Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion. Leading this Zoom discussion will be Becky Lahti, Interim Co-Director of the Emmaus Center, Cabrini Jablon, Associate Director of Admission, and Bridget Burke Ravizza, Professor of Theology and Religious Studies. The book discussion will take place on October 21, from 3:30 to 4:30pm. Please follow the link below to register.
The Norman Miller Center will provide free copies of the book for the first 25 SNC faculty or staff members who register and request a copy. If you already have a copy of the book, you will be able to note that on the registration form as well.   
Follow this link to register.

 Oct. 22

7:30-9:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Presidential Debate Viewing Party

Join other SNC campus members to watch the 2020 presidential debate. Co-Sponsored by Pi Sigma Alpha, the political science honor society. 

Oct. 27

 

7 p.m.

Virtual Event

"The Whole Language: The Power of Extravagant Tenderness" Ambassador of Peace Award with Fr. Gregory Boyle

Fr. Boyle will share what he has learned in three decades working with marginalized populations at Homeboy Industries in Los Angeles, CA--that love is the answer, community is the context and tenderness is the connective tissue. Tenderness reflects the foundational notion that there are no is and them, only us. homeboy seeks to be what the world is invited to become. Kinship cannot happen without tenderness.

A native Angeleno and Jesuit priest, from 1986 to 1992 Father Boyle served as pastor of Dolores Mission Church in Boyle Heights, then the poorest Catholic parish in Los Angeles that also had the highest concentration of gang activity in the city. Father Boyle witnessed the devastating impact of gang violence on his community during the so-called "decade of death" that began in the late 1980s and peaked at 1,000 gang-related killings in 1992. In the face of law enforcement tactics and criminal justice policies of suppression and mass incarceration as the means to end gang violence, he and parish and community members adopted what was a radical approach at the time: treat gang members as human beings

In 1988 they started what would eventually become Homeboy Industries, which employs and trains former gang members in a range of social enterprises, as well as provides critical services to thousands of men and women who walk through its door every year seeking a better life.

Follow this link to register for the event.

Nov. 3

Election Day 

Nov. 10

12-1:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art in a Democratic Society Lecture: Girl Child Art Foundation

The Girl Child Art Foundation is an organization based in Lagos Nigeria that focuses on advocacy, empowerment, and civic engagement of girls through the arts.

Follow this link for more information.

Nov. 17

12-1:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art in a Democratic Society Lecture Series: Laurie Jo Reynolds

Laurie Jo Reynolds is an artist, policy advocate, and researcher who developed the concept of “Legislative Art”, an art practice that seeks to intervene in government systems with the goal of concrete political change.

Follow this link for more information.

March 23

7:00 p.m.

Birder Hall

"Etty"

Etty is a one-woman play based on the diaries and letters of Etty Hillesum, adapted and performed by Susan Stein. Directed by Austin Pendleton.

Using only Etty Hillesum's words, Susan Stein's adaptation brings us to 1941 when Esther "Etty" Hillesum, a young Dutch Jewish woman, is living in Amsterdam. Upon the recommendation of her therapist, Julius Spier, she began a diary on 8 March 1941 to help her with her depression. Hoping to become a writer, the diaries take on their own literary life, presenting both Etty's growth as a writer and spiritual transformation. As deportations begin, she prepares for the three day journey eastward, she digs deeper into her soul to understand this piece of history and root out any hatred or bitterness, believing that humanity is the best and only solution for survival. Etty's words, insights and beliefs reach out from the Holocaust and allow us to see the power of hope and individual thought in the most extreme circumstances. In her gentle yet forthright way, Etty asks us not to leave her at Auschwitz but to let her have a bit of a say in what she hopes will be a new world.

April 8

5:15 p.m.
Reception

7:00 p.m..
Lecture

Walter Theatre

Spring Miller Lecture with Tom Kunkel

Invite Only Reception
Michels Commons Ballroom

Lecture
Walter Theatre

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