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Past Events

2021-2022

Sept. 14

12 p.m.

Virtual Program

Art in a Democratic Society Lecture Series with Aram Han Sifuentes

Aram Han Sifuentes is a fiber and social practice artist who works to claim spaces for immigrant and disenfranchised communities. Her work often revolves around skill sharing, specifically sewing techniques, to create multiethnic and intergenerational sewing circles, which become a place for empowerment, subversion, and protest. Exhibitions of her work have been exhibited at Jane Addams Hull-House Museum (Chicago), Hyde Park Art Center (Chicago), Chicago Cultural Center (Chicago), Pulitzer Arts Foundation (St. Louis), MCA Denver (Denver), and Moody Center for the Arts (Houston). Her multi-stage solo exhibition, Talking Back to Power: Projects by Aram Han Sifuentes, is currently on view at the Skirball Cultural Center (Los Angeles) through 2023.

 

Sept. 14

2-4 p.m.

Campus Center Lawn

SNC Involvement Fair

Stop by the NMC table at the Involvement fair to learn more about our programming, write a postcard to refugee children through the JRS Any Refugee program or register to vote with the help of COVO.

 

Sept. 17

11:30 a.m. -1:00 p.m.

Michels Commons Lobby

Constitution Day

The NMC staff will be distributing pocket copies of the US Constitution outside of Ruth's Marketplace over the lunch hours. Stop by to pick up you own copy. 

 

Oct. 5

12 p.m.

Virtual Program

 Art in a Democratic Society Lecture Series with U.S. Department of Arts and Culture

Founded in 2013 The U.S. Department of Arts and Culture (USDAC) is a “people-powered department” (not a federal agency) committed to supporting individuals and organizations in mobilizing creativity in the service of justice. While social issues may be grounded in politics and economics, the USDAC believes that to change the world we need to change the story. Images, language, and attitudes affect our ability to understand and act on the challenges we face as a society. The USDAC offers pathways of engagement for individuals and organizations eager to deepen a commitment to creativity and social change through the promotion of caring, reciprocity, and open communication.

 

Oct. 5

7 p.m. Lecture

Virtual Program

Norman and Louis Miller Lecture Series with Nadine Strossen

“How Should We Resist Hate? Free Speech vs. Censorship”

Professor Strossen's presentation will explain why the grand goals of the Miller Lecture – “celebrating human dignity and encouraging better understanding between people” – are best promoted by freedom of speech, even for hateful, extremist, and false speech.  Although calls to censor such speech are well-intentioned, experience demonstrates that censorship inevitably is at best ineffective, and at worst counterproductive, in advancing these important goals.  She will dispel several common  misunderstandings about free speech law that undermine support for it.  She will also discuss the many non-censorial measures that are more constructive in promoting individual dignity and intergroup understanding. She is especially looking forward to the audience Q&A session, because she is eager to answer as many questions and comments as possible that audience members may have about any free speech issues.

Follow this link to view the lecture

 

Oct. 6

1:00 p.m.

Virtual Program

Book discussion with Nadine Strossen: "HATE: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech, Not Censorship" 
On October 5, the Norman Miller Center will welcome virtually Nadine Strossen, immediate past President of the American Civil Liberties Union (1991-2008) and the John Marshall Harlan II Professor of Law at New York Law School,  for the Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding. Strossen is a leading expert in constitutional law and civil liberties. In anticipation of her visit, we are offering an opportunity for St. Norbert College faculty and staff to read and discuss her recent book, which is the topic of her presentation. In HATE: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech, Not Censorship, Strossen makes the argument that the best approach to combat hateful, extremist, and false speech is through counter speech. She maintains that although calls to censor hateful speech may be well-intentioned, such efforts are ineffective and counterproductive. The NMC will provide free copies of the book for up to 20 participants, who will join Strossen for a private discussion of the book and her lecture on October 6.

 

Oct. 11

5:30 p.m.
Reception

7 p.m.
Lecture

Bemis International Center/Virtual program via Zoom

Ambassador of Peace Award honoring Bishop Mark Seitz

Reception
Hendrickson Dining Room-Bemis International Center, St. Norbert College

Award Presentation and Lecture
Fort Howard Theater-Bemis International Center, St. Norbert College

Eucharist: The Body of Christ in History

At the core of Christianity stands the conviction that the death and Resurrection of Jesus Christ inaugurated a new moment in human history, with the birth of a community called to be witnesses to the end of victimization, the refusal to return violence for violence, and boundless hospitality and mercy given to us in the Eucharist. As a people nourished by the Eucharist, the church is called to risk entering into the world of the Crucified ones of today, to unlearn a sinful and dehumanizing logic that continues to weigh heavily on the poor, and to enact in history the way of agape and Communion. In this talk, Bishop Mark J. Seitz of the Diocese of El Paso speaks to his experience of a Eucharistic church that does justice on the US-Mexico border.

Both the reception and lecture are free and open to the public

The award presentation and lecture will be presented in a hybrid format both in-person at the Fort Howard Theater and virtually via Zoom. There is no registration for the in-person side of the program, however registration is required for the virtual program. 

 

Oct. 14

6 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Student Roundtable Meetings: Afghanistan and Refugees

Join the NMC student staff for a student-led conversation focusing on a different topic for each one. Pizza and beverages will be provided.

No registration needed

 

Oct. 18

7 p.m.

Virtual Program

"Refugee Resettlement in Brown County: A Panel Discussion and Community Forum"

In partnership with Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Green Bay, the Norman Miller Center for Peace, Justice & Public Understanding is hosting a panel discussion and community forum focusing on refugee resettlement in Brown County. We will be joined by several area experts, including Karmen Lemke (Executive Director, Catholic Charities), Said Hassan (Executive Director, Community Services Agency, Inc. [COMSA]), immigration attorney Sarah Griffiths, and others.
The program, which begins at 7pm on October 18, will be offered virtually via Zoom. 

2020-2021

Sept. 2

1-2:15 p.m.

Virtual Event

Ms. Lillian Medville creator of "Your Privilege is Showing"

Join Associate Professor of Teacher Education at St. Norbert College Erica Southworth as she hosts a virtual conversation with Lillian Medville creator of "Your Privilege is Showing" The fundamental philosophy is that systems of oppression(sexism, racism, privilege, ableism, classism, among others) are both personal and universal. We have all, no matter who we are, internalized and participated in these systems, and are hurt by them in some way. And still, we don't talk about them. This session provides the Brave Space container necessary for direct, and personal conversations to happen and social emotional learning to take place. 

 

Sept. 2 and 3

11 a.m.-
1 p.m.

Baer Mall

Voter Registration Drive and Get Out the Vote Pledge

Stop by Baer Mall to register to vote, ask questions about voting and to take the Get Out the Vote Pledge to score some swag. We will have representatives from COVO to answer questions and get you registered.

 

Sept. 8

12-1:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art in a Democratic Society Lecture Series: Center for Creative Citizenship

The Maryland Institute College of Art’s Center for Creative Citizenship integrates civic learning and action, as well as
democratic engagement, by engaging art and design students in projects relating to civic engagement, voter education, and get out the vote efforts, as well as supporting the development of partnerships, programs, and initiatives that advance the interests of Baltimore’s communities and neighborhoods.

Follow this link for more information.

 

Sept. 17

11 a.m.-
1 p.m..

Baer Mall

U.S. Constitution Day

Stop by and pick up a pocket version of the U.S. Constitution

Sept. 17

7-9 p.m.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Documentary Series: "Pray the Devil Back to Hell"

The film documents a peace movement called Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace. Organized by social worker Leymah Gbowee, the movement started with praying and singing in a fish market. Leymah Gbowee organized the Christian and Muslim women of Monrovia, Liberia to pray for peace and to organize nonviolent protests. Dressed in white to symbolize peace, and numbering in the thousands, the women became a political force against violence and against their government. Their movement led to the election of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf in Liberia, the first African nation with a female president. 

There is limited in-person seating available for this event, please arrive early to assure a seat. Doors will be closed once occupancy is met. Social distance and masking must be observed throughout the duration of the event.

Sept. 21

7 p.m.

Virtual Event

 

"Resilience as a Community" a Miller Lecture event with Leymah Gbowee

Consistent with the purposes of the Norman and Louis Miller Lecture Series, Ms. Gbowee wrote, "In the middle of this heartbreaking pandemic, notice that it is alerting global citizens--regardless of race, status, and accomplishments--to rethink life, our interactions, and attitudes toward "the other" and many more. This moment in our global history has forcibly reminded us of the inevitable truth--we are more connected than we are divided and our humanity is tied in ways that we have sadly allowed ourselves to forget. As we navigate this moment, let us all use our moments of social distancing to think about acts that bring our societies closer when the dust settles."

Ms. Gbowee won the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize and is a Liberian peace activist, social worker and women's rights advocate. She is the founder and President of the Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa. Ms. Gbowee is best known for leading a nonviolent movement of Christian and Muslim women which played a pivotal role in ending the fourteen-year Liberian civil war. 

Q&A with audience to follow.

Click here to view the recording

 

 

Sept. 22

2-4 p.m.

Baer Mall

Voting Information/Education Table

Stop by the voter information/education tables in Baer Mall to connect with Rachel Benck, our CEEP fellow, and COVO about voting questions.  

Sept. 24

7 p.m.

Virtual Event

"From Civility to Justice-Conversations Across the Aisle for Human Dignity and the Common Good" with MT Dàvila

Join MT Davila, Associate Professor of Practice at Merrimack College in North Andover, Massachusetts and president of the Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States (ACHTUS) for this virtual conversation across the aisle.

Dr. Dávila will present a lecture entitled From Civility to Justice: Conversations Across the Aisle for Human Dignity and the Common Good. In this talk she will explore the ways in which an emphasis on civility in the midst of our present political polarization can do great harm to many of the most vulnerable, minoritized, and marginalized populations among us, by allowing continued injustices to be perpetrated against migrant families, trans men and women, religious minorities, and others.  By contrast, in order to restore justice as a core principle of our public discourse, Dr. Dávila argues we must redirect our attention away from civility alone and reevaluate our conceptions of such basic principles of justice as human dignity and the common good.   

This event is co-sponsored by the Killeen Chair of Theology and Philosophy

 

Sept. 29

12-1:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art in a Democratic Society Lecture Series: Amanda Lovelee

Amanda Lovelee is a visual artist based in Minnesota. Lovelee had focused on civic engagement through a variety of projects. She worked as a "City Artist" through The Public Art St. Paul Program developing projects that made city planning more accessible to city residents.

 

Sept. 29

7:30-9:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Presidential Debate Viewing Party

Join other SNC campus members to watch the 2020 Presidential debate. Co-Sponsored by Pi Sigma Alpha, the political science honor society. 

Oct. 1

7:00 p.m.

Virtual Even

Documentary Discussion: "White Right: Meeting the Enemy"

Join us for a discussion of the documentary "White Right: Meeting the Enemy" ahead of Arno Michaelis' event on Oct. 13. Watch the film on your own schedule and join us virtual to discuss it. The documentary is streaming for free on SNC Kanopy

Oct. 7

7:30-9:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

 

Vice Presidential Debate Viewing Party

Join other SNC campus members to watch the 2020 Vice-Presidential debate. Co-Sponsored by Pi Sigma Alpha, the political science honor society. 

 Oct. 13

7-8:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

"The Gift of our Wounds" a conversation with Arno Michaelis

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Arno Michaelis was a founding member of a notorious worldwide racist skinhead organization, a reverend of a self-declared holy war and frontman of the hate-medal band, Centurion, which sold 20,000 CDs by the mid-nineties and is still popular with racists today. Single parenthood, love for his daughter and the forgiveness shown by people he once hated all helped turn Arno's life around, bringing him to embrace diversity  and practice gratitude for all life. After spending over a decade as a successful information technology consultant and entrepreneur, Arno is now a speaker, author of My Life After Hate and very fortunate to be able to share his ongoing process of character development with the world in an effort to counter the cycle of violence he once fueled.

Arno is featured in the Deeyah Kahn documentary "White Right Meeting the Enemy" . This film is available on SNC Kanopy. We recommend viewing the film at your convenience prior to the program.

Click here to view the recording.

 

Oct. 21

3:30-4:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Fr. Gregory Boyle Book Discussion with Bridget Burke Ravizza, Cabrini Jablon, and Becky Lahti 
In anticipation of Fr. Gregory Boyle's virtual visit to SNC as the 2020 St. Norbert Ambassador of Peace (award presentation and lecture on October 27), the Norman Miller Center for Peace, Justice & Public Understanding is hosting a faculty/staff discussion of his book, Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion. Leading this Zoom discussion will be Becky Lahti, Interim Co-Director of the Emmaus Center, Cabrini Jablon, Associate Director of Admission, and Bridget Burke Ravizza, Professor of Theology and Religious Studies. The book discussion will take place on October 21, from 3:30 to 4:30pm. Please follow the link below to register.
The Norman Miller Center will provide free copies of the book for the first 25 SNC faculty or staff members who register and request a copy. If you already have a copy of the book, you will be able to note that on the registration form as well.   
Registration is closed for this discussion.

 

Oct. 21

7-8:15 p.m.

Virtual Event

peakers include Marjan Safinia, Director of And She Could be NextAshley O’Shay, Director of UnapologeticYamila Ruiz, National High Road Director of One Fair WageSonya Renee TaylorThe Body is Not An Apology Author & Activist; and moderated by Astra Taylor, filmmaker, activist & author, most recently of Democracy May Not Exist, But We’ll Miss It When It’s Gone.

Co-hosted by The Norman Miller Center for Peace, Justice & Public Understanding at St. Norbert College, The Menard Center for the Study of Institutions and Innovation at UW Stout & The Wisconsin Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies, and in partnership with Black Leaders Organizing for Communities (BLOC)

These events will provide simultaneous English to Spanish language interpretation and Certified Deaf Interpreters. To access Spanish interpretation, please download the Zoom application to your desktop or mobile device.

These events are intended to be a non-partisan event on the importance of voting. We encourage everyone, regardless of political affiliation, to register to vote and vote in the elections this Fall to help preserve the integrity of our democracy.

 

Oct. 22

7 p.m.

Virtual Event

"Purple: America, We Need to Talk" short film discussion

Join us for a discussion of the short film "Purple" which is about polarized political parties. Watch the film on your own schedule then come to the discussion with an open mind. The film can be viewed through this link

 

Oct. 27

 

7 p.m.

Virtual Event

"The Whole Language: The Power of Extravagant Tenderness" Ambassador of Peace Award with Fr. Gregory Boyle

Fr. Boyle will share what he has learned in three decades working with marginalized populations at Homeboy Industries in Los Angeles, CA--that love is the answer, community is the context and tenderness is the connective tissue. Tenderness reflects the foundational notion that there are no is and them, only us. homeboy seeks to be what the world is invited to become. Kinship cannot happen without tenderness.

A native Angeleno and Jesuit priest, from 1986 to 1992 Father Boyle served as pastor of Dolores Mission Church in Boyle Heights, then the poorest Catholic parish in Los Angeles that also had the highest concentration of gang activity in the city. Father Boyle witnessed the devastating impact of gang violence on his community during the so-called "decade of death" that began in the late 1980s and peaked at 1,000 gang-related killings in 1992. In the face of law enforcement tactics and criminal justice policies of suppression and mass incarceration as the means to end gang violence, he and parish and community members adopted what was a radical approach at the time: treat gang members as human beings

In 1988 they started what would eventually become Homeboy Industries, which employs and trains former gang members in a range of social enterprises, as well as provides critical services to thousands of men and women who walk through its door every year seeking a better life.

Click here to view the recording.

 Nov. 3

Election Day 

Shuttles will be running from 8:30am-4:45pm in a continuous circle departing from the cul du sac between Admissions and the Mulva Library.

 

Nov. 10

12-1:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art in a Democratic Society Lecture: Girl Child Art Foundation

The Girl Child Art Foundation is an organization based in Lagos Nigeria that focuses on advocacy, empowerment, and civic engagement of girls through the arts.

 

Nov. 10

12-1:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

 Discovery of a New Nation: Native Americans and the beginning of the United States: A Conversation with Heather Bruegl, M.A., Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge Munsee Community and an enrolled member of the Oneida Nation

Join Heather Bruegl as she connects to the broad themes of peace, justice, and public understanding. Native History predates 1492. Native peoples have been on the North American continent for centuries before colonization began. Learn about U.S. History but from perspective of Native Americans. From the formation of the Iroquois Confederacy to landing on Plymouth Rock.  From the Lost Colony of Roanoke to the tribes that participated in the American Revolution and the move westward.  Discover the creation of the treaties between the United States and Native Nations.  Finally learn about the beginning of the end for Native Nations with Indian Removal Act and the Trail of Tears.  This lecture begins in the 1100’s and ends just before the Civil War in 1860.

 

Nov. 10

2-3:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

 Documentary Screening of Warrior Women

In the 1970s, with the swagger of unapologetic Indianness, organizers of the American Indian Movement (AIM) fought for Native liberation and survival as a community of extended families.

Warrior Women is the story of Madonna Thunder Hawk, one such AIM leader who shaped a kindred group of activists' children - including her daughter Marcy - into the "We Will Remember" Survival School as a Native alternative to government-run education. Together, Madonna and Marcy fought for Native rights in an environment that made them more comrades than mother-daughter. Today, with Marcy now a mother herself, both are still at the forefront of Native issues, fighting against the environmental devastation of the Dakota Access Pipeline and for Indigenous cultural values.

Through a circular Indigenous style of storytelling, this film explores what it means to navigate a movement and motherhood and how activist legacies are passed down and transformed from generation to generation in the context of colonizing government that meets Native resistance with violence.

Social distancing and masking will be required in the theater and attendance will be limited. 

This program is co-sponsored by Multicultural Student Services and The Council of Indigenous People.

 

Nov. 12

12-1 p.m.

Virtual Event

Madonna Thunder Hawk Q&A

Join Dr. Vicky Tashjian, Professor of History at St. Norbert College as she hosts a Q&A session with Madonna Thunder Hawk. Madonna Thunder Hawk is s a Native American civil rights activist best known as a leader in the American Indian Movement (AIM) and as an organizer against the Dakota Access Pipeline. She is also featured in the documentary Warrior Women. This film is streaming on SNC Kanopy and we encourage all participants to watch the film before the Q&A.

 

Nov. 17

12-1:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art in a Democratic Society Lecture Series: Laurie Jo Reynolds

Laurie Jo Reynolds is an artist, policy advocate, and researcher who developed the concept of “Legislative Art”, an art practice that seeks to intervene in government systems with the goal of concrete political change.

 

Nov. 23

7-8 p.m.

Virtual Event

 "Conversations at Home" 

Returning home after a semester at college can be stressful — even more so after months of political controversy and a pandemic. As you anticipate potentially difficult conversations back home, this virtual panel discussion will offer suggestions for a peaceful and productive transition. Please join the conversation with Dr. Jennifer Hockenbery (Dean of Humanities), Dr. Bruce Robertson (Director of Counseling and Career Development), Tanner Anderson (Area Coordinator and LGBTQ+ Support Services Coordinator), Derek Elkins (Interim Co-Director of the Emmaus Center), Dr. Robert Pyne (Director of the Norman Miller Center), and Bethany Kreklow (Student Community Organizer, Norman Miller Center).
 

 

Nov. 29

6-7:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Celebrate the Living Legacy of Dorothy Day: a Hunger for God,  a Striving for Goodness, a Passion for Justice

Join David Brooks, Anne Snyder and Paul Elie for a conversation about Dorothy Day. Together they will reflect on how, in a time of pandemic and strife, 40 years after her death, Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker inspire holiness and community.

This event is sponsored by the Dorothy Day Guild.

 

Jan. 26

6:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

"Mythbusters: How Textbook Pictures 'Whitewash' Religious History" hosted by Dr. Erica Southworth, Associate Professor of Education

Pictures tell a 1,000 words….and what we learn from textbook pictures is purposefully designed to shape our (biased) perspectives on race and gender. This is especially true when we look at images found in K-12+ textbooks. In history texts, for example, why are Moses, Jesus, Mary, and Mohammed all mythically depicted as white Europeans instead of depicted accurately as North Africans or Southwest Asians? And why are images of Sarah, Hagar, or Khadīja absent altogether? In short, why do 21st century textbooks strip ancient religious founders of their racial identities while simultaneously reinforcing gender-based hierarchies? 

Join Dr. Erica Southworth (SNC Teacher Education), Ms. Melonie Zielinski (Port Washington High School), and Ms. Haley Herbst (St. John Bosco Catholic Middle School) in their interactive “Mythbusters!” presentation to learn more about these imagery social injustices. Presentation attendees will also have the opportunity to participate in imagery analysis activities to help hone their own personal and professional racial and gender myth-busting skills. 

 Feb. 10

6:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

"Homegrown Hate & Domestic Terrorism" with Daryl Johnson

Daryl Johnson is one of the foremost experts on domestic extremist groups in the US. He is currently the founder of DT Analytics, a private consulting firm for law enforcement. He is regularly cited, featured, or quoted in media covering domestic extremist groups in the US, including the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, to name a few. Johnson is also a freelance writer for various media and civil rights organizations. In 2012, he testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on hate crimes and the threat of domestic extremism. Also joining the discussion this evening will be Dr. Robert Pyne, Director of the Norman Miller Center, and political science professors Dr. Wendy Scattergood and Dr. Angel Saavedra Cisneros.

This program is co- hosted by The Wisconsin Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies and We Are Many, United Against Hate.

Follow this link to view the video from this program.

 Feb. 18

12:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art, Technology and Society Lecture Series with Mark Tribe

Mark Tribe is a New York-based artist and Graduate Programs Chair at the 

School of the Visual Arts in New York. His drawings, performances, installations, and photographs often deal with social and political issues. His recent work explores the relationship between landscape and technology. He is the author of two books, The Port Huron Project: Reenactments of New Left Protest Speeches (Charta, 2010) and New Media Art (Taschen, 2006).

 

March 2

6:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

“Fight like Hell: Redefining Incitement in the 21st Century”

As we heard repeatedly during this month's impeachment trial of former president Donald Trump, incitement to violence is not protected speech under the First Amendment. But what is incitement? Since 1969, the standard legal definition has been drawn from a Supreme Court case, Brandenburg v. Ohio: incitement is to encourage other people toward actions that are imminent, intended, lawless, and likely. After over 50 years, should this standard be reconsidered? Is it still relevant in the Internet age? What is the meaning of incitement in 2021? Join us for a virtual panel discussion featuring: JoAnne Sweeny, JD, PhD, Professor of Law at the Louis D. Brandeis School of Law, University of Louisville; Eric Kasper, JD, PhD, Professor of Political Science at UW-Eau Claire, and Alan Bigel, PhD, Professor of Political Science and Public Administration at UW La Crosse.

This program is co-sponsored by The Menard Center for Constitutional Studies at UWEC and The Menard Center for the Study of Institutions and Innovation at UW Stout.

View the program here.

 March 8

7:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

 

Inspiring Female Leaders Panel Discussion

This event will highlight unique females in the Green Bay community who have fascinating stories to share about career development, community involvement, personal and professional growth, and how they inspire and empower other women!

The panel includes:

Joidon Jennings — Green Bay Packers UX Coordinator; Networking Expert
Marissa Michalkiewicz — Founder of Giveadaam Ventures; Sustainability expert in the Green Bay Community
Kristina Shelton — Wisconsin’s 90th Assembly District Representative; 
Abby Gildernik — Assistant Athletics Director at SNC

 

 

March 10

6:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

"Fratelli Tutti: Pope Francis' Letter on Friendship" 

In his third encyclical, Fratelli tutti, Pope Francis reflects on a topic of great importance: human solidarity and friendship. Following his election to the papacy, Pope Francis first greeted the world with the words fratelli e sorelle - "brothers and sisters." In this encyclical, he continues to address all men and women as his brothers and sisters, calling us to consider what our common brotherhood requires of us.

Join us for a panel discussion with St. Norbert Theology and Religious Studies Professors Dr. Tom Bolin, Dr. Karen Park and Dr. Howard Ebert moderated by St. Norbert Divisional Dean of Humanities Dr. Jennifer Hockenberry And senior Theology and Religious Studies student Cole Johnson as they examine different aspect of the encyclical. The panel discussion will conclude with a Q&A period.

 

March 11

12:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art, Technology and Society Lecture Series with Constance Hockaday

Constance Hockaday is a Chilean American artist whose work explores issues of public space, political voice, and belonging. Hockaday holds both an MFA in Socially Engaged Art and a Masters in Conflict Resolution. She is a TED Fellow and an artist in residence at UCLA. She has received support from the Rauschenberg Foundation, Map Fund, SF MOMA, Rainin Foundation, and Headland’s Center for the Arts.

Follow this to link to register.

 

March 25

12:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art, Technology and Society Lecture Series With jackie sumell

jackie sumell is a multidisciplinary artist and activist whose work interrogates the abuses of the American criminal justice system. She is best known for her collaborative project with the late Herman Wallace, one of the former Angola 3 prisoners, entitled The House That Herman Built. This project is the subject of the critically acclaimed documentary film Herman’s House. Sumell is a 2013 Open Society Soros Justice Fellow, a 2015 Nathan Cummings Foundation Recipient, a 2015 Eyebeam Project Fellow, and a 2016 Robert Rauchenberg Artist as Activist Fellow.  

 

March 29

6:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Voter Education Discussion

Wondering why you should vote in the spring election on April 6th or what's on the ballot?
Join us for a virtual panel discussion featuring Political Science Professors and Students from St. Norbert College

March 30

6:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

"Nonviolence: An Interfaith Conversation"

This program will feature presentations from four advocates of nonviolence, each describing the contribution of faith traditions to their perspective. Panelists will be Pardeep Singh Kaleka, Executive Director of Interfaith Conference of Greater Milwaukee and Executive Director of the Zeidler Group, which promotes dialogue across lines of difference; David Mueller, a former resident of the Catholic Worker and co-founder of the Dorothy Day Canonization Network; Jim Handley, certified Kingian nonviolence trainer and Senior Lecturer in Peace Studies at UW Stout; and Dr. Elliot Ratzman, Assistant Professor in the Religious Studies Department of Grinnell College, where he teaches courses in Judaism and Peace and Conflict Studies

April 6

12:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art, Technology and Society Lecture Series with Jonas Lund

Jonas Lund is a Swedish conceptual artist whose work critically reflects on ccontemporary networked systems and power structures. Lund's artistic practice involves creating systems and setting up parameters that oftentimes require engagement from the viewer. This results in game-like artworks where tasks are executed according to algorithms or a set of rules. Through his works, Lund investigates the issues generated by the increasing digitalization of contemporary society like authorship, participation, and authority.

 

April 8

7:00 p.m.
Lecture

Walter Theatre/Virtual Event

Spring Miller Lecture "Norbert of Xanten: The Enduring Relevance of a 950 year old Peacemaker" with Thomas Kunkel, president emeritus of St. Norbert College

Norbert, similar to the Miller Lecture Series, promoted unity, communication and tolerance among different cultures, ethnicities and traditions. Join Tom Kunkel as he examines what Norbert was doing in his time and how these kinds of outreach and peacemaking are needed more than ever today.

April 22

11a.m.-1 p.m.

Baer Mall

Earth Day 2021

Join us in Baer Mall to learn more about what you can do to be sustainable and reduce your single use plastic use. We will be handing out reusable bags designed by the NMC's Community Organizer Cara Orbell. These bags are manufactured from pre-consumer waste generated by factories during the fabric cutting process. Through a partnership with 1% For The Planet one percent of sales of this bag will be donated to nonprofits dedicated to protecting the planet. We will also have Earth Day stickers and lots of conversation. 

April 22

12:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art, Technology and Society Lecture Series with Claudia X. Valdes

Claudia X. Valdes a conceptual visual artist and educator who explores the themes of trauma, memory, perception, and embodiment in her work. Major subjects within her works have been the history of U.S. nuclear arms, physical trauma, violent conflict, and positing art as a means to both catalyze and frame social spaces for meaningful discourse and to evoke reflection upon the ethics of human decision-making and actions and their impact on individual and collective life.

2019-2020

Sept. 6 4:30 p.m.-6 p.m. Campus Center Gym

SNC “Celebrity” Basketball Game to End Family Separation and Detention 

Multicultural Student Services and the Norman Miller Center will host a basketball game featuring a bucket raffle. All proceeds from the ticket sales and raffle will go to RAICES and Freedom for Immigrants. Tickets available at the door $5/students and $10/Faculty and Staff. 

Sept. 17 11:30 a.m..-1 p.m.

Ruth's Marketplace Lobby

U.S. Constitution Day

We will be distributing copies of the U.S. Constitution during lunch hours outside of Ruth’s Marketplace

Sept. 17 
6 p.m. Reception

7 p.m. Lecture

FK Bemis International Center

Ambassador of Peace Award with Robyn Davis

Reception
Hendrickson Dining room, Bemis International Center

Lecture
Fort Howard Theater, Bemis International Center

Sept. 20

8 a.m.

St. Norbert College Grounds

Hiroshima Peace Tree Planting

Sept. 21

10 a.m..-4 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

SNC Day – International Day of Peace

Join us for an open house with refreshments and children's activities celebrating the International Day of Peace. Representatives from the Coalition of Voting Organizations of Brown County will also be on hand to conduct voter registration. 

Oct. 8
6 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable Conversation: “Right to Life: Will Human Rights Survive Climate Change?”

Join us for a roundtable conversation, pizza will be provided

Oct. 10 
7 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

“The Middle East and the West: the Future of Human Rights” Lecture and Panel Discussion

Micheline Ishay, Ph.D. author of “The Levant Express: The Arab Uprising, Human Rights and the Future of the Middle East” charts bold and realistic pathways for human rights in a region beset by political repression. economic distress, sectarian conflict, refugee crisis and violence to women. With attention to how patterns of revolution and counterrevolution play out in different societies and historical contexts, Ishay reveals the progressive potential of subterranean human rights forces and offers strategies for transforming current realities in the Middle East. 

Panel discussion with Daniel Stoll, Ph.D and David Coury, Ph. D. to follow.

Oct. 22
6 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable Conversation: “Can He Say That? Free Speech v. Hate Speech”

Join us for a roundtable conversation, pizza will be provided. 

Oct. 29

5:30 p.m. Reception

7 p.m. Lecture

Walter Theatre

“Resisting Hate Through Public Understanding: A 25th Anniversary Celebration of the Miller Lecture”

Invite Only Reception
Michels Commons Ballroom

Lecture
Walter Theatre

Nov. 5 

6 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

Mulva Library Presentation Room

Roundtable Conversation: “Disqualify Them: Should Transgender Athletes be Allowed to Compete?”

Join us for a roundtable conversation, pizza will be provided.

Nov. 12-13

St. Norbert College

Las Cafeteras Residency

“Racism: Ain’t Nobody Got Time for That”
Nov. 12, 7 p.m. Fort Howard Theater, FK Bemis International Center

Concert
Nov. 13, 7 p.m. Walter Theatre

Nov. 19 6p.m.-7:30 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable Conversation: "Lock 'Em up or Set "Em Loose:Who Belongs in Prison"

Nov. 21
6:30-8 p.m.

Norbertine Center for Spirituality at The St. Norbert Abbey

The Impact of Homelessness: A Community's Response

Facilitator: Tony Pichler
Panelists: Robyn Davis, Executive Director, United Way of Brown County
               Michelle Frampton, Director, Brown County Homeless and Housing Coalition
               John Zakowski, Brown County Circuit Judge

Cost: Free will offering(suggested donation $5)

 Feb. 4
7 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Documentary Series "Revolution of the Heart: The Dorothy Day Story"

This film profiles one of the most extraordinary and courageous women in American history. She was the co-founder of the Catholic Worker Movement that began as a newspaper to expose rampant injustices during the Great Depression. It soon expanded to become a network of houses of hospitality to welcome the poor and destitute. Revolution of the Heart includes rare archival photographs and film footage plus interviews with actor/activist Martin Sheen, public theologian Cornel West, popular author Joan Chittister, Jim Wallis of Sojourners and many more.

Discussion to follow the screening with director Martin Doblmeier

Feb. 18
7 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Documentary Series: "True Justice: Bryan Stevenson's Fight for Equality"

The film follows 30 years of Equal Justice Initiative's work on behalf of the poor, the incarcerated and the condemned. Told primarily in his own word, True Justice shares Bryan Stevenson's experience with a criminal justice system that "treats you better if you're rich and guilty than if you're poor and innocent." The burden of facing this system is explored in candid interviews with associated, close family members and clients.

Panel discussion to follow the screening

Feb. 20
11 a.m.- 1:00 p.m.

Michels Commons Lobby

Better Together Day Celebration

Better Together celebrates interfaith dialogue and service on campuses around the country. Join us in the lobby of Michels Commons to share your interfaith thoughts and pick up some interfaith swag.

Feb. 28
6:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Documentary Series: "Normie: The Illusion of Normal, the beauty of love."

When Annemarie looks in the mirror, she sees Down Syndrome. She hate it. To her, the diagnosis is a giant barricade keeping her from the independence and intimacy she desires. She embarks on a journey of self discovery as she tries to understand what it means to be normal.

Co-sponsored by SNC Best Buddies and Down Syndrome Association of Wisconsin.

March 5
3:30 p.m.

Mulva Presentation Room 101

"Beit Sahour: City of the 'Shepherd's Field' between Israel and Palestine" a talk with Dr. Robert Kramer

Dr. Kramer, Professor of History, returned this semester after a sabbatical in the Middle East. Join us as he shares his experience.

March 10
6-7:30 p.m.

Mulva Library First Floor Flex Space

Roundtable Conversation: "Consent Beyond Sex: Trusting Relationships and Boundary Maintenance"

Join us for a student led, student focused roundtable conversation, in partnership with SGA and the Mulva Library.

April 20
7 p.m.

Virtual Screening

50th Anniversary of Earth Day Documentary "The Human Element"

Join us for a virtual screening of "The Human Element" with a post-screening discussion via Zoom. THis documentary follows environmental photographer, James Balog, as he travels the United States and captures the stories of everyday Americans on the frontline of climate change.

This event is co-sponsored by the Wisconsin Conservation Voters.

2018-2019

Aug. 23-24
8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Community Organizing 101
Featuring Dennis Donovan
National Director for Public Achievement, Sabo Center for Democracy and Citizenship, Augsburg College

Sept. 4-6
10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Voter Registration Drive

For more information about voting at St. Norbert College, see our Voting Information page.

Sept. 12
11 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Council on Foreign Relations Conference Call Series

The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
Speaker: Philip H. Gordon
CFR’s Middle East Program and Europe

For more information, visit the CFR webpage.

Sept. 18
6:00-7:30 p.m.

Campus Center Lounge

Roundtable Conversation: The Cost of Higher Education

Sept. 19
11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Council on Foreign Relations Conference Call Series

The Rise of Authoritarian Nationalism
Speaker: Madeleine K. Albright
Albright Stonebridge Group; Albright Capital Management LLC; and Georgetown University

For more information, visit the CFR webpage.

Sept. 20
6:30-8 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Action in Recovery: Addressing the Opioid Crisis in Brown County

In partnership with organizations with expertise and experience in opioid addiction and recovery, St. Norbert College is hosting a free community education event focusing on the opioid epidemic in Wisconsin and Brown County. The evening begins with a resource/information fair. The featured program will begin thereafter with the keynote speaker, Paul Krupski, Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Director of Opioid Initiatives. The program ends with a community panel question/answer discussion.

Sept. 22
10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

SNC Day — International Day of Peace Celebration

Join us for an open house with refreshments and children’s activities celebrating the International Day of Peace.

Sept. 26
7-9 p.m.

Walter Theater

Scott Ainslie in Concert

As a traditional musician with expertise in Piedmont and Delta Blues as well as Southern Appalachian fiddle and banjo traditions, Ainslie has specialized in performing and presenting programs on the European and African roots of American music and culture in community and educational settings. Ainslie came of age during the Civil Rights era, and cultivated a powerful affinity for cross-cultural exchange. He has studied with elder musicians on both sides of the color line – in the Old-Time Southern Appalachian fiddle and banjo traditions, as well as Black Gospel and Blues. He plays this music with affection, authority, and power. His performances present a wonderful palette of sounds and stories that will delight the ear, awaken the mind, and satisfy the heart.

 

Oct. 2
6-7:30 p.m.

Campus Center Lounge

Roundtable Conversation: Gender Rights and Feminism

Oct. 3
11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Council on Foreign Relations Conference Call Series

Africa’s Strategic Partners
Speaker: Reuben E. Brigety II
George Washington University

For more information, visit the CFR webpage.

Oct. 10
7-8:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

"Why is Sectarian Conflict on the Rise in the Middle East?" A lecture by Danny Postel

As the Middle East descends further and further into a maelstrom of violence and state breakdown, the new conventional wisdom in Western media and policy circles attributes the turmoil to supposedly ancient sectarian hatreds, primordial forces that make violent conflict inevitable and intractable. In this narrative, “sectarianism” possesses trans-historical causal power and serves as a catch-all explanation for the troubles plaguing the region. In this presentation, Danny Postel, Assistant Director of the Middle East and North African Studies Program at Northwestern University, will challenge this new conventional wisdom and suggest an alternative explanation for the recent spike in sectarian violence in the Middle East. He will show how various conflicts in the region have morphed from non-sectarian (and cross-sectarian) and nonviolent movements into sectarian battles and civil wars.

October 16
6-7:30 p.m.

Campus Center Lounge

Roundtable Conversation: Social Media, Technology, and Data Collection

Oct. 17
11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Council on Foreign Relations Conference Call Series

Global Cooperation on Migration
Speaker: Katharine M. Donato
Georgetown University

For more information, visit the CFR webpage.

Oct. 23
6:00 p.m. Reception
7 p.m. Lecture

Bemis International Center

Ambassador of Peace Award with Sean Callaghan 

Reception, 6pm
Hendrickson Dining Room, Bemis International Center

Lecture, 7pm
Fort Howard Theater, Bemis International Center

Oct. 24
7-9:00pm

Fort Howard Theater

"One Vote" — the documentary, with producer Christine Woodhouse

 

Filmed in five locations on a single day, One Vote captures the compelling stories of diverse voters on Election Day 2016. At times funny, surprising and heart-wrenching, the film eschews partisan politics in favor of an honest portrayal. Producer Christine Woodhouse will be present for the screening, and she will take questions after the film.

 

Oct. 25
6-7:30 p.m.

Campus Center Lounge

Roundtable Conversation: Refugees

Oct. 30
5:30 p.m. Reception
7 p.m. Lecture

Bemis International Center

Miller Lecture with Gary Dorrien

Reception
Hendrickson Dining Room, Bemis International Center

Lecture
Fort Howard Theater, Bemis International Center

Oct. 31
11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Council on Foreign Relations Conference Call Series

The Increasing Complexity of U.S. National Intelligence
Speaker: Michael P. Dempsey
CFR

For more information, visit the CFR webpage.

Nov. 1
7:30p.m - 9 p.m.

Cofrin 15

"Whats on My Ballot?" 
Learn more about this year's election in this non-partisan event, with information about the offices contested, the work they perform, and the candidates seeking your vote. 

Nov. 6

Between Mulva Library and Ariens Family Welcome Center

Election Day
An all day "Vote Together" party with shuttles running to the polls. For more information about registration and voting, see our Voting Information page. 

Nov. 7
6 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable Conversation: Legal Biases

Nov. 12
6 p.m. - 8:45 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

"Tickling Giants"

The film "Tickling Giants" tells the story of Dr. Bassem Youssef, the "Egyptian Jon Stewart", who decides to leave his job as a heart surgeon and become a late-night comedian. The movie is about how he finds creative, non-violent ways to protect free speech and fight a president who abuses his power. After the film, we will talk with the producer, Sarah Taksler, by Skype.

  • “An ebullient ode to freedom… a terrific movie” - Variety

  • “First-rate documentary” - The New York Times

  • “Fascinating…  a vivid personal portrait” The Hollywood Reporter

  • “A beautiful, funny, charming, insightful, laugh until your cry, and then cry until you laugh film”- Huffington Post

Nov. 14
11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Council on Foreign Relations Conference Call Series

U.S. Economic Security and the Future of Work
Speaker: Cecilia Elena Rouse
Princeton University

For more information, visit the CFR webpage.

Nov. 19
6 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable Conversation: The Stigmatization of Mental Health Issues

Nov. 28
11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Council on Foreign Relations Conference Call Series

Xi Jinping Power Profile
Speaker: Elizabeth C. Economy
CFR’s Asia Program

For more information, visit the CFR webpage.

Dec. 4
6 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable Conversation: Human Trafficking

Jan. 29
7 p.m.

Birder Hall

"Etty"-canceled due to weather
Etty is a one-women play based on the diaries of Etty Hillesum, adapted and performed by Susan Stein and directed by Austin Pendelton. 

For more information, visit the Etty webpage

Feb. 28
7 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

"This is Home"
A Documentary about the experience of Refugees

March 12
7-8:30 p.m.

Mulva Presentation Room

"Peacemaking: Being Human in a Time of Permanent War"

A lecture by Brian Terrell

Co-coordinator of Voices for Creative Nonviolence and member of the Catholic Worker Movement for more than 40 years

March 14
6 p.m.

Roundtable: An Open Dialogue
Pharmaceuticals and Healthcare

March 28
7-8:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Documentary Night

"Escape from Room 18"
A documentary that follows ex-Neo Nazis, John Daly and Kevin Connell, as they visit concentration camps in an effort to make amends with their past selves.

April 3
6-7:30 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable: An Open Dialogue
Voting Rights

April 5
8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Wisconsin Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies Annual Student-Faculty Conference

Forced Migration and Human Flourishing

 April 9

5:30 p.m Reception 


7:00 p.m.
Lecture

Bemis International Center

Miller Lecture with Susan Brooks Thistlethwaite

Reception: Hendrickson Dining Room

Lecture: Fort Howard Theater

April 24

6:00 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable: An Open Dialogue Forum
Guns and Firearms

2017-18

Date   Event
Sept. 16, 2017 SNC Day
Sept. 27, 2017 Council on Foreign Relations - Fall 2017 Academic Conference Call Series

“The Role of the United Nations in Global Governance”

Speaker: Samantha Power
Harvard University
Sept. 27, 2017 "Welcoming Refugees: A Community Conversation
The Norman Miller Center hosted a conversation about refugee integration in communities. Honored guests included representatives from Sweden and a co-founder of COMSA, a local Somali resource organization.
Sept. 28, 2017 Documentary Night!

"The White Helmets"
A Netflix documentary that follows a group of Syrian first responders as they risk their lives in the midst of violence in Syria and Turkey.
Oct. 11, 2017 Council on Foreign Relations - Fall 2017 Academic Conference Call Series

“U.S.-Latin America Relations

Speaker: Shannon K. O'Neil
Council on Foreign Relations 
Oct. 17, 2017

The Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding

“Which Common Good? Rethinking Religion, Self-Interest and Agency”

By Joerg Rieger, Ph.D.
Cal Turner Chancellor's Chair of Wesleyan Studies 
Distinguished Professor of Theology, Vanderbilt University
View the lecture recording.

Oct. 25, 2017 Council on Foreign Relations - Fall 2017 Academic Conference Call Series

“Dashed Hopes of the Arab Spring

Speaker: Steven A. Cook
Council on Foreign Relations
Oct. 25, 2017

Breaking Barriers in Fashion
Mariah Idrissi is the world’s first hijab wearing model to be signed to ‘Select’ models and featured in a global campaign for H&M. As well as a model, she is an international public speaker promoting female empowerment and is part of a growing movement bringing modest fashion to the masses regardless of faith or background.
Oct. 26, 2017 Documentary Night!

"13th"
A Netflix documentary that explores racial inequality in the United States with a particular focus on the disproportionate representation of African-Americans in U.S. prisons.
Nov. 6, 2017 Slave: A Human Trafficking Survivor Finds Life
Jabali Smith was a 6-yr-old in Berkeley, California when he was trafficked along with his sister over the border into Mexico and held captive by a messianic doomsday sex cult. Smith sharde his journey as a child slave; the escape and the eventual rise from the ashes of tragedy. A story of unimaginable suffering followed by the discovery of success, love, compassion and forgiveness.
Nov. 8, 2017 Council on Foreign Relations - Fall 2017 Academic Conference Call Series

“Conflict Prevention and Mitigation

Speaker: Paul B. Stares
Council on Foreign Relations
Nov. 8, 2017 Jews, Christians and Muslims in the Holy Land
Dr. Robert Kramer
Professor of History
St. Norbert College

This lecture surveyed the history of inter-faith relations in Palestine, from the advent of Islam in the 7th century, through the era of the Ottoman Empire, up to the present, with particular emphasis on the modern period. It also included observations and images from the 2016 and 2017 St. Norbert College summer trips to Israel and the West Bank.
Nov. 15, 2017 Council on Foreign Relations - Fall 2017 Academic Conference Call Series

“Revolutionary Movements and International Relations

Speaker: Jack A. Goldstone
George Mason University
Nov. 28, 2017 Crossfading Wisconsin
Should 19-year-olds be able to drink? Should Wisconsin legalize marijuana? Wisconsin lawmakers have been debating this question, and the answer could affect you. A discussion of these questions.
Nov. 29, 2017 Council on Foreign Relations - Fall 2017 Academic Conference Call Series

“The State of the World

Speaker: Richard N. Haass
President, Council on Foreign Relations 
Nov. 30, 2017 Documentary Night!

Winter on Fire: Ukraine's Fight for Freedom
A Netflix documentary about a civil rights movement in Ukraine that erupts after a peaceful, student protest turns violent.
Dec. 10, 2017 International Human Rights Day
Jan. 26, 2018 Holocaust Remembrance Day
Jeffrey Gingold is the son of a survivor of the Warsaw Ghetto and author of "Tunnel, Smuggle, Collect: A Holocaust Boy," a biography based upon the hidden video and audio recordings of interviews with his father and grandmother. Gingold is an outspoken advocate for Holocaust education who discusses his father's epic survival and unforeseen life twists in the Warsaw Ghetto.
Feb. 23, 2018 St. Norbert Ambassador of Peace Award Presentation, Reception and Lecture
Harry Boyte, Senior Scholar in Public Work Philosophy at the Sabo Center for Democracy and Citizenship at Augsburg College and Founder of the International Youth Citizenship Initiative in Public Achievement, was honored as the recipient of the 2017 Ambassador of Peace Award. The event included an award ceremony, reception and lecture. 
Feb. 24, 2018 Conference: “Invigorating Democracy and Public Work
The conference will feature Harry Boyte (Augsburg College), Micheline Ishay (University of Denver), Harvey Kaye (UW-Green Bay), Alison Staudinger (UW-Green Bay) and more. Students are invited to submit poster projects on the conference theme, with the poster session running concurrently with lunch and breakouts. 
Feb. 26 - March 29, 2018 Oliver Ressler Exhibition – Catastrophe Bonds
March 1, 2018 Panel Discussion - "Visual Art, Social Action, and Grassroots Democracy"
In conjunction with the exhibition Oliver Ressler - Catastrophe Bonds, a multi-site survey of the work of Austrian artist Oliver Ressler in the galleries at St. Norbert College and the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, this panel aimed to examine the current state of aesthetics and politics in light of recent social movements and contemporary challenges to democracy. 
Moderator: Katie Ries
Panelists:
Laurie Beth Clark, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Nicolas Lampert, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Oliver Ressler, international visiting scholar
March 22, 2018 The Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding

“Disturbing Aesthetics of Race”

By M. Shawn Copeland, Ph.D.
Professor of Systematic Theology
Boston College
View the lecture recording.
April 9-13, 2018

The Mystical Arts of Tibet - Mandala Sand Painting
Tibetan Monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery
The Mandala is a sacred cosmogram used as an object of contemplation. It depicts the pure nature of the world in which we live as well as how we can live most effectively.

April 10, 2018

“The Symbolism of the Sand Mandala”
Tibetan Monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery

April 10, 2018 Better Together Day
Better Together Day celebrateds interfaith dialogue and service on campuses around the country. Part of the Interfaith Youth Core, Better Together Day events vary every year and at every campus.
April 12, 2018

The Mystical Arts of Tibet - Sacred Music and Dance
Performance by the Tibetan Monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery

April 22, 2018 Earth Day
April 25, 2018

“Jews, Christians and Muslims in the Holy Land: Part Two, The Modern Era”
Dr. Robert Kramer
Professor of History
St. Norbert College

This talk explained the historical background to the conflict in Paletsine since the late Ottoman era, with a special emphasis on the later 20th century.

2016-17

Date   Event
Aug. 31, 2016
Solidarity in a Time of Bias, Hate and Violence
Sept. 6 - 8, 2016
Voter Registration Drive
Sept. 8, 2016
"The True Cost" - Film screening and discussion
Sponsored by Fashion This Series
Sept. 16, 2016 U.S. Constitution Day
Sept. 22, 2016
2016 St. Norbert Ambassador of Peace Award Presentation and Reception
Presented to Shirlyn Miller in recognition of her steadfast support of peace and justice initiatives in our community.
Sept. 21, 2016 International Day of Peace
Sept. 22, 2016
The Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding

“The Word Peace and the Word Justice, and Why Sometimes the Peacemakers Are Blessed (But Only Sometimes)”

William Miller
Thomas G. Long Professor of Law
University of Michigan

Sept. 26, 2016
First Presidential Debate Watch Party
Oct. 3, 2016

Visual Art and Social Statements
Fr. Jim Neilson, O.Praem., Assistant Professor of Art
Brandon BauerAssistant Professor of Art 

The panel discussed the history of art and social engagement with a focus on primary historic and contemporary examples of artists engaging with the social issues of their time. 

Oct. 4, 2016
Vice Presidential Debate Watch Party
Oct. 9, 2016  Second Presidential Debate Watch Party
Oct. 24, 2016
“The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Up Close and Personal”
Robert Kramer, Ph.D.
Professor of History
St. Norbert College
Oct. 29, 2016
Nonviolence Training Day: Developing the Skills for Social Change
Jim Handley, UW-Stout
Co-sponsored by The Norman Miller Center and Wisconsin Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies 
Nov. 8, 2016 Election Day
Nov. 8, 2016

Election Watch Party
Nov. 10, 2016
Salam Neighbor - Film Viewing
”Salam (Hello) Neighbor“ is a film and campaign to connect the world to refugees. The film follows the journey of Chris and Zach as the first filmmakers ever allowed to be registered and given a tent inside Za'atari, the Jordanian refugee camp near the Syrian border, which is home to over 80,000 Syrian refugees. 
Nov. 30, 2016
What Can a President Do?
The 2016 presidential election prompted a national conversation about what President-Elect Trump actually has the power to change during his presidency. In this program, we looked at what power the American president actually has, and what citizens can do to either support or oppose changes. 
Feb. 1, 2017 2017 Israel/Palestine Trip Meeting
A meeting for students about the summer 2017 trip to Israel and Palestine.
Feb. 23, 2017

Dorothy Day: The World Will Be Saved by Beauty - a book discussion
Kate Hennessy

March 2, 2017 The Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding“Growing up Palestinian in Israel: One Man's Journey from Revenge to Reconciliation”
Aziz Abu Sarah, co-founder and co-CEO of MEJDI Tours
View the recording.
March 7, 2017 "Seeking Refuge" 
An open house gallery and interactive discussion about the refugee journey through the eyes of children. Featured the artwork and stories of refugee children from various conflict zones. Our interactive discussion, consisted of reflections from Dr. Pyne (Norman Miller Center), Dr. Osgood (Education) and Dr. Yesiltas (Political Science), all of whom have experience working with refugees or studying the recent wave of refugees into Europe.
March 8, 2017 Peace Corps Information Session
Jason Lemberg, regional recruiter for Peace Corps
March 23, 2017 ”What's in your water?“ Drinking Water Contamination in Wisconsin: A Panel Discussion
Co-sponsored with the Wisconsin League of Conservation Voters
March 27, 2017 The Mitzvah Project: A One-Person Play and Lecture
Roger Grunwald
March 30-31, 2017 Wisconsin Institute for Peace & Conflict Studies Conference
Gender, Peace, and Conflict: Toward a Deeper Understanding
An interdisciplinary conference for students and faculty at Alverno College in Milwaukee.
April 6, 2017 Better Together Day
Better Together Day celebrates interfaith dialogue and service on campuses around the country. Part of the Interfaith Youth Core, Better Together Day events vary every year and at every campus.
April 28, 2017 Arbor Day - Tree Planting Ceremony

2015-16

Date    Event
Sept. 15, 2015

2016 Israel/Palestine Trip Meeting
A meeting for students about the summer 2016 trip to Israel and Palestine.

Sept. 19, 2015
SNC Day 
Sept. 21, 2015
International Day of Peace

 
Sept. 24, 2015
Livestream of Pope Francis' Address to Congress
Co-sponsored by the Norman Miller Center, the Norbertine Center for Spirituality, and the Green Bay Diocese
Sept. 24, 2015

“Imagining Heschel”: Catholicism and Other Religions, a Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding
Colin Greer, author and president of the New World Foundation

A reading of a short play by Colin Greer about Rabbi Abraham Heschel's dialogue with Catholic leaders during the Second Vatican Council. This event marked the 50th anniversary of Nostra Aetate, the Council's historic statement about Judaism and other religions.

Sept. 25, 2015
Livestream of Pope Francis' Address to the United Nations and Interfaith Service
Co-sponsored by the Norman Miller Center, the Norbertine Center for Spirituality and the Diocese of Green Bay.

The Pope addressed the United Nations General Assembly and he then participated in an interfaith prayer service at the 9/11 memorial.

Sept. 27, 2015

Eid al Adha Celebration

Sept. 29, 2015

2015 St. Norbert Ambassador of Peace Award Presentation and Reception
Presented to Victor Ochen, founder of the African Youth Initiative Network and nominee for the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize.

Oct. 6, 2015
2016 Israel/Palestine Trip Meeting
A meeting for students about the summer 2016 trip to Israel and Palestine.
Oct. 6, 2015
Social Justice Fair
Oct. 20, 2015
Panel Discussion on Laudato Si
The first of three panel discussions regarding the new papal encyclical, which deals with climate change. The focus was on economic implications of climate change. 
Nov. 4, 2015 Peace Corps Information Session
Brett Heimann, Regional Recruiter for the Peace Corps Regional Office  
Nov. 10, 2015
Be the Change You Want to See: Introduction to Community Organizing
Dennis Donovan from Public Achievement
Nov. 12, 2015

We Can't Look Away: A Conversation About the World Refugee Crisis

Nov. 17, 2015
Panel Discussion on Laudato Si
The second of three panel discussions regarding the new papal encyclical, which deals with climate change. The focus was on religious implications of the encyclical.  
Nov. 16-20, 2015  International Education Week
Nov. 23, 2015
Fair Trade Expo
Dec. 8, 2015
2016 Israel/Palestine Trip Meeting
A meeting for students about the summer 2016 trip to Israel and Palestine.

Dec. 10, 2015

Human Rights Day

Feb. 3. 2016
"Trials of Spring" - film viewing
A feature-length documentary. Six short films. Nine women fighting for peace.
Feb. 8, 2016
2016 Israel/Palestine Trip Meeting
A meeting for students about the summer 2016 trip to Israel and Palestine.
Feb. 9. 2016
Panel Discussion on Laudato Si
The final panel discussion regarding the new papal encyclical, which deals with climate change. The focus was on the political impact of climate change.
Feb. 29-April 1, 2016  “Enslaved: A Visual Story of Modern Day Slavery”
A gallery exhibition of photography by Lisa Kristine
March 1, 2016
“The Faces of Modern Day Slavery,” a Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding
Lisa Kristine, humanitarian photographer
March 29, 2016  Fair and Ethical Trade: Working Alongside Catholic Relief Services to Create Sustainable Change
April 7, 2016 Better Together Day
Better Together Day celebrates interfaith dialogue and service on campuses around the country. Part of the Interfaith Youth Core, Better Together Day events vary every year and at every campus.
April 20, 2016
Grad school? Peace Corps? How about BOTH? - Peace Corps Masters International 
Hans Lechner, Ph.D. candidate in Geology
Michigan Tech University
Graduate of Peace Corps Masters International program, Jamaica (’99-’01) and El Salvador (’07-’08)

The Peace Corps Master's International program offers a unique opportunity to pair graduate studies at one of more than 100 U.S. academic institutions with Volunteer service abroad. Established in 1987, Master's International equips Peace Corps Volunteers with the education and skills to serve successfully abroad—and, in turn, helps you earn your advanced degree. 
May 9, 2016
The Pope's Encyclical: Forming Consciousness for Faithful Citizenship
Bishop Richard Pates
Des Moines Diocese
May 17 - June 2, 2016 The Israel-Palestine Experience, 2016

2014-15

Date
Event
Sept. 4, 2014 St. Norbert Ambassador of Peace Ceremony & Reception
Deacon Juan Barajas was honored as the recipient of the 2014 Ambassador of Peace Award. The event included the award ceremony and reception.  
Sept. 11, 2014 Social Justice Fair
Quick info sessions followed by community time for students to ask questions of social justice organization representatives.
Co-sponsored by the Office of Leadership, Student Engagement & First Year Experience, and the Norman Miller Center for Peace, Justice & Public Understanding. 
Oct. 14, 2014

Ebola: Facts & Misconceptions
A presentation on the Ebola outbreak and human dignity. 

Oct. 16, 2014 Witness for Peace
The Norman Miller Center hosted Witness for Peace-Upper Midwest and two inspiring speakers from CACTUS, a Colombian advocacy organization that encourages women flower workers to fight for their rights by offering legal advice and support programs.
Oct. 17, 2014 Pizza & Politics
Wisconsin Governor's debate viewing.
Oct. 21, 2014 Red, White & You: Voting Your Conscience
Brown County Judge Marc Hammer talked about how to vote according to your personalities and beliefs. 
Oct. 28, 2014 “The Recruitment of Human Race Activists”
A Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding

Dr. James Forbes
The Harry Emerson Fosdick Distinguished Professor at Union Theological Seminary
Senior Minister Emeritus of The Riverside Church
President of the Healing of the Nations Foundation 
Oct. 29, 2014 Walk in Our Shoes Immigration Simulation
The Walk in Our Shoes immigration simulation gave participants a hands-on opportunity to learn about the problems and obstacles faced by Latino migrants living in our community and throughout the country.

Co-sponsored by Diversity, Equity & Inclusion; Multicultural Student Services; and the Norman Miller Center for Peace, Justice & PublicUnderstanding.
Nov. 4, 2014 Election Watch Party
Nov. 11, 2014 The War Comes Home
A documentary on Post-traumatic Stress Disorder. 
Nov. 17-21, 2014
International Education Week
Nov. 18, 2014 Peace Corps Information Session
Presented by Brett Heimann 

Feb. 5, 2015

Fair Trade Expo
March 9, 2015 “The Moral Imagination: Conflict Transformation in the Contemporary World”
A Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding

John Paul Lederach
Professor of International Peacebuilding, Director of Peace Accords Matrix
Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame 
March 31, 2015
"Disputed Land, Common Ground: The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict"
A provocative panel discussion with experienced panelists exploring the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and its prospects for peace.

Panelists:
Atalia Omer – Associate Professor of Religion, Conflict, and Peace Studies, Notre Dame University
Robert Kramer – Professor of History, St. Norbert College
Ali R. Abootalebi – Associate Professor of Political Science, UW-Eau Claire
Fouad AlKhouri – St. Norbert College, Intern, Norman Miller Center  
April 8, 2015 Great Decisions Lecture Series - Human Trafficking in the 21st Century
Dr. Kennedy talked about the various treaties and laws to prevent human trafficking and examine the root of the problem that enables traffickers to exploit millions of victims.

Dr. Ellen Kennedy
Executive Director, World Without Genocide 
April 22, 2015 Great Decisions Lecture Series - Middle Eastern Sectarianism
Many of the conflicts in the Middle East have been attributed to sectarianism, a politicization of ethnic and religious identity. Dr. Ishay discussed how sectarianism fits into a larger narrative of the Middle East, how governments have manipulated sectarian differences and what the U.S. is doing about it.

Dr. Micheline Ishay
Distinguished Professor of Human Rights and International Studies, University of Denver  

2021-2022

Sept. 14

12 p.m.

Virtual Program

Art in a Democratic Society Lecture Series with Aram Han Sifuentes

Aram Han Sifuentes is a fiber and social practice artist who works to claim spaces for immigrant and disenfranchised communities. Her work often revolves around skill sharing, specifically sewing techniques, to create multiethnic and intergenerational sewing circles, which become a place for empowerment, subversion, and protest. Exhibitions of her work have been exhibited at Jane Addams Hull-House Museum (Chicago), Hyde Park Art Center (Chicago), Chicago Cultural Center (Chicago), Pulitzer Arts Foundation (St. Louis), MCA Denver (Denver), and Moody Center for the Arts (Houston). Her multi-stage solo exhibition, Talking Back to Power: Projects by Aram Han Sifuentes, is currently on view at the Skirball Cultural Center (Los Angeles) through 2023.

 

Sept. 14

2-4 p.m.

Campus Center Lawn

SNC Involvement Fair

Stop by the NMC table at the Involvement fair to learn more about our programming, write a postcard to refugee children through the JRS Any Refugee program or register to vote with the help of COVO.

 

Sept. 17

11:30 a.m. -1:00 p.m.

Michels Commons Lobby

Constitution Day

The NMC staff will be distributing pocket copies of the US Constitution outside of Ruth's Marketplace over the lunch hours. Stop by to pick up you own copy. 

 

Oct. 5

12 p.m.

Virtual Program

 Art in a Democratic Society Lecture Series with U.S. Department of Arts and Culture

Founded in 2013 The U.S. Department of Arts and Culture (USDAC) is a “people-powered department” (not a federal agency) committed to supporting individuals and organizations in mobilizing creativity in the service of justice. While social issues may be grounded in politics and economics, the USDAC believes that to change the world we need to change the story. Images, language, and attitudes affect our ability to understand and act on the challenges we face as a society. The USDAC offers pathways of engagement for individuals and organizations eager to deepen a commitment to creativity and social change through the promotion of caring, reciprocity, and open communication.

 

Oct. 5

7 p.m. Lecture

Virtual Program

Norman and Louis Miller Lecture Series with Nadine Strossen

“How Should We Resist Hate? Free Speech vs. Censorship”

Professor Strossen's presentation will explain why the grand goals of the Miller Lecture – “celebrating human dignity and encouraging better understanding between people” – are best promoted by freedom of speech, even for hateful, extremist, and false speech.  Although calls to censor such speech are well-intentioned, experience demonstrates that censorship inevitably is at best ineffective, and at worst counterproductive, in advancing these important goals.  She will dispel several common  misunderstandings about free speech law that undermine support for it.  She will also discuss the many non-censorial measures that are more constructive in promoting individual dignity and intergroup understanding. She is especially looking forward to the audience Q&A session, because she is eager to answer as many questions and comments as possible that audience members may have about any free speech issues.

Follow this link to view the lecture

 

Oct. 6

1:00 p.m.

Virtual Program

Book discussion with Nadine Strossen: "HATE: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech, Not Censorship" 
On October 5, the Norman Miller Center will welcome virtually Nadine Strossen, immediate past President of the American Civil Liberties Union (1991-2008) and the John Marshall Harlan II Professor of Law at New York Law School,  for the Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding. Strossen is a leading expert in constitutional law and civil liberties. In anticipation of her visit, we are offering an opportunity for St. Norbert College faculty and staff to read and discuss her recent book, which is the topic of her presentation. In HATE: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech, Not Censorship, Strossen makes the argument that the best approach to combat hateful, extremist, and false speech is through counter speech. She maintains that although calls to censor hateful speech may be well-intentioned, such efforts are ineffective and counterproductive. The NMC will provide free copies of the book for up to 20 participants, who will join Strossen for a private discussion of the book and her lecture on October 6.

 

Oct. 11

5:30 p.m.
Reception

7 p.m.
Lecture

Bemis International Center/Virtual program via Zoom

Ambassador of Peace Award honoring Bishop Mark Seitz

Reception
Hendrickson Dining Room-Bemis International Center, St. Norbert College

Award Presentation and Lecture
Fort Howard Theater-Bemis International Center, St. Norbert College

Eucharist: The Body of Christ in History

At the core of Christianity stands the conviction that the death and Resurrection of Jesus Christ inaugurated a new moment in human history, with the birth of a community called to be witnesses to the end of victimization, the refusal to return violence for violence, and boundless hospitality and mercy given to us in the Eucharist. As a people nourished by the Eucharist, the church is called to risk entering into the world of the Crucified ones of today, to unlearn a sinful and dehumanizing logic that continues to weigh heavily on the poor, and to enact in history the way of agape and Communion. In this talk, Bishop Mark J. Seitz of the Diocese of El Paso speaks to his experience of a Eucharistic church that does justice on the US-Mexico border.

Both the reception and lecture are free and open to the public

The award presentation and lecture will be presented in a hybrid format both in-person at the Fort Howard Theater and virtually via Zoom. There is no registration for the in-person side of the program, however registration is required for the virtual program. 

 

Oct. 14

6 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Student Roundtable Meetings: Afghanistan and Refugees

Join the NMC student staff for a student-led conversation focusing on a different topic for each one. Pizza and beverages will be provided.

No registration needed

 

Oct. 18

7 p.m.

Virtual Program

"Refugee Resettlement in Brown County: A Panel Discussion and Community Forum"

In partnership with Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Green Bay, the Norman Miller Center for Peace, Justice & Public Understanding is hosting a panel discussion and community forum focusing on refugee resettlement in Brown County. We will be joined by several area experts, including Karmen Lemke (Executive Director, Catholic Charities), Said Hassan (Executive Director, Community Services Agency, Inc. [COMSA]), immigration attorney Sarah Griffiths, and others.
The program, which begins at 7pm on October 18, will be offered virtually via Zoom. 

2020-2021

Sept. 2

1-2:15 p.m.

Virtual Event

Ms. Lillian Medville creator of "Your Privilege is Showing"

Join Associate Professor of Teacher Education at St. Norbert College Erica Southworth as she hosts a virtual conversation with Lillian Medville creator of "Your Privilege is Showing" The fundamental philosophy is that systems of oppression(sexism, racism, privilege, ableism, classism, among others) are both personal and universal. We have all, no matter who we are, internalized and participated in these systems, and are hurt by them in some way. And still, we don't talk about them. This session provides the Brave Space container necessary for direct, and personal conversations to happen and social emotional learning to take place. 

 

Sept. 2 and 3

11 a.m.-
1 p.m.

Baer Mall

Voter Registration Drive and Get Out the Vote Pledge

Stop by Baer Mall to register to vote, ask questions about voting and to take the Get Out the Vote Pledge to score some swag. We will have representatives from COVO to answer questions and get you registered.

 

Sept. 8

12-1:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art in a Democratic Society Lecture Series: Center for Creative Citizenship

The Maryland Institute College of Art’s Center for Creative Citizenship integrates civic learning and action, as well as
democratic engagement, by engaging art and design students in projects relating to civic engagement, voter education, and get out the vote efforts, as well as supporting the development of partnerships, programs, and initiatives that advance the interests of Baltimore’s communities and neighborhoods.

Follow this link for more information.

 

Sept. 17

11 a.m.-
1 p.m..

Baer Mall

U.S. Constitution Day

Stop by and pick up a pocket version of the U.S. Constitution

Sept. 17

7-9 p.m.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Documentary Series: "Pray the Devil Back to Hell"

The film documents a peace movement called Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace. Organized by social worker Leymah Gbowee, the movement started with praying and singing in a fish market. Leymah Gbowee organized the Christian and Muslim women of Monrovia, Liberia to pray for peace and to organize nonviolent protests. Dressed in white to symbolize peace, and numbering in the thousands, the women became a political force against violence and against their government. Their movement led to the election of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf in Liberia, the first African nation with a female president. 

There is limited in-person seating available for this event, please arrive early to assure a seat. Doors will be closed once occupancy is met. Social distance and masking must be observed throughout the duration of the event.

Sept. 21

7 p.m.

Virtual Event

 

"Resilience as a Community" a Miller Lecture event with Leymah Gbowee

Consistent with the purposes of the Norman and Louis Miller Lecture Series, Ms. Gbowee wrote, "In the middle of this heartbreaking pandemic, notice that it is alerting global citizens--regardless of race, status, and accomplishments--to rethink life, our interactions, and attitudes toward "the other" and many more. This moment in our global history has forcibly reminded us of the inevitable truth--we are more connected than we are divided and our humanity is tied in ways that we have sadly allowed ourselves to forget. As we navigate this moment, let us all use our moments of social distancing to think about acts that bring our societies closer when the dust settles."

Ms. Gbowee won the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize and is a Liberian peace activist, social worker and women's rights advocate. She is the founder and President of the Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa. Ms. Gbowee is best known for leading a nonviolent movement of Christian and Muslim women which played a pivotal role in ending the fourteen-year Liberian civil war. 

Q&A with audience to follow.

Click here to view the recording

 

 

Sept. 22

2-4 p.m.

Baer Mall

Voting Information/Education Table

Stop by the voter information/education tables in Baer Mall to connect with Rachel Benck, our CEEP fellow, and COVO about voting questions.  

Sept. 24

7 p.m.

Virtual Event

"From Civility to Justice-Conversations Across the Aisle for Human Dignity and the Common Good" with MT Dàvila

Join MT Davila, Associate Professor of Practice at Merrimack College in North Andover, Massachusetts and president of the Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States (ACHTUS) for this virtual conversation across the aisle.

Dr. Dávila will present a lecture entitled From Civility to Justice: Conversations Across the Aisle for Human Dignity and the Common Good. In this talk she will explore the ways in which an emphasis on civility in the midst of our present political polarization can do great harm to many of the most vulnerable, minoritized, and marginalized populations among us, by allowing continued injustices to be perpetrated against migrant families, trans men and women, religious minorities, and others.  By contrast, in order to restore justice as a core principle of our public discourse, Dr. Dávila argues we must redirect our attention away from civility alone and reevaluate our conceptions of such basic principles of justice as human dignity and the common good.   

This event is co-sponsored by the Killeen Chair of Theology and Philosophy

 

Sept. 29

12-1:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art in a Democratic Society Lecture Series: Amanda Lovelee

Amanda Lovelee is a visual artist based in Minnesota. Lovelee had focused on civic engagement through a variety of projects. She worked as a "City Artist" through The Public Art St. Paul Program developing projects that made city planning more accessible to city residents.

 

Sept. 29

7:30-9:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Presidential Debate Viewing Party

Join other SNC campus members to watch the 2020 Presidential debate. Co-Sponsored by Pi Sigma Alpha, the political science honor society. 

Oct. 1

7:00 p.m.

Virtual Even

Documentary Discussion: "White Right: Meeting the Enemy"

Join us for a discussion of the documentary "White Right: Meeting the Enemy" ahead of Arno Michaelis' event on Oct. 13. Watch the film on your own schedule and join us virtual to discuss it. The documentary is streaming for free on SNC Kanopy

Oct. 7

7:30-9:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

 

Vice Presidential Debate Viewing Party

Join other SNC campus members to watch the 2020 Vice-Presidential debate. Co-Sponsored by Pi Sigma Alpha, the political science honor society. 

 Oct. 13

7-8:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

"The Gift of our Wounds" a conversation with Arno Michaelis

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Arno Michaelis was a founding member of a notorious worldwide racist skinhead organization, a reverend of a self-declared holy war and frontman of the hate-medal band, Centurion, which sold 20,000 CDs by the mid-nineties and is still popular with racists today. Single parenthood, love for his daughter and the forgiveness shown by people he once hated all helped turn Arno's life around, bringing him to embrace diversity  and practice gratitude for all life. After spending over a decade as a successful information technology consultant and entrepreneur, Arno is now a speaker, author of My Life After Hate and very fortunate to be able to share his ongoing process of character development with the world in an effort to counter the cycle of violence he once fueled.

Arno is featured in the Deeyah Kahn documentary "White Right Meeting the Enemy" . This film is available on SNC Kanopy. We recommend viewing the film at your convenience prior to the program.

Click here to view the recording.

 

Oct. 21

3:30-4:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Fr. Gregory Boyle Book Discussion with Bridget Burke Ravizza, Cabrini Jablon, and Becky Lahti 
In anticipation of Fr. Gregory Boyle's virtual visit to SNC as the 2020 St. Norbert Ambassador of Peace (award presentation and lecture on October 27), the Norman Miller Center for Peace, Justice & Public Understanding is hosting a faculty/staff discussion of his book, Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion. Leading this Zoom discussion will be Becky Lahti, Interim Co-Director of the Emmaus Center, Cabrini Jablon, Associate Director of Admission, and Bridget Burke Ravizza, Professor of Theology and Religious Studies. The book discussion will take place on October 21, from 3:30 to 4:30pm. Please follow the link below to register.
The Norman Miller Center will provide free copies of the book for the first 25 SNC faculty or staff members who register and request a copy. If you already have a copy of the book, you will be able to note that on the registration form as well.   
Registration is closed for this discussion.

 

Oct. 21

7-8:15 p.m.

Virtual Event

peakers include Marjan Safinia, Director of And She Could be NextAshley O’Shay, Director of UnapologeticYamila Ruiz, National High Road Director of One Fair WageSonya Renee TaylorThe Body is Not An Apology Author & Activist; and moderated by Astra Taylor, filmmaker, activist & author, most recently of Democracy May Not Exist, But We’ll Miss It When It’s Gone.

Co-hosted by The Norman Miller Center for Peace, Justice & Public Understanding at St. Norbert College, The Menard Center for the Study of Institutions and Innovation at UW Stout & The Wisconsin Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies, and in partnership with Black Leaders Organizing for Communities (BLOC)

These events will provide simultaneous English to Spanish language interpretation and Certified Deaf Interpreters. To access Spanish interpretation, please download the Zoom application to your desktop or mobile device.

These events are intended to be a non-partisan event on the importance of voting. We encourage everyone, regardless of political affiliation, to register to vote and vote in the elections this Fall to help preserve the integrity of our democracy.

 

Oct. 22

7 p.m.

Virtual Event

"Purple: America, We Need to Talk" short film discussion

Join us for a discussion of the short film "Purple" which is about polarized political parties. Watch the film on your own schedule then come to the discussion with an open mind. The film can be viewed through this link

 

Oct. 27

 

7 p.m.

Virtual Event

"The Whole Language: The Power of Extravagant Tenderness" Ambassador of Peace Award with Fr. Gregory Boyle

Fr. Boyle will share what he has learned in three decades working with marginalized populations at Homeboy Industries in Los Angeles, CA--that love is the answer, community is the context and tenderness is the connective tissue. Tenderness reflects the foundational notion that there are no is and them, only us. homeboy seeks to be what the world is invited to become. Kinship cannot happen without tenderness.

A native Angeleno and Jesuit priest, from 1986 to 1992 Father Boyle served as pastor of Dolores Mission Church in Boyle Heights, then the poorest Catholic parish in Los Angeles that also had the highest concentration of gang activity in the city. Father Boyle witnessed the devastating impact of gang violence on his community during the so-called "decade of death" that began in the late 1980s and peaked at 1,000 gang-related killings in 1992. In the face of law enforcement tactics and criminal justice policies of suppression and mass incarceration as the means to end gang violence, he and parish and community members adopted what was a radical approach at the time: treat gang members as human beings

In 1988 they started what would eventually become Homeboy Industries, which employs and trains former gang members in a range of social enterprises, as well as provides critical services to thousands of men and women who walk through its door every year seeking a better life.

Click here to view the recording.

 Nov. 3

Election Day 

Shuttles will be running from 8:30am-4:45pm in a continuous circle departing from the cul du sac between Admissions and the Mulva Library.

 

Nov. 10

12-1:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art in a Democratic Society Lecture: Girl Child Art Foundation

The Girl Child Art Foundation is an organization based in Lagos Nigeria that focuses on advocacy, empowerment, and civic engagement of girls through the arts.

 

Nov. 10

12-1:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

 Discovery of a New Nation: Native Americans and the beginning of the United States: A Conversation with Heather Bruegl, M.A., Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge Munsee Community and an enrolled member of the Oneida Nation

Join Heather Bruegl as she connects to the broad themes of peace, justice, and public understanding. Native History predates 1492. Native peoples have been on the North American continent for centuries before colonization began. Learn about U.S. History but from perspective of Native Americans. From the formation of the Iroquois Confederacy to landing on Plymouth Rock.  From the Lost Colony of Roanoke to the tribes that participated in the American Revolution and the move westward.  Discover the creation of the treaties between the United States and Native Nations.  Finally learn about the beginning of the end for Native Nations with Indian Removal Act and the Trail of Tears.  This lecture begins in the 1100’s and ends just before the Civil War in 1860.

 

Nov. 10

2-3:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

 Documentary Screening of Warrior Women

In the 1970s, with the swagger of unapologetic Indianness, organizers of the American Indian Movement (AIM) fought for Native liberation and survival as a community of extended families.

Warrior Women is the story of Madonna Thunder Hawk, one such AIM leader who shaped a kindred group of activists' children - including her daughter Marcy - into the "We Will Remember" Survival School as a Native alternative to government-run education. Together, Madonna and Marcy fought for Native rights in an environment that made them more comrades than mother-daughter. Today, with Marcy now a mother herself, both are still at the forefront of Native issues, fighting against the environmental devastation of the Dakota Access Pipeline and for Indigenous cultural values.

Through a circular Indigenous style of storytelling, this film explores what it means to navigate a movement and motherhood and how activist legacies are passed down and transformed from generation to generation in the context of colonizing government that meets Native resistance with violence.

Social distancing and masking will be required in the theater and attendance will be limited. 

This program is co-sponsored by Multicultural Student Services and The Council of Indigenous People.

 

Nov. 12

12-1 p.m.

Virtual Event

Madonna Thunder Hawk Q&A

Join Dr. Vicky Tashjian, Professor of History at St. Norbert College as she hosts a Q&A session with Madonna Thunder Hawk. Madonna Thunder Hawk is s a Native American civil rights activist best known as a leader in the American Indian Movement (AIM) and as an organizer against the Dakota Access Pipeline. She is also featured in the documentary Warrior Women. This film is streaming on SNC Kanopy and we encourage all participants to watch the film before the Q&A.

 

Nov. 17

12-1:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art in a Democratic Society Lecture Series: Laurie Jo Reynolds

Laurie Jo Reynolds is an artist, policy advocate, and researcher who developed the concept of “Legislative Art”, an art practice that seeks to intervene in government systems with the goal of concrete political change.

 

Nov. 23

7-8 p.m.

Virtual Event

 "Conversations at Home" 

Returning home after a semester at college can be stressful — even more so after months of political controversy and a pandemic. As you anticipate potentially difficult conversations back home, this virtual panel discussion will offer suggestions for a peaceful and productive transition. Please join the conversation with Dr. Jennifer Hockenbery (Dean of Humanities), Dr. Bruce Robertson (Director of Counseling and Career Development), Tanner Anderson (Area Coordinator and LGBTQ+ Support Services Coordinator), Derek Elkins (Interim Co-Director of the Emmaus Center), Dr. Robert Pyne (Director of the Norman Miller Center), and Bethany Kreklow (Student Community Organizer, Norman Miller Center).
 

 

Nov. 29

6-7:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Celebrate the Living Legacy of Dorothy Day: a Hunger for God,  a Striving for Goodness, a Passion for Justice

Join David Brooks, Anne Snyder and Paul Elie for a conversation about Dorothy Day. Together they will reflect on how, in a time of pandemic and strife, 40 years after her death, Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker inspire holiness and community.

This event is sponsored by the Dorothy Day Guild.

 

Jan. 26

6:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

"Mythbusters: How Textbook Pictures 'Whitewash' Religious History" hosted by Dr. Erica Southworth, Associate Professor of Education

Pictures tell a 1,000 words….and what we learn from textbook pictures is purposefully designed to shape our (biased) perspectives on race and gender. This is especially true when we look at images found in K-12+ textbooks. In history texts, for example, why are Moses, Jesus, Mary, and Mohammed all mythically depicted as white Europeans instead of depicted accurately as North Africans or Southwest Asians? And why are images of Sarah, Hagar, or Khadīja absent altogether? In short, why do 21st century textbooks strip ancient religious founders of their racial identities while simultaneously reinforcing gender-based hierarchies? 

Join Dr. Erica Southworth (SNC Teacher Education), Ms. Melonie Zielinski (Port Washington High School), and Ms. Haley Herbst (St. John Bosco Catholic Middle School) in their interactive “Mythbusters!” presentation to learn more about these imagery social injustices. Presentation attendees will also have the opportunity to participate in imagery analysis activities to help hone their own personal and professional racial and gender myth-busting skills. 

 Feb. 10

6:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

"Homegrown Hate & Domestic Terrorism" with Daryl Johnson

Daryl Johnson is one of the foremost experts on domestic extremist groups in the US. He is currently the founder of DT Analytics, a private consulting firm for law enforcement. He is regularly cited, featured, or quoted in media covering domestic extremist groups in the US, including the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, to name a few. Johnson is also a freelance writer for various media and civil rights organizations. In 2012, he testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on hate crimes and the threat of domestic extremism. Also joining the discussion this evening will be Dr. Robert Pyne, Director of the Norman Miller Center, and political science professors Dr. Wendy Scattergood and Dr. Angel Saavedra Cisneros.

This program is co- hosted by The Wisconsin Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies and We Are Many, United Against Hate.

Follow this link to view the video from this program.

 Feb. 18

12:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art, Technology and Society Lecture Series with Mark Tribe

Mark Tribe is a New York-based artist and Graduate Programs Chair at the 

School of the Visual Arts in New York. His drawings, performances, installations, and photographs often deal with social and political issues. His recent work explores the relationship between landscape and technology. He is the author of two books, The Port Huron Project: Reenactments of New Left Protest Speeches (Charta, 2010) and New Media Art (Taschen, 2006).

 

March 2

6:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

“Fight like Hell: Redefining Incitement in the 21st Century”

As we heard repeatedly during this month's impeachment trial of former president Donald Trump, incitement to violence is not protected speech under the First Amendment. But what is incitement? Since 1969, the standard legal definition has been drawn from a Supreme Court case, Brandenburg v. Ohio: incitement is to encourage other people toward actions that are imminent, intended, lawless, and likely. After over 50 years, should this standard be reconsidered? Is it still relevant in the Internet age? What is the meaning of incitement in 2021? Join us for a virtual panel discussion featuring: JoAnne Sweeny, JD, PhD, Professor of Law at the Louis D. Brandeis School of Law, University of Louisville; Eric Kasper, JD, PhD, Professor of Political Science at UW-Eau Claire, and Alan Bigel, PhD, Professor of Political Science and Public Administration at UW La Crosse.

This program is co-sponsored by The Menard Center for Constitutional Studies at UWEC and The Menard Center for the Study of Institutions and Innovation at UW Stout.

View the program here.

 March 8

7:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

 

Inspiring Female Leaders Panel Discussion

This event will highlight unique females in the Green Bay community who have fascinating stories to share about career development, community involvement, personal and professional growth, and how they inspire and empower other women!

The panel includes:

Joidon Jennings — Green Bay Packers UX Coordinator; Networking Expert
Marissa Michalkiewicz — Founder of Giveadaam Ventures; Sustainability expert in the Green Bay Community
Kristina Shelton — Wisconsin’s 90th Assembly District Representative; 
Abby Gildernik — Assistant Athletics Director at SNC

 

 

March 10

6:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

"Fratelli Tutti: Pope Francis' Letter on Friendship" 

In his third encyclical, Fratelli tutti, Pope Francis reflects on a topic of great importance: human solidarity and friendship. Following his election to the papacy, Pope Francis first greeted the world with the words fratelli e sorelle - "brothers and sisters." In this encyclical, he continues to address all men and women as his brothers and sisters, calling us to consider what our common brotherhood requires of us.

Join us for a panel discussion with St. Norbert Theology and Religious Studies Professors Dr. Tom Bolin, Dr. Karen Park and Dr. Howard Ebert moderated by St. Norbert Divisional Dean of Humanities Dr. Jennifer Hockenberry And senior Theology and Religious Studies student Cole Johnson as they examine different aspect of the encyclical. The panel discussion will conclude with a Q&A period.

 

March 11

12:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art, Technology and Society Lecture Series with Constance Hockaday

Constance Hockaday is a Chilean American artist whose work explores issues of public space, political voice, and belonging. Hockaday holds both an MFA in Socially Engaged Art and a Masters in Conflict Resolution. She is a TED Fellow and an artist in residence at UCLA. She has received support from the Rauschenberg Foundation, Map Fund, SF MOMA, Rainin Foundation, and Headland’s Center for the Arts.

Follow this to link to register.

 

March 25

12:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art, Technology and Society Lecture Series With jackie sumell

jackie sumell is a multidisciplinary artist and activist whose work interrogates the abuses of the American criminal justice system. She is best known for her collaborative project with the late Herman Wallace, one of the former Angola 3 prisoners, entitled The House That Herman Built. This project is the subject of the critically acclaimed documentary film Herman’s House. Sumell is a 2013 Open Society Soros Justice Fellow, a 2015 Nathan Cummings Foundation Recipient, a 2015 Eyebeam Project Fellow, and a 2016 Robert Rauchenberg Artist as Activist Fellow.  

 

March 29

6:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Voter Education Discussion

Wondering why you should vote in the spring election on April 6th or what's on the ballot?
Join us for a virtual panel discussion featuring Political Science Professors and Students from St. Norbert College

March 30

6:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

"Nonviolence: An Interfaith Conversation"

This program will feature presentations from four advocates of nonviolence, each describing the contribution of faith traditions to their perspective. Panelists will be Pardeep Singh Kaleka, Executive Director of Interfaith Conference of Greater Milwaukee and Executive Director of the Zeidler Group, which promotes dialogue across lines of difference; David Mueller, a former resident of the Catholic Worker and co-founder of the Dorothy Day Canonization Network; Jim Handley, certified Kingian nonviolence trainer and Senior Lecturer in Peace Studies at UW Stout; and Dr. Elliot Ratzman, Assistant Professor in the Religious Studies Department of Grinnell College, where he teaches courses in Judaism and Peace and Conflict Studies

April 6

12:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art, Technology and Society Lecture Series with Jonas Lund

Jonas Lund is a Swedish conceptual artist whose work critically reflects on ccontemporary networked systems and power structures. Lund's artistic practice involves creating systems and setting up parameters that oftentimes require engagement from the viewer. This results in game-like artworks where tasks are executed according to algorithms or a set of rules. Through his works, Lund investigates the issues generated by the increasing digitalization of contemporary society like authorship, participation, and authority.

 

April 8

7:00 p.m.
Lecture

Walter Theatre/Virtual Event

Spring Miller Lecture "Norbert of Xanten: The Enduring Relevance of a 950 year old Peacemaker" with Thomas Kunkel, president emeritus of St. Norbert College

Norbert, similar to the Miller Lecture Series, promoted unity, communication and tolerance among different cultures, ethnicities and traditions. Join Tom Kunkel as he examines what Norbert was doing in his time and how these kinds of outreach and peacemaking are needed more than ever today.

April 22

11a.m.-1 p.m.

Baer Mall

Earth Day 2021

Join us in Baer Mall to learn more about what you can do to be sustainable and reduce your single use plastic use. We will be handing out reusable bags designed by the NMC's Community Organizer Cara Orbell. These bags are manufactured from pre-consumer waste generated by factories during the fabric cutting process. Through a partnership with 1% For The Planet one percent of sales of this bag will be donated to nonprofits dedicated to protecting the planet. We will also have Earth Day stickers and lots of conversation. 

April 22

12:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Art, Technology and Society Lecture Series with Claudia X. Valdes

Claudia X. Valdes a conceptual visual artist and educator who explores the themes of trauma, memory, perception, and embodiment in her work. Major subjects within her works have been the history of U.S. nuclear arms, physical trauma, violent conflict, and positing art as a means to both catalyze and frame social spaces for meaningful discourse and to evoke reflection upon the ethics of human decision-making and actions and their impact on individual and collective life.

2019-2020

Sept. 6 4:30 p.m.-6 p.m. Campus Center Gym

SNC “Celebrity” Basketball Game to End Family Separation and Detention 

Multicultural Student Services and the Norman Miller Center will host a basketball game featuring a bucket raffle. All proceeds from the ticket sales and raffle will go to RAICES and Freedom for Immigrants. Tickets available at the door $5/students and $10/Faculty and Staff. 

Sept. 17 11:30 a.m..-1 p.m.

Ruth's Marketplace Lobby

U.S. Constitution Day

We will be distributing copies of the U.S. Constitution during lunch hours outside of Ruth’s Marketplace

Sept. 17 
6 p.m. Reception

7 p.m. Lecture

FK Bemis International Center

Ambassador of Peace Award with Robyn Davis

Reception
Hendrickson Dining room, Bemis International Center

Lecture
Fort Howard Theater, Bemis International Center

Sept. 20

8 a.m.

St. Norbert College Grounds

Hiroshima Peace Tree Planting

Sept. 21

10 a.m..-4 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

SNC Day – International Day of Peace

Join us for an open house with refreshments and children's activities celebrating the International Day of Peace. Representatives from the Coalition of Voting Organizations of Brown County will also be on hand to conduct voter registration. 

Oct. 8
6 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable Conversation: “Right to Life: Will Human Rights Survive Climate Change?”

Join us for a roundtable conversation, pizza will be provided

Oct. 10 
7 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

“The Middle East and the West: the Future of Human Rights” Lecture and Panel Discussion

Micheline Ishay, Ph.D. author of “The Levant Express: The Arab Uprising, Human Rights and the Future of the Middle East” charts bold and realistic pathways for human rights in a region beset by political repression. economic distress, sectarian conflict, refugee crisis and violence to women. With attention to how patterns of revolution and counterrevolution play out in different societies and historical contexts, Ishay reveals the progressive potential of subterranean human rights forces and offers strategies for transforming current realities in the Middle East. 

Panel discussion with Daniel Stoll, Ph.D and David Coury, Ph. D. to follow.

Oct. 22
6 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable Conversation: “Can He Say That? Free Speech v. Hate Speech”

Join us for a roundtable conversation, pizza will be provided. 

Oct. 29

5:30 p.m. Reception

7 p.m. Lecture

Walter Theatre

“Resisting Hate Through Public Understanding: A 25th Anniversary Celebration of the Miller Lecture”

Invite Only Reception
Michels Commons Ballroom

Lecture
Walter Theatre

Nov. 5 

6 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

Mulva Library Presentation Room

Roundtable Conversation: “Disqualify Them: Should Transgender Athletes be Allowed to Compete?”

Join us for a roundtable conversation, pizza will be provided.

Nov. 12-13

St. Norbert College

Las Cafeteras Residency

“Racism: Ain’t Nobody Got Time for That”
Nov. 12, 7 p.m. Fort Howard Theater, FK Bemis International Center

Concert
Nov. 13, 7 p.m. Walter Theatre

Nov. 19 6p.m.-7:30 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable Conversation: "Lock 'Em up or Set "Em Loose:Who Belongs in Prison"

Nov. 21
6:30-8 p.m.

Norbertine Center for Spirituality at The St. Norbert Abbey

The Impact of Homelessness: A Community's Response

Facilitator: Tony Pichler
Panelists: Robyn Davis, Executive Director, United Way of Brown County
               Michelle Frampton, Director, Brown County Homeless and Housing Coalition
               John Zakowski, Brown County Circuit Judge

Cost: Free will offering(suggested donation $5)

 Feb. 4
7 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Documentary Series "Revolution of the Heart: The Dorothy Day Story"

This film profiles one of the most extraordinary and courageous women in American history. She was the co-founder of the Catholic Worker Movement that began as a newspaper to expose rampant injustices during the Great Depression. It soon expanded to become a network of houses of hospitality to welcome the poor and destitute. Revolution of the Heart includes rare archival photographs and film footage plus interviews with actor/activist Martin Sheen, public theologian Cornel West, popular author Joan Chittister, Jim Wallis of Sojourners and many more.

Discussion to follow the screening with director Martin Doblmeier

Feb. 18
7 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Documentary Series: "True Justice: Bryan Stevenson's Fight for Equality"

The film follows 30 years of Equal Justice Initiative's work on behalf of the poor, the incarcerated and the condemned. Told primarily in his own word, True Justice shares Bryan Stevenson's experience with a criminal justice system that "treats you better if you're rich and guilty than if you're poor and innocent." The burden of facing this system is explored in candid interviews with associated, close family members and clients.

Panel discussion to follow the screening

Feb. 20
11 a.m.- 1:00 p.m.

Michels Commons Lobby

Better Together Day Celebration

Better Together celebrates interfaith dialogue and service on campuses around the country. Join us in the lobby of Michels Commons to share your interfaith thoughts and pick up some interfaith swag.

Feb. 28
6:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Documentary Series: "Normie: The Illusion of Normal, the beauty of love."

When Annemarie looks in the mirror, she sees Down Syndrome. She hate it. To her, the diagnosis is a giant barricade keeping her from the independence and intimacy she desires. She embarks on a journey of self discovery as she tries to understand what it means to be normal.

Co-sponsored by SNC Best Buddies and Down Syndrome Association of Wisconsin.

March 5
3:30 p.m.

Mulva Presentation Room 101

"Beit Sahour: City of the 'Shepherd's Field' between Israel and Palestine" a talk with Dr. Robert Kramer

Dr. Kramer, Professor of History, returned this semester after a sabbatical in the Middle East. Join us as he shares his experience.

March 10
6-7:30 p.m.

Mulva Library First Floor Flex Space

Roundtable Conversation: "Consent Beyond Sex: Trusting Relationships and Boundary Maintenance"

Join us for a student led, student focused roundtable conversation, in partnership with SGA and the Mulva Library.

April 20
7 p.m.

Virtual Screening

50th Anniversary of Earth Day Documentary "The Human Element"

Join us for a virtual screening of "The Human Element" with a post-screening discussion via Zoom. THis documentary follows environmental photographer, James Balog, as he travels the United States and captures the stories of everyday Americans on the frontline of climate change.

This event is co-sponsored by the Wisconsin Conservation Voters.

2018-2019

Aug. 23-24
8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Community Organizing 101
Featuring Dennis Donovan
National Director for Public Achievement, Sabo Center for Democracy and Citizenship, Augsburg College

Sept. 4-6
10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Voter Registration Drive

For more information about voting at St. Norbert College, see our Voting Information page.

Sept. 12
11 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Council on Foreign Relations Conference Call Series

The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
Speaker: Philip H. Gordon
CFR’s Middle East Program and Europe

For more information, visit the CFR webpage.

Sept. 18
6:00-7:30 p.m.

Campus Center Lounge

Roundtable Conversation: The Cost of Higher Education

Sept. 19
11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Council on Foreign Relations Conference Call Series

The Rise of Authoritarian Nationalism
Speaker: Madeleine K. Albright
Albright Stonebridge Group; Albright Capital Management LLC; and Georgetown University

For more information, visit the CFR webpage.

Sept. 20
6:30-8 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Action in Recovery: Addressing the Opioid Crisis in Brown County

In partnership with organizations with expertise and experience in opioid addiction and recovery, St. Norbert College is hosting a free community education event focusing on the opioid epidemic in Wisconsin and Brown County. The evening begins with a resource/information fair. The featured program will begin thereafter with the keynote speaker, Paul Krupski, Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Director of Opioid Initiatives. The program ends with a community panel question/answer discussion.

Sept. 22
10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

SNC Day — International Day of Peace Celebration

Join us for an open house with refreshments and children’s activities celebrating the International Day of Peace.

Sept. 26
7-9 p.m.

Walter Theater

Scott Ainslie in Concert

As a traditional musician with expertise in Piedmont and Delta Blues as well as Southern Appalachian fiddle and banjo traditions, Ainslie has specialized in performing and presenting programs on the European and African roots of American music and culture in community and educational settings. Ainslie came of age during the Civil Rights era, and cultivated a powerful affinity for cross-cultural exchange. He has studied with elder musicians on both sides of the color line – in the Old-Time Southern Appalachian fiddle and banjo traditions, as well as Black Gospel and Blues. He plays this music with affection, authority, and power. His performances present a wonderful palette of sounds and stories that will delight the ear, awaken the mind, and satisfy the heart.

 

Oct. 2
6-7:30 p.m.

Campus Center Lounge

Roundtable Conversation: Gender Rights and Feminism

Oct. 3
11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Council on Foreign Relations Conference Call Series

Africa’s Strategic Partners
Speaker: Reuben E. Brigety II
George Washington University

For more information, visit the CFR webpage.

Oct. 10
7-8:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

"Why is Sectarian Conflict on the Rise in the Middle East?" A lecture by Danny Postel

As the Middle East descends further and further into a maelstrom of violence and state breakdown, the new conventional wisdom in Western media and policy circles attributes the turmoil to supposedly ancient sectarian hatreds, primordial forces that make violent conflict inevitable and intractable. In this narrative, “sectarianism” possesses trans-historical causal power and serves as a catch-all explanation for the troubles plaguing the region. In this presentation, Danny Postel, Assistant Director of the Middle East and North African Studies Program at Northwestern University, will challenge this new conventional wisdom and suggest an alternative explanation for the recent spike in sectarian violence in the Middle East. He will show how various conflicts in the region have morphed from non-sectarian (and cross-sectarian) and nonviolent movements into sectarian battles and civil wars.

October 16
6-7:30 p.m.

Campus Center Lounge

Roundtable Conversation: Social Media, Technology, and Data Collection

Oct. 17
11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Council on Foreign Relations Conference Call Series

Global Cooperation on Migration
Speaker: Katharine M. Donato
Georgetown University

For more information, visit the CFR webpage.

Oct. 23
6:00 p.m. Reception
7 p.m. Lecture

Bemis International Center

Ambassador of Peace Award with Sean Callaghan 

Reception, 6pm
Hendrickson Dining Room, Bemis International Center

Lecture, 7pm
Fort Howard Theater, Bemis International Center

Oct. 24
7-9:00pm

Fort Howard Theater

"One Vote" — the documentary, with producer Christine Woodhouse

 

Filmed in five locations on a single day, One Vote captures the compelling stories of diverse voters on Election Day 2016. At times funny, surprising and heart-wrenching, the film eschews partisan politics in favor of an honest portrayal. Producer Christine Woodhouse will be present for the screening, and she will take questions after the film.

 

Oct. 25
6-7:30 p.m.

Campus Center Lounge

Roundtable Conversation: Refugees

Oct. 30
5:30 p.m. Reception
7 p.m. Lecture

Bemis International Center

Miller Lecture with Gary Dorrien

Reception
Hendrickson Dining Room, Bemis International Center

Lecture
Fort Howard Theater, Bemis International Center

Oct. 31
11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Council on Foreign Relations Conference Call Series

The Increasing Complexity of U.S. National Intelligence
Speaker: Michael P. Dempsey
CFR

For more information, visit the CFR webpage.

Nov. 1
7:30p.m - 9 p.m.

Cofrin 15

"Whats on My Ballot?" 
Learn more about this year's election in this non-partisan event, with information about the offices contested, the work they perform, and the candidates seeking your vote. 

Nov. 6

Between Mulva Library and Ariens Family Welcome Center

Election Day
An all day "Vote Together" party with shuttles running to the polls. For more information about registration and voting, see our Voting Information page. 

Nov. 7
6 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable Conversation: Legal Biases

Nov. 12
6 p.m. - 8:45 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

"Tickling Giants"

The film "Tickling Giants" tells the story of Dr. Bassem Youssef, the "Egyptian Jon Stewart", who decides to leave his job as a heart surgeon and become a late-night comedian. The movie is about how he finds creative, non-violent ways to protect free speech and fight a president who abuses his power. After the film, we will talk with the producer, Sarah Taksler, by Skype.

  • “An ebullient ode to freedom… a terrific movie” - Variety

  • “First-rate documentary” - The New York Times

  • “Fascinating…  a vivid personal portrait” The Hollywood Reporter

  • “A beautiful, funny, charming, insightful, laugh until your cry, and then cry until you laugh film”- Huffington Post

Nov. 14
11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Council on Foreign Relations Conference Call Series

U.S. Economic Security and the Future of Work
Speaker: Cecilia Elena Rouse
Princeton University

For more information, visit the CFR webpage.

Nov. 19
6 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable Conversation: The Stigmatization of Mental Health Issues

Nov. 28
11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Council on Foreign Relations Conference Call Series

Xi Jinping Power Profile
Speaker: Elizabeth C. Economy
CFR’s Asia Program

For more information, visit the CFR webpage.

Dec. 4
6 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable Conversation: Human Trafficking

Jan. 29
7 p.m.

Birder Hall

"Etty"-canceled due to weather
Etty is a one-women play based on the diaries of Etty Hillesum, adapted and performed by Susan Stein and directed by Austin Pendelton. 

For more information, visit the Etty webpage

Feb. 28
7 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

"This is Home"
A Documentary about the experience of Refugees

March 12
7-8:30 p.m.

Mulva Presentation Room

"Peacemaking: Being Human in a Time of Permanent War"

A lecture by Brian Terrell

Co-coordinator of Voices for Creative Nonviolence and member of the Catholic Worker Movement for more than 40 years

March 14
6 p.m.

Roundtable: An Open Dialogue
Pharmaceuticals and Healthcare

March 28
7-8:30 p.m.

Fort Howard Theater

Documentary Night

"Escape from Room 18"
A documentary that follows ex-Neo Nazis, John Daly and Kevin Connell, as they visit concentration camps in an effort to make amends with their past selves.

April 3
6-7:30 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable: An Open Dialogue
Voting Rights

April 5
8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Wisconsin Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies Annual Student-Faculty Conference

Forced Migration and Human Flourishing

 April 9

5:30 p.m Reception 


7:00 p.m.
Lecture

Bemis International Center

Miller Lecture with Susan Brooks Thistlethwaite

Reception: Hendrickson Dining Room

Lecture: Fort Howard Theater

April 24

6:00 p.m.

Norman Miller Center

Roundtable: An Open Dialogue Forum
Guns and Firearms

2017-18

Date   Event
Sept. 16, 2017 SNC Day
Sept. 27, 2017 Council on Foreign Relations - Fall 2017 Academic Conference Call Series

“The Role of the United Nations in Global Governance”

Speaker: Samantha Power
Harvard University
Sept. 27, 2017 "Welcoming Refugees: A Community Conversation
The Norman Miller Center hosted a conversation about refugee integration in communities. Honored guests included representatives from Sweden and a co-founder of COMSA, a local Somali resource organization.
Sept. 28, 2017 Documentary Night!

"The White Helmets"
A Netflix documentary that follows a group of Syrian first responders as they risk their lives in the midst of violence in Syria and Turkey.
Oct. 11, 2017 Council on Foreign Relations - Fall 2017 Academic Conference Call Series

“U.S.-Latin America Relations

Speaker: Shannon K. O'Neil
Council on Foreign Relations 
Oct. 17, 2017

The Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding

“Which Common Good? Rethinking Religion, Self-Interest and Agency”

By Joerg Rieger, Ph.D.
Cal Turner Chancellor's Chair of Wesleyan Studies 
Distinguished Professor of Theology, Vanderbilt University
View the lecture recording.

Oct. 25, 2017 Council on Foreign Relations - Fall 2017 Academic Conference Call Series

“Dashed Hopes of the Arab Spring

Speaker: Steven A. Cook
Council on Foreign Relations
Oct. 25, 2017

Breaking Barriers in Fashion
Mariah Idrissi is the world’s first hijab wearing model to be signed to ‘Select’ models and featured in a global campaign for H&M. As well as a model, she is an international public speaker promoting female empowerment and is part of a growing movement bringing modest fashion to the masses regardless of faith or background.
Oct. 26, 2017 Documentary Night!

"13th"
A Netflix documentary that explores racial inequality in the United States with a particular focus on the disproportionate representation of African-Americans in U.S. prisons.
Nov. 6, 2017 Slave: A Human Trafficking Survivor Finds Life
Jabali Smith was a 6-yr-old in Berkeley, California when he was trafficked along with his sister over the border into Mexico and held captive by a messianic doomsday sex cult. Smith sharde his journey as a child slave; the escape and the eventual rise from the ashes of tragedy. A story of unimaginable suffering followed by the discovery of success, love, compassion and forgiveness.
Nov. 8, 2017 Council on Foreign Relations - Fall 2017 Academic Conference Call Series

“Conflict Prevention and Mitigation

Speaker: Paul B. Stares
Council on Foreign Relations
Nov. 8, 2017 Jews, Christians and Muslims in the Holy Land
Dr. Robert Kramer
Professor of History
St. Norbert College

This lecture surveyed the history of inter-faith relations in Palestine, from the advent of Islam in the 7th century, through the era of the Ottoman Empire, up to the present, with particular emphasis on the modern period. It also included observations and images from the 2016 and 2017 St. Norbert College summer trips to Israel and the West Bank.
Nov. 15, 2017 Council on Foreign Relations - Fall 2017 Academic Conference Call Series

“Revolutionary Movements and International Relations

Speaker: Jack A. Goldstone
George Mason University
Nov. 28, 2017 Crossfading Wisconsin
Should 19-year-olds be able to drink? Should Wisconsin legalize marijuana? Wisconsin lawmakers have been debating this question, and the answer could affect you. A discussion of these questions.
Nov. 29, 2017 Council on Foreign Relations - Fall 2017 Academic Conference Call Series

“The State of the World

Speaker: Richard N. Haass
President, Council on Foreign Relations 
Nov. 30, 2017 Documentary Night!

Winter on Fire: Ukraine's Fight for Freedom
A Netflix documentary about a civil rights movement in Ukraine that erupts after a peaceful, student protest turns violent.
Dec. 10, 2017 International Human Rights Day
Jan. 26, 2018 Holocaust Remembrance Day
Jeffrey Gingold is the son of a survivor of the Warsaw Ghetto and author of "Tunnel, Smuggle, Collect: A Holocaust Boy," a biography based upon the hidden video and audio recordings of interviews with his father and grandmother. Gingold is an outspoken advocate for Holocaust education who discusses his father's epic survival and unforeseen life twists in the Warsaw Ghetto.
Feb. 23, 2018 St. Norbert Ambassador of Peace Award Presentation, Reception and Lecture
Harry Boyte, Senior Scholar in Public Work Philosophy at the Sabo Center for Democracy and Citizenship at Augsburg College and Founder of the International Youth Citizenship Initiative in Public Achievement, was honored as the recipient of the 2017 Ambassador of Peace Award. The event included an award ceremony, reception and lecture. 
Feb. 24, 2018 Conference: “Invigorating Democracy and Public Work
The conference will feature Harry Boyte (Augsburg College), Micheline Ishay (University of Denver), Harvey Kaye (UW-Green Bay), Alison Staudinger (UW-Green Bay) and more. Students are invited to submit poster projects on the conference theme, with the poster session running concurrently with lunch and breakouts. 
Feb. 26 - March 29, 2018 Oliver Ressler Exhibition – Catastrophe Bonds
March 1, 2018 Panel Discussion - "Visual Art, Social Action, and Grassroots Democracy"
In conjunction with the exhibition Oliver Ressler - Catastrophe Bonds, a multi-site survey of the work of Austrian artist Oliver Ressler in the galleries at St. Norbert College and the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, this panel aimed to examine the current state of aesthetics and politics in light of recent social movements and contemporary challenges to democracy. 
Moderator: Katie Ries
Panelists:
Laurie Beth Clark, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Nicolas Lampert, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Oliver Ressler, international visiting scholar
March 22, 2018 The Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding

“Disturbing Aesthetics of Race”

By M. Shawn Copeland, Ph.D.
Professor of Systematic Theology
Boston College
View the lecture recording.
April 9-13, 2018

The Mystical Arts of Tibet - Mandala Sand Painting
Tibetan Monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery
The Mandala is a sacred cosmogram used as an object of contemplation. It depicts the pure nature of the world in which we live as well as how we can live most effectively.

April 10, 2018

“The Symbolism of the Sand Mandala”
Tibetan Monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery

April 10, 2018 Better Together Day
Better Together Day celebrateds interfaith dialogue and service on campuses around the country. Part of the Interfaith Youth Core, Better Together Day events vary every year and at every campus.
April 12, 2018

The Mystical Arts of Tibet - Sacred Music and Dance
Performance by the Tibetan Monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery

April 22, 2018 Earth Day
April 25, 2018

“Jews, Christians and Muslims in the Holy Land: Part Two, The Modern Era”
Dr. Robert Kramer
Professor of History
St. Norbert College

This talk explained the historical background to the conflict in Paletsine since the late Ottoman era, with a special emphasis on the later 20th century.

2016-17

Date   Event
Aug. 31, 2016
Solidarity in a Time of Bias, Hate and Violence
Sept. 6 - 8, 2016
Voter Registration Drive
Sept. 8, 2016
"The True Cost" - Film screening and discussion
Sponsored by Fashion This Series
Sept. 16, 2016 U.S. Constitution Day
Sept. 22, 2016
2016 St. Norbert Ambassador of Peace Award Presentation and Reception
Presented to Shirlyn Miller in recognition of her steadfast support of peace and justice initiatives in our community.
Sept. 21, 2016 International Day of Peace
Sept. 22, 2016
The Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding

“The Word Peace and the Word Justice, and Why Sometimes the Peacemakers Are Blessed (But Only Sometimes)”

William Miller
Thomas G. Long Professor of Law
University of Michigan

Sept. 26, 2016
First Presidential Debate Watch Party
Oct. 3, 2016

Visual Art and Social Statements
Fr. Jim Neilson, O.Praem., Assistant Professor of Art
Brandon BauerAssistant Professor of Art 

The panel discussed the history of art and social engagement with a focus on primary historic and contemporary examples of artists engaging with the social issues of their time. 

Oct. 4, 2016
Vice Presidential Debate Watch Party
Oct. 9, 2016  Second Presidential Debate Watch Party
Oct. 24, 2016
“The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Up Close and Personal”
Robert Kramer, Ph.D.
Professor of History
St. Norbert College
Oct. 29, 2016
Nonviolence Training Day: Developing the Skills for Social Change
Jim Handley, UW-Stout
Co-sponsored by The Norman Miller Center and Wisconsin Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies 
Nov. 8, 2016 Election Day
Nov. 8, 2016

Election Watch Party
Nov. 10, 2016
Salam Neighbor - Film Viewing
”Salam (Hello) Neighbor“ is a film and campaign to connect the world to refugees. The film follows the journey of Chris and Zach as the first filmmakers ever allowed to be registered and given a tent inside Za'atari, the Jordanian refugee camp near the Syrian border, which is home to over 80,000 Syrian refugees. 
Nov. 30, 2016
What Can a President Do?
The 2016 presidential election prompted a national conversation about what President-Elect Trump actually has the power to change during his presidency. In this program, we looked at what power the American president actually has, and what citizens can do to either support or oppose changes. 
Feb. 1, 2017 2017 Israel/Palestine Trip Meeting
A meeting for students about the summer 2017 trip to Israel and Palestine.
Feb. 23, 2017

Dorothy Day: The World Will Be Saved by Beauty - a book discussion
Kate Hennessy

March 2, 2017 The Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding“Growing up Palestinian in Israel: One Man's Journey from Revenge to Reconciliation”
Aziz Abu Sarah, co-founder and co-CEO of MEJDI Tours
View the recording.
March 7, 2017 "Seeking Refuge" 
An open house gallery and interactive discussion about the refugee journey through the eyes of children. Featured the artwork and stories of refugee children from various conflict zones. Our interactive discussion, consisted of reflections from Dr. Pyne (Norman Miller Center), Dr. Osgood (Education) and Dr. Yesiltas (Political Science), all of whom have experience working with refugees or studying the recent wave of refugees into Europe.
March 8, 2017 Peace Corps Information Session
Jason Lemberg, regional recruiter for Peace Corps
March 23, 2017 ”What's in your water?“ Drinking Water Contamination in Wisconsin: A Panel Discussion
Co-sponsored with the Wisconsin League of Conservation Voters
March 27, 2017 The Mitzvah Project: A One-Person Play and Lecture
Roger Grunwald
March 30-31, 2017 Wisconsin Institute for Peace & Conflict Studies Conference
Gender, Peace, and Conflict: Toward a Deeper Understanding
An interdisciplinary conference for students and faculty at Alverno College in Milwaukee.
April 6, 2017 Better Together Day
Better Together Day celebrates interfaith dialogue and service on campuses around the country. Part of the Interfaith Youth Core, Better Together Day events vary every year and at every campus.
April 28, 2017 Arbor Day - Tree Planting Ceremony

2015-16

Date    Event
Sept. 15, 2015

2016 Israel/Palestine Trip Meeting
A meeting for students about the summer 2016 trip to Israel and Palestine.

Sept. 19, 2015
SNC Day 
Sept. 21, 2015
International Day of Peace

 
Sept. 24, 2015
Livestream of Pope Francis' Address to Congress
Co-sponsored by the Norman Miller Center, the Norbertine Center for Spirituality, and the Green Bay Diocese
Sept. 24, 2015

“Imagining Heschel”: Catholicism and Other Religions, a Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding
Colin Greer, author and president of the New World Foundation

A reading of a short play by Colin Greer about Rabbi Abraham Heschel's dialogue with Catholic leaders during the Second Vatican Council. This event marked the 50th anniversary of Nostra Aetate, the Council's historic statement about Judaism and other religions.

Sept. 25, 2015
Livestream of Pope Francis' Address to the United Nations and Interfaith Service
Co-sponsored by the Norman Miller Center, the Norbertine Center for Spirituality and the Diocese of Green Bay.

The Pope addressed the United Nations General Assembly and he then participated in an interfaith prayer service at the 9/11 memorial.

Sept. 27, 2015

Eid al Adha Celebration

Sept. 29, 2015

2015 St. Norbert Ambassador of Peace Award Presentation and Reception
Presented to Victor Ochen, founder of the African Youth Initiative Network and nominee for the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize.

Oct. 6, 2015
2016 Israel/Palestine Trip Meeting
A meeting for students about the summer 2016 trip to Israel and Palestine.
Oct. 6, 2015
Social Justice Fair
Oct. 20, 2015
Panel Discussion on Laudato Si
The first of three panel discussions regarding the new papal encyclical, which deals with climate change. The focus was on economic implications of climate change. 
Nov. 4, 2015 Peace Corps Information Session
Brett Heimann, Regional Recruiter for the Peace Corps Regional Office  
Nov. 10, 2015
Be the Change You Want to See: Introduction to Community Organizing
Dennis Donovan from Public Achievement
Nov. 12, 2015

We Can't Look Away: A Conversation About the World Refugee Crisis

Nov. 17, 2015
Panel Discussion on Laudato Si
The second of three panel discussions regarding the new papal encyclical, which deals with climate change. The focus was on religious implications of the encyclical.  
Nov. 16-20, 2015  International Education Week
Nov. 23, 2015
Fair Trade Expo
Dec. 8, 2015
2016 Israel/Palestine Trip Meeting
A meeting for students about the summer 2016 trip to Israel and Palestine.

Dec. 10, 2015

Human Rights Day

Feb. 3. 2016
"Trials of Spring" - film viewing
A feature-length documentary. Six short films. Nine women fighting for peace.
Feb. 8, 2016
2016 Israel/Palestine Trip Meeting
A meeting for students about the summer 2016 trip to Israel and Palestine.
Feb. 9. 2016
Panel Discussion on Laudato Si
The final panel discussion regarding the new papal encyclical, which deals with climate change. The focus was on the political impact of climate change.
Feb. 29-April 1, 2016  “Enslaved: A Visual Story of Modern Day Slavery”
A gallery exhibition of photography by Lisa Kristine
March 1, 2016
“The Faces of Modern Day Slavery,” a Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding
Lisa Kristine, humanitarian photographer
March 29, 2016  Fair and Ethical Trade: Working Alongside Catholic Relief Services to Create Sustainable Change
April 7, 2016 Better Together Day
Better Together Day celebrates interfaith dialogue and service on campuses around the country. Part of the Interfaith Youth Core, Better Together Day events vary every year and at every campus.
April 20, 2016
Grad school? Peace Corps? How about BOTH? - Peace Corps Masters International 
Hans Lechner, Ph.D. candidate in Geology
Michigan Tech University
Graduate of Peace Corps Masters International program, Jamaica (’99-’01) and El Salvador (’07-’08)

The Peace Corps Master's International program offers a unique opportunity to pair graduate studies at one of more than 100 U.S. academic institutions with Volunteer service abroad. Established in 1987, Master's International equips Peace Corps Volunteers with the education and skills to serve successfully abroad—and, in turn, helps you earn your advanced degree. 
May 9, 2016
The Pope's Encyclical: Forming Consciousness for Faithful Citizenship
Bishop Richard Pates
Des Moines Diocese
May 17 - June 2, 2016 The Israel-Palestine Experience, 2016

2014-15

Date
Event
Sept. 4, 2014 St. Norbert Ambassador of Peace Ceremony & Reception
Deacon Juan Barajas was honored as the recipient of the 2014 Ambassador of Peace Award. The event included the award ceremony and reception.  
Sept. 11, 2014 Social Justice Fair
Quick info sessions followed by community time for students to ask questions of social justice organization representatives.
Co-sponsored by the Office of Leadership, Student Engagement & First Year Experience, and the Norman Miller Center for Peace, Justice & Public Understanding. 
Oct. 14, 2014

Ebola: Facts & Misconceptions
A presentation on the Ebola outbreak and human dignity. 

Oct. 16, 2014 Witness for Peace
The Norman Miller Center hosted Witness for Peace-Upper Midwest and two inspiring speakers from CACTUS, a Colombian advocacy organization that encourages women flower workers to fight for their rights by offering legal advice and support programs.
Oct. 17, 2014 Pizza & Politics
Wisconsin Governor's debate viewing.
Oct. 21, 2014 Red, White & You: Voting Your Conscience
Brown County Judge Marc Hammer talked about how to vote according to your personalities and beliefs. 
Oct. 28, 2014 “The Recruitment of Human Race Activists”
A Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding

Dr. James Forbes
The Harry Emerson Fosdick Distinguished Professor at Union Theological Seminary
Senior Minister Emeritus of The Riverside Church
President of the Healing of the Nations Foundation 
Oct. 29, 2014 Walk in Our Shoes Immigration Simulation
The Walk in Our Shoes immigration simulation gave participants a hands-on opportunity to learn about the problems and obstacles faced by Latino migrants living in our community and throughout the country.

Co-sponsored by Diversity, Equity & Inclusion; Multicultural Student Services; and the Norman Miller Center for Peace, Justice & PublicUnderstanding.
Nov. 4, 2014 Election Watch Party
Nov. 11, 2014 The War Comes Home
A documentary on Post-traumatic Stress Disorder. 
Nov. 17-21, 2014
International Education Week
Nov. 18, 2014 Peace Corps Information Session
Presented by Brett Heimann 

Feb. 5, 2015

Fair Trade Expo
March 9, 2015 “The Moral Imagination: Conflict Transformation in the Contemporary World”
A Norman and Louis Miller Lecture in Public Understanding

John Paul Lederach
Professor of International Peacebuilding, Director of Peace Accords Matrix
Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame 
March 31, 2015
"Disputed Land, Common Ground: The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict"
A provocative panel discussion with experienced panelists exploring the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and its prospects for peace.

Panelists:
Atalia Omer – Associate Professor of Religion, Conflict, and Peace Studies, Notre Dame University
Robert Kramer – Professor of History, St. Norbert College
Ali R. Abootalebi – Associate Professor of Political Science, UW-Eau Claire
Fouad AlKhouri – St. Norbert College, Intern, Norman Miller Center  
April 8, 2015 Great Decisions Lecture Series - Human Trafficking in the 21st Century
Dr. Kennedy talked about the various treaties and laws to prevent human trafficking and examine the root of the problem that enables traffickers to exploit millions of victims.

Dr. Ellen Kennedy
Executive Director, World Without Genocide 
April 22, 2015 Great Decisions Lecture Series - Middle Eastern Sectarianism
Many of the conflicts in the Middle East have been attributed to sectarianism, a politicization of ethnic and religious identity. Dr. Ishay discussed how sectarianism fits into a larger narrative of the Middle East, how governments have manipulated sectarian differences and what the U.S. is doing about it.

Dr. Micheline Ishay
Distinguished Professor of Human Rights and International Studies, University of Denver  
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